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School Centres for Teaching Excellence Symposium Two Hosted by.

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1 School Centres for Teaching Excellence Symposium Two Hosted by

2 Session One Theme: New research into the work and role of Teacher Educators in School-University partnerships A focus on the role of the teacher educator in building more effective school- university-community partnerships

3 Welcome and Acknowledgement of Country In the spirit of reconciliation, Monash University recognises that it is situated on country for which the Kulin Nations (and the Gunai/Kurnai Nation at Gippsland) have been custodians for many centuries and on which they have performed age-old ceremonies of celebration, initiation and renewal. We acknowledge their living culture and unique role in the life of this region and offer our deep appreciation for their contribution to and support of our academic enterprise.

4 Key questions: This symposium is an opportunity for each SCTE to share their experiences in regards to the key questions: What is the role of a teacher educator in the 21 st century? What are the professional learning needs of teacher educators? What are the knowledge and skills that teacher educators require to be effective in strong school-university partnerships? What can Universities and school communities do better to build an effective teacher educator workforce?

5 Overview of the day 9.00 - 9.30 Registration and coffee 9.30: 9.45: Theme: New research into the work and role of Teacher Educators in School-University partnerships. Input and stimulus: –Input 1 - Professor Simone White on research into ‘third space’ teacher education and the implications for school-university-community partnerships. Roundtable Discussion –Input 2 – Koonung Cluster input –Input 3 – Hume Cluster Roundtable Discussion 11am Morning tea 11.15 Theme: Beyond the Classroom: The need for a new teacher educator workforce Input and Stimulus: –Input 1: Dr Ros Black on 'partnerships' and new ways for universities and schools to think about forming partnerships beyond the classroom. Roundtable Discussion –Input 2: Gippsland Cluster –Input 3: CEP Cluster –Input 4: Bendigo Cluster Roundtable Discussion 12.30 Lunch 1.15 Theme: New considerations for school- university-community partnerships. Input and stimulus: –Input 1: Associate Professor Lucas Walsh on how can school-community-university partnerships better foster adaptability, and asks: how do these partnership approaches fit within the broader learning eco-systems of the 21st century? Roundtable Discussion –Input 2: Point Cook cluster –Input 3: Northern Bay cluster Roundtable Discussion 3pm Recommendations Roundtable discussion and compiling of recommendations 3.45 Concluding remarks 4pm Close

6 New research into the work and role of Teacher Educators in School-University - community partnerships Input and stimulus: –Input 1 - Professor Simone White on research into ‘third space’ teacher education and the implications for school-university- community partnerships. Roundtable Discussion –Input 2 – Koonung Cluster input –Input 3 – Hume Cluster Roundtable Discussion Session One

7 Beyond the Classroom: The need for a new teacher educator workforce. Input and Stimulus: –Input 1: Dr Ros Black on 'partnerships' and new ways for universities and schools to think about forming partnerships beyond the classroom. Roundtable Discussion –Input 2: Gippsland Cluster –Input 3: Rural Cluster –Input 4: Bendigo Cluster Roundtable Discussion

8 New considerations for school-university- community partnerships Input and stimulus: –Input 1: Associate Professor Lucas Walsh on how can school-community-university partnerships better foster adaptability, and asks: how do these partnership approaches fit within the broader learning eco-systems of the 21st century? Roundtable Discussion –Input 2: Point Cook cluster –Input 3: Northern Bay cluster Roundtable Discussion Key question: What can Universities and school communities do better to build an effective teacher educator workforce?

9 Input 1 - Research into ‘third space’ teacher education and the implications for school- university-community partnerships. Presented by Professor Simone White Monash University Email: simone.white@monash.edusimone.white@monash.edu

10 Issues in Teacher Education “2 world pitfall” between schools and universities and the challenges of bridging boundaries to support both pre-service teacher education and in- service professional learning (Zeichner, 2010). Disconnect between coursework and learning opportunities in field based experiences (Valencia, Martin, Place and Grossman, 2009) Tensions between theory and practice (Darling-Hammond, 1994) Old models of ‘supervision’ and practicum (1:1) persist.

11 Partnerships? School University School University Community

12 Hybrid (or third) spaces where academic and practitioner knowledge and knowledge that exists within communities come together in new and less hierarchical ways in the service of teacher learning (Zeichner, 2010, p. 89) School Community University Third or hybrid spaces 3 rd space as a site from which to assist students in negotiating, bridging and navigating across differences.

13 Partnerships - Hybrid teacher educators (new workforce) Building Partnerships across the hybrid spaces calls for better understanding of the diverse systems and ways of working. Border crossers and Brokers “Overlap and displacement of domains of difference” (Bhabha, 1994 ) Rather than binary oppositions – ‘both and also’ are favoured (Soja, 1996) School based Community based University based 3 rd space as sites for collaboration as well as innovation

14 Partnership design features to consider Matching timelines and timeframes Understanding each other’s language Recognising and valuing different workload demands The ‘new’ PST (travel, money) Alignment assessment Professional Learning…… “Within the collective third space, conversation between university-based and school based teacher educators {and community based} can serve as sites to grapple with understandings of teaching practices and challenges of learning to teach” (Martin, Snow, Torrez, 2011, p.300)

15 Discussion What has been the boundary-bridging efforts in your SCTE? What changes needed to be made? What do you see as the challenges for the different groups (school, university and community based) in working and learning in the 3rd space?

16 Input 2: School Centres for Teaching Excellence: the possibilities of partnerships Koonung Cluster Presented by: Larissa McLean Davies The University of Melbourne Melbourne Graduate School of Education

17 Master of Teaching and School Centres for Teaching Excellence – a natural partnership Clinical teaching – as partnerships Clinical teaching: transforming pre- service curriculum, pedagogy and assessment through partnerships Clinical teaching: partnerships transforming culture

18 A Teaching Fellow’s perspective: “The most notable feature of the Master of Teaching, for me, being a Teaching Fellow, is the partnerships…this is unique; I think it makes a difference in placing students; in supporting students; and in [helping them] make a connection between the practice and the theory they learn at University.” (CPLA Project, 2012)

19 Integration of Learning Differentiation of Learning Master of Teaching (Semester 1) Professional Practice & Seminar Learners, Teachers & Pedagogy Social & Professional Contexts Language and Teaching Learning Area A1 Learning Area B1 Clinical Praxis Exam Clinical Practice Exam – introduced in 2010 Professional Practice Mentor Teachers Teaching Fellows and Clinical Specialists Students Professional Practice Mentor Teachers Teaching Fellows and Clinical Specialists Students

20 “To integrate practice with theory and the opportunity to constantly apply that to the classroom during our placement is invaluable.” “The most rewarding aspect was genuinely feeling like an expert on my focus student and her learning need, and being able to consider factors that affected her learning in a practical and productive way.” “I thought the most valuable part was seeing how it all connected together, and really putting into practice what we had learnt from uni.”(CP Project, 2011) “The CPE is fundamentally important – from the point of view of seeing the outcome students are moving towards at the end of semester. It is instrumental in my discussions with mentor teachers, as to what TCs may be wanting to research, why they are collecting data. In terms of the learning area it has helped me to really emphasise what we do need to focus on in semester 1.” (CPLA project, 2012, TF and LA specialist)

21 Master of Teaching: Teaching to inspire W: masterofteachingmelbourne.edu.au © The University of Melbourne

22 MGSE and School Centres for Teaching Excellence: Koonung Group – eastern Melbourne Koonung Secondary College Box Hill High School Mt Waverley Secondary College Box Hill North Primary School Mont Albert Primary School Ringwood Heights Primary School Greythorn Primary School

23 Partnerships “ The visit was of critical importance to me, and I think it should be compulsory for every MTeach Secondary Candidate… my mind was opened to a whole different world ”

24 Pedagogy - re-thinking mentoring arrangements for pre-service teachers Re-thinking mentoring arrangements for pre-service teachers

25 Transforming practice: Specialist Certificate in Education (Clinical Teaching) “The feedback from your course has been sensational, it has inspired some amazing conversations and some powerful self reflection. The teachers here also will want advice about ‘what to do next’ to continue their Masters program.”

26 Impact… Inspire, May 2012, Issue 4, page 55-56.

27 A/Prof Bill Eckersley College of Education Victoria University Krystina Simpson Mentor Leader Broadmeadows Valley PS Graeme Luck Director, Adgo Pty Ltd Input 3: Hume/Broadmeadows Cluster Mentor leaders and Leadership Partners: Hume Senior Secondary College Meadows PS Broadmeadows PS Broadmeadows Valley PS Campbellfield Heights PS Roxburgh Park PS Victoria University DEECD/NWV Region

28 Session One Six schools involving : 100 BEd Year 2 and 4 pre-service teachers. five university educators: facilitating 2 core education units of study onsite, to promote professional learning and discourse. Teams of mentor teachers at each school supported by Mentor leader.

29 Mentoring! I’d like you to meet my student teacher First, you have to get their attention!

30 Mentoring AlwaysSometimesNever Listening with empathy Using coaching behavioursDiscipline Sharing expertiseUsing counselling behavioursAppraisal Mutual LearningChallenging assumptionsAssessment by a third party Professional friendshipBeing a role modelSupervision Developing insight through reflection Being a sounding board Encouraging Clutterbuck, 1998. Learning alliances: Tapping into talent

31 Mentoring Instead of being mentor driven, with the mentor taking full responsibility for the mentee’s learning, the mentee learns to share responsibility for the learning setting, priorities, learning and resources and becomes increasingly self-directed. When the learner is not ready to assume that degree of responsibility, the mentor nurtures and develops the mentee’s capacity for self-direction over the course of the relationship. As the learning relationship evolves, the mentoring partners share the accountability and responsibility for achieving a mentee’s learning goals (Zachary, 2000) Dependent..............Independent............Interdependent

32 Hume Cluster – Mentor Leader Program Objectives: provide collegiate support to Mentor Leaders through the development of a cluster network; raise the profile of teachers undertaking the Mentor Leader and Mentor Teacher role; develop and share a stronger understanding of the knowledge and behaviours demonstrated by successful mentors when mentoring pre service teachers; develop local capacity and understanding to enable the sustainability of the university/school partnership; heighten recognition of the value of immersion as a key component of the learning journey for future teachers. develop and formalise a collaborative partnership and pathway for teacher learning and input to Victoria University, College of Education.

33 Hume Cluster – Mentor Leader Program Program outline: Professionalism of pre service teachers in SCTE schools – what is it? how is it explained/demonstrated? How is communication at the senior (Principal and Dean) level developed and maintained between partners? Eg VU and individual schools What are the links between university units of study and school immersion as pedagogy? What strategies can/do mentor leaders use to lead and support their teacher peers in the mentoring of pre service teachers? What structures are in place to enable effective and timely feedback from mentor teachers to the school leadership eg positive advice and stories, emerging problems. What skills and knowledge should a Mentor Leader have as capabilities? What skills and knowledge should Mentor Teachers have as capabilities? What are the opportunities for Mentor Leaders (and Mentor Teachers) to interact with University Contacts / University staff/lecturers to learn and inform teacher education practice? How does the Mentor Leader role contribute to individual teacher’s career development aspirations – and how can this experience be captured and leveraged?


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