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 A brief history lesson  A clear view of what the data is for  How do we build up a picture over time (Formative)  An annual judgement (Summative)

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Presentation on theme: " A brief history lesson  A clear view of what the data is for  How do we build up a picture over time (Formative)  An annual judgement (Summative)"— Presentation transcript:

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2  A brief history lesson  A clear view of what the data is for  How do we build up a picture over time (Formative)  An annual judgement (Summative)  Analysis

3 What is the data for Formative Assessments Summative Assessments Analysis

4  Mental deficiency act the Education (Handicapped Children) Act new schools - educationally sub normal-severe

5  1944 Education Act – ‘ineducable’ – Junior Training Centres

6  1969 – A man on the moon

7  1970 the Education (Handicapped Children) Act new schools - educationally sub normal-severe

8 Assessments Psychometrics (Defecits) Skills Analysis Model Checklists Alan Howarth

9  Supplements the National Curriculum up to level 1 in each of the National Curriculum foundation subjects at key stages1, 2 and 3.  Pupils, aged 5-16, with Special Educational Needs who are working below level 1 of the National Curriculum.  Eight level descriptions of increasing difficulty, from P1-P8.  The performance descriptions for P1 to P3 are common across all subjects.

10 English - Speaking  P6 Pupils initiate and maintain short conversations using their preferred medium of communication. They ask simple questions to obtain information, [for example, ‘Where’s cat ?’]. They can use prepositions, such as ‘in’ or ‘on’, and pronouns, such as ‘my’ or ‘it’, correctly.

11 o Schools should have a clear rationale for what the data is for. Why? o Confusion over which pupils they are for o Confusion over the uses of the data o Need to know the target audience o Need to know information we want from the data What is the data for

12 Confusion over which pupils o Pupils with Special Educational Needs (P Level Guidance DCSF 2007) They are not appropriate for use with children who do not have a SEN even if they are working below National Curriculum level 1 o But (Ofsted 2010) says the term (SEN)is used ‘too widely’ and leads to low expectations and low achievement. o But progression Guidance says Throughout this guidance we refer to learners with SEN/LDD. In some of our analyses and in much of what we say, we also include learners who have fallen below age-related expectations but who may not have a special educational need or learning difficulty. (DCSF 2009) o Less of a problem in Special Schools (SLD/PMLD)? o In mainstream there may be a grey area – special need/slow learners. o Age 5-16 (DCSF 2007), Not age specific (PIVATS), 2-16 (PACE) What is the data for

13 Confusion over what the data will be used for? o ‘The Department and Ofsted hope to make use of this national information in future so that schools which use the P Scales can make meaningful comparisons about the progress made by pupils working below National Curriculum levels’. (DfES 2005 P 10). o QCA stated that P Scales should not be used ‘as a crude performance indicator’ (QCA 2005 P6). o ‘School and national performance indicators should include the data that is now collected on the progress and outcomes of children and young people working below Level 1 of the National Curriculum.’ (OFSTED 2010 P 14). What is the data for

14 Confusion over what the data will be used for? o There was ‘no agreement about what constituted good progress for pupils with LDD’ which ‘prevented vital analysis of data at all levels’ [School, LA and National]. (Ofsted 2005 P 2). o They go on to say ‘Pupils with even the most severe and complex needs were able to make outstanding progress in all types of settings’. (Ofsted 2005 P3). o The 2010 document states ‘there is little validated information for headteachers to use when challenging the view of pupils’ achievement’. (Ofsted 2010 P64) What is the data for

15 Statutory when reporting attainment for pupils with special educational needs who are working below level 1 of the national curriculum. They are used at the end of key stage 1, key stage 2 and key stage 3 for reporting teacher assessment in English, mathematics and science to QCDA. P scales are also used for reporting teacher assessment to parents What is the data for

16 Supporting the Target Setting Process – 2001 Setting Targets for Pupils with SEN – 2004 Progression Guidance – 2009 onwards What is the data for

17 o Data is collected nationally but analysed locally/internally (Progression Guidance) o We need to report to parents (From the guidance so far)We need to o Submit key stage data nationally and set targets o Use annually to track progress o Report to parents o Track individual pupils and set targets o Look at the school as a whole (school improvement) o Look at groups of pupils within the school o Compare the school and individuals with external benchmarks (ideally) That is relatively clear. What is the data for

18  No one (OFSTED, DFE, HMI) has a clear idea about what data should be collected and particularly how it should be analysed  Schools need to be able to tell a coherent well argued story about their pupils progress.  To do this they need to be clear about the purpose of collecting it and the group they are doing it for. What is the data for

19 Formative Assessments Summative Assessments Analysis Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose

20 Teachers should base such judgements on a review of evidence gathered from everyday teaching and learning (a Formative Record ) Professional judgement should be used to decide which P scale description best fits a pupil’s performance.

21 o Built up over time o Evidence of Achievement o Show progression through Levels o Allows teacher to know roughly where to aim the Summative Assessment o Allows setting of ‘small step/next step targets (AfL) WEB

22 Formative Record

23 Evidence/Portfolio/Learning Journey o Important for pupils working at early levels who may not have much written work o Useful for moderation o Powerful to report back to parents – more meaningful than ‘P6’ o Consolidates the teachers judgement for the summative assessment Formative Record

24 WEB Formative Record

25 What is the data for Formative Assessments Summative Assessments Analysis Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Small steps record Portfolio of evidence ‘Ballpark’ view for summative AfL

26 Making a Summative Judgement o ‘Standard’ procedures? o Teacher judgement – ‘best fit’ o Moderation o Whole P Levels (Durham, Government) o Alternative Schemes (PIVATS, B Squared, PACE) Summative Record

27 Standard Procedures There are none nationally. Schools need to decide o Date for tests (summer, 2 nd half term?). Consistency o System to use (PIVATS, B Squared, PACE). Consistency locally? o Protocol around ‘best fit’ judgements whether whole P scales or alternatives. At what point do you credit a pupil with a level? Usually everything but there are exceptions eg handwriting Dilemma of some at one level, some at the next. Formative records are vital here. o Enter data into….. Summative Record

28 Moderation o Cold or hot o Pupil Ranking report o Portfolio of examples – eg PIVATS, Assessing Pupil Performance Using the P Levels (Buck and Davies) or school examples through the Learning Journey o Should not be over complicated Summative Record

29  Moderation Summative Record LEWIS JACOBMURPHY04.8 FRANCISWALE44.8 ALFIEWILLIAMS54.8 CHANELHURST64.8 JAKEBRATHERTON05 EMILYBAILEY55 LIAMLEWIS65 CONNORIGOE5.2 CODYROWLAND15.2 REECEQUINN25.2 NATHANELLIS25.2 GEORGIOSXYPAKIS25.2 SAMUELCHADWICK55.2 FAITHBLACKHAM05.5 JESSICABAILEY25.5 JAKEMORRIS25.5 Use the Durham Data base to Rank Order the pupils and group them. Note the disparity in age between similar attaining pupils. School/Local/Regional

30 What is the data for Formative Assessments Summative Assessments Analysis Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Small steps record Portfolio of evidence ‘Ballpark’ view for summative Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Agree protocols Moderate Enter Data

31 o School Level Overall trends Attainment Progress Targets o Pupil Level Overall trends Attainment Progress Targets

32 School Level Picture over time Trends Relationship between aspects Relationship between subjects Last few years relationship is consistent. Writing is lowest – national picture Overall steady increase over time Drop off since 2008 Analysis - Whole School Question – How do the P scores vary over time for the whole school?

33  It should not be assumed that standards in a special school are below those expected of pupils of a similar age nationally. For some pupils this may well be the case but for others it may not. This is covered in the supplementary guidance which is included in The evaluation schedule for schools. Inspectors should:  not hold preconceived notions about pupils’ abilities  check on the attainment of pupils on admission to the school and their current attainment level  recognise that in some cases an increase in the number and range of qualifications achieved by pupils may be a reflection of curriculum changes rather than improvements in attainment or progress  describe the attainment of different pupils in the text of the report if there is a significant difference between groups that cannot be fully explained by the grade awarded (or an asterisk if attainment has not been graded). ‘learning and progress judgement alone to determine the judgement for achievement’

34 Attainment Overall Y4? Teaching/pupils Y3? Analysis – Whole School Question – How does attainment look for different aspects compared to similar pupils?

35 Attainment – Whole School These graphs show variations across the Year Groups Analysis – Whole School Question – Does attainment vary for different year groups in the school?

36 Attainment - Questions o How do we compare overall o Variations in year groups/Key Stages o Variations between aspects o Variations between groups o Cohort targets? School Improvement Plan Analysis

37  analyse the outcomes for different groups. While these groups may be small it is still meaningful to look at patterns over time as these can be a good indicator of differences in outcomes  analyse the quality of provision, especially teaching and access to additional opportunities for different groups, and consider the impact this has on outcomes  ask how the school has responded to any changes in its pupil population, such as admitting pupils with more complex needs. While attainment information may show a difference in the levels reached from year to year, if school’s response to these changes has been effective there should not be a reduction in the progress made by pupils or the quality of provision.

38 Individual Pupils – Attainment Analysis – Individual Pupils Question – What are the patterns of attainment Plateau Rapid improvement Look for Trends Strengths Weaknesses Areas for development Useful to give parents an overview

39 First nameYear groupScorePercentileScorePercentileScorePercentile CONNOR LEVI PATRICK MASON GARY ROSE CHARLIE CHARLES Individual Pupils – Attainment Analysis – Individual Pupils MLD? PMLD? National Curriculum ? RFL Question – Do pupils attainments show they are correctly placed and following the correct curriculum?

40 Progress o Same questions o Same groups o Do FSM/Ethnicity effect progress of SLD/PMLD/MLD Analysis – Whole School Using Excel we can easily sort the lists by adding an extra column and looking at FSM, ethnicity – Do these effect progress? Question – Does Progress vary for different groups in the school?

41 Analysis – Whole School Progress We can analyse how each aspect compares with the national sample and with each other Can also compare years Improvement in writing? Question – How does progress compare with national data?

42 Progression Guidance Good start but o Category of need (Evidence from Ndaji and Tymms + the progression guidance tables). Can we ‘wish away disability’? o Other disabilities (eg SLD +ASD) o Aggregated English Scores (Lit + Comm) – how useful? o 2 levels of progress (MLD/SLD/PMLD) o PMLD (Routes for learning) o The ‘remarkable persistence’ of some children’s difficulties despite skilled teaching has been noted by Friedrickson and Cline (2009 P41). o Danger of low expectations / ‘a child like that’ o Despite that the OFSTED guidance is very clear – use the PG Individual stories Analysis

43  use RAISEonline and the Progression materials 2010–11 data sets 1 to 3Progression materials 2010–  evaluate the rigour of the moderation procedures for assessing against P-scales. As a minimum this should be across the school; better practice involves moderation across a group of schools, local authority or region  consider pupils’ ages and starting points, together with the time they have been receiving specialist support or attending the school, to form a view about progress  do not use a pupil’s category of special educational need or disability to make a judgement about the progress made. However inspectors should look to see if pupils with a particular need or disability are performing differently from other pupils in the school (School Level)  maintain high expectations of pupils’ learning during lesson observations  check that individual targets and group targets have sufficient ambition and have taken into consideration the expectations illustrated within the Progression Materials 2010–11 and RAISEonline

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45 Individual Pupils – Annual Progress Analysis – Individual Pupils Progress Which pupils are / are not making progress. Those not making progress should trigger an alert Question – which pupils are not making progress?

46 Individual Pupils – What do we do about it o A plan that will include action and targets and an alert if progress wasn’t as expected o Individual targets based on ‘expected progress’ from a national database eg Durham – What is a challenging target? o Assumption they will make the target or we will investigate why Teaching (methods, specialist approaches) Curriculum balance/time Physical barriers Planning Analysis – Individual Pupils

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48 Telling the story See RAPP

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51 What is the data for Formative Assessments Summative Assessments Analysis Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Small steps record Portfolio of evidence ‘Ballpark’ view for summative Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Agree protocols Moderate Enter Data School Level Individual Level Targets (Individual and school)

52 What is the data for Formative Assessments Summative Assessments Analysis Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Small steps record Portfolio of evidence ‘Ballpark’ view for summative Statutory obligations Target Group Target audience Purpose Agree protocols Moderate Enter Data School Level Individual Level Targets (Individual and school


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