Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Go Figure! Figurative Language Miss K.’s English Use the provided skeleton note handout to fill in and follow along!

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Go Figure! Figurative Language Miss K.’s English Use the provided skeleton note handout to fill in and follow along!"— Presentation transcript:

1

2 Go Figure! Figurative Language Miss K.’s English Use the provided skeleton note handout to fill in and follow along!

3 Recognizing Figurative Language The opposite of literal language is figurative language. Figurative language is language that means more than what it says on the surface. It usually gives readers a specific feeling about or emotion towards the subject/s at hand. Poets or writers use figurative language quite frequently. As a reader, one must be conscious of the difference. Otherwise, a poem or book may make no sense at all. Printed QuizOnline Quiz

4 Recognizing Literal Language “I’ve eaten so much I feel as if I could literally burst!” In this case, the person is not using the word literally in its true meaning. Literal means "exact" or "not exaggerated." By pretending that the statement is not exaggerated, the person stresses how much he has eaten. Literal language is language that means exactly what is said. Most of the time, we use literal language.

5 What is figurative language? Whenever you describe something by comparing it with something else, you are using figurative language.

6 You’re a mean one… See if you can pick out any FIGURATIVE language devices in the following video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fMrggPzmb1c Does anything in your writing prompt “All because of the Grinch…” relate or compare to the video? If so, how or why? Explain with a peer close to you.

7 Types of Figurative Language Imagery Simile Metaphor Alliteration Personification Onomatopoeia Hyperbole Idioms Assonance

8 Imagery Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses. Sight Hearing Touch Taste Smell

9 Imagery EXAMPLES: Language that appeals to the senses. Descriptions of people or objects stated in terms of our senses. Sight – I saw trees of vibrant green, skies of deep blue, and pretty pink flowers out my window. Hearing – Thousands of crickets could be heard chirping in the otherwise quiet pasture. Touch – Her grandpa’s hands felt like sandpaper: tough, rough, and battered. Taste – The lemons tasted so sour they made his lips pucker and his eyes squint. Smell – After lighting the candle, it smelled like a bowl of fresh cut mangos, melons, and cantaloupes.

10 Simile A figure of speech which involves a direct comparison between two unlike things, usually with the words like or as. Example: The muscles on his brawny arms are strong as iron bands. Example: His skin was as shiny as a mirror.

11 Metaphor A figure of speech which involves an implied comparison between two relatively unlike things using a form of be. The comparison is not announced by like or as. Example: The road was a ribbon wrapped through the desert. Example: The old woman is a wilting flower.

12 The girl was a fish in the water. The clown was a feather floating away.

13 Alliteration Repeated consonant sounds occurring at the beginning of words or within words. Example: She was wide-eyed and wondering while she waited for Walter to waken. Example: Coffee caused her craziness.

14 Stan the strong surfer saved several swimmers on Saturday. Tiny Tommy Thomson takes toy trucks to Timmy’s on Tuesday. Click here to read more alliterations.

15 Assonance Repetition of internal (within words) vowel sounds. No end rhyme is needed! Example: Frogs certainly sit on logs. Example: She lay upon hay in May. Example: Talk the talk and walk the walk!

16 Personification A figure of speech which gives the qualities of a person to an animal, an object, or an idea. Example: The wind yells while blowing. The wind cannot yell. Only a living thing can yell. Example: The leaves sped down the sidewalk. The leaves cannot speed. Humans can..

17 The flowers danced in the wind. The Earth coughed and choked in all of the pollution. The friendly gates welcomed us.

18 Onomatopoeia The use of words that mimic sounds. A sound word. Example: The firecracker made a loud ka-boom! Example: Water splashed out of the bucket. Example: The bacon sizzles on the stovetop.

19 Chug chug chug!! Swish swish swish Yeeeeee Ahhhhhhhh Glippp Gluppp Gluppp

20 Hyperbole An exaggerated statement used to heighten effect. It is not used to mislead the reader, but to emphasize a point. Example: She’s said so on several million occasions.

21 Idioms An idiom is a phrase whose meaning cannot be figured out from the literal definition, but refers instead to a figurative meaning that is known only through common use of a language. An idiom is an expression that we may know what it means but can’t word for word translate (or explain it).

22 Idioms again. So an idiom refers to an expression in one language that cannot be matched or directly translated word-for-word in another language. Example: "She has a bee in her bonnet.” Meaning "she is obsessed," which cannot be literally translated into another language word for word.

23 Maybe that was just a BLESSING IN DISGUISE? Oh, those are a DIME A DOZEN. He’s just a CHIP OFF THE OLD BLOCK!

24 What about in reality?! Yes, all around you and every single day you encounter Figurative Language! You YOURSELF may even use Figurative Language. How AWESOME is that?! Watch this real video that examples real examples: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U_pxfifB6Co Can you think of any others in your life, such as in movies, TV, books, magazines, or even billboards? Discuss after raising your hand.

25 Name that Device GAME! 1. That guy deserves a slap on the wrist for littering. 2. She lit up like a methane gas explosion! 3. Across the pond the rock did skip. 4. The bee couldn’t stop buzzing about the flowers. 5. No way the weather will be windy today. 6. It was seriously a billion degrees that July! 7. A proud round cloud floated whitely and lightly. 8. Before the show, I was told to go break a leg! 9. The potato chip went “crunch crunch” in his mouth. 10. Happily the storm shook the ocean. 11. Her eye were fireflies in the night. Decide which type of figurative language is being used in each number below. CHOICES: hyperbole, onomatopoeia, simile, metaphor, assonance, alliteration, idiom, and imagery.

26 Name that Device GAME! 1. That guy deserves a slap on the wrist for littering. 2. She lit up like a methane gas explosion! 3. Across the pond the rock did skip. 4. The bee couldn’t stop buzzing about the flowers. 5. No way the weather will be windy today. 6. It was seriously a billion degrees that July! 7. A proud round cloud floated whitely and lightly. 8. Before the show, I was told to go break a leg! 9. The potato chip went “crunch crunch” in his mouth. 10. Happily the storm shook the ocean. 11. Her eye were fireflies in the night. Answer are possibly: hyperbole, onomatopoeia, simile, metaphor, assonance, alliteration, idiom, and imagery. Idiom simile personification onomatopoeia alliteration hyperbole assonance Idiom onomatopoeia personification metaphor

27 Pair-N-Share TASK: Find a partner. In those pairs and on a sheet of paper, generate 1-2 original examples of EACH figurative language learned from this PowerPoint: Imagery Simile Metaphor Alliteration Personification Onomatopoeia Hyperbole Idioms Don’t be afraid to illustrate those examples! We’ll share after all have compiled their examples.

28 That’s all folks. Here ends the most informative and entertaining PowerPoint ever presented in English room 206! Keep your ears peeled and stay tuned for the next task…. HYPERBOLE IDIOM

29 Figurative Language Resources Eye on Idioms (Online PPT) Eye on Idioms Paint by Idioms (Game) Paint by Idioms Alliteration or Simile? (Quiz) Alliteration or Simile? Similes and Metaphors (PPT) Similes and Metaphors The Search for Similes, Metaphors, and Idioms (PPT) The Search for Similes, Metaphors, and Idioms Alliteration (PPT) Alliteration Onomatopoeia (PPT) Onomatopoeia Personification (PPT) Personification Hyperbole (PPT) Hyperbole Idioms (PPT) Idioms Simile (PPT) Simile

30 Teaching Similes and Metaphors Alliteration Lesson Plan and Resources Hyperbole- Lesson Plans and Resources Idiom Lesson Plan Imagery- Lesson Plans and Resources Lesson Plan for Puns Onomatopoeia- Lesson Plans and Resources Personification Lesson Plans and Resources Proverbs- Lesson Plans and Resources


Download ppt "Go Figure! Figurative Language Miss K.’s English Use the provided skeleton note handout to fill in and follow along!"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google