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Together for Resilient Youth Coalition Wanda Boone, Founder.

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Presentation on theme: "Together for Resilient Youth Coalition Wanda Boone, Founder."— Presentation transcript:

1 Together for Resilient Youth Coalition Wanda Boone, Founder

2 TOGETHER FOR RESILIENT YOUTH VISION Vision: Resilient Youth in a Healthy Drug Free Community MISSION Mission: TRY prevents substance abuse among youth and adults by reducing community risk factors through advocacy, education, policy change, mobilization and action.

3 Through the Years Reviewed the 125 page gang assessment written by Buddy Howell: Gang violence and substance abuse in Durham Public Schools Conducted a forum to discuss the gang assessment. Fifty community organizers, public health agencies, treatment providers, and representatives from public schools, universities and local government officials participated 2006 – But where and why? The report did not distinguish between schools 2008 – Studied available compliance check, crime, health and nutrition reports and ordered GEO maps from Duke University 2009 – 2011 – Continued relationship building, identifying various ordinances and presenting data to community groups. Strategic Planning meeting with Alcohol Beverage Commission, Alcohol Law Enforcement, Local Alcohol Beverage Commission and Police Department Drafted Alcohol Density

4 September 14, 2011 Alcohol Roundtable Participants: Chairman Jon Williams, NCABC, Mike Herring, NCAC, Jeff Lasater, NCALE, Assistant Chief Mihaich DPD, Renee Cowick, NCABC, Kristin Milam, NC ABC, Agnes Stevens, NCABC Participants and coalition members: Jennifer Snyder, DPD, Virginia Johnson NC State DHHS, Colleen Hughes, Partnership for a Drug Free North Carolina, Dylan Mulroney-Jones, NCPUD, Maria I.Esponoza PAC 1, Julio C. Olmos, Elcentro Hispano, Rob Tart, Durham Rescue Mission, Walter Cole, Durham Rescue Mission, Tekola Fisseha, Durham Health Department, Joel Rosch, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Michael Palmer, Durham County, Eddie Hernadez, Heidi Carter, Durham School Board, Virginia Bridges, N&O, Lynwood Best, Neighborhood Improvement Services, Juanita Evans, PAC 4, Chrissy Bond- Wooster, John Martin, PAC 1, Montez Lane, North Carolina Coalition Initiative, Elizabeth Montgomery, North Carolina Coalition Initiative, Cheryl Shiflett, PAC 2, Nancy Kneepkins, PAC 2, Debbie J. Royster, Peter Katz, PAC 1, Nadia Edwards, Larry E. Thomas, Nanci Appleman-Vassil, Facilitator – The Apples Group, Harold Chestnut, PAC 4, Mindy Solie, PAC 3, Alice Cheek, PAC 5, MaryAnne Black, Duke Community Health Systems, Wanda Boone, PAC 1, Steve Hopkins, PAC 1, Darryl Boone, PAC 1,, Dr. Evelyn Schmidt, Minnie Forte Brown, School Board Chair, Ervin Williams, Union Baptist and African American Health Initiative, Katina Terry, DSS, Dr. E Jean Moore, Ashley Hester, Durham Crisis Center, Pilar Rocha-Goldberg, Executive Director, El Centro Hispano, Dr. Christopher Eady, Executive Director of Triumph Cares, Dr. Faye Calhoun-Broadwater, Retired Deputy Director National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA).

5 T.R.Y. Coalition Members: Participants and coalition members: Our first member in 2005 was Howard Clement, III. Jennifer Snyder, DPD, Colleen Hughes, Partnership for a Drug Free North Carolina, Maria I.Esponoza PAC 1, Julio C. Olmos, Elcentro Hispano, Tekola Fisseha, Durham Health Department, Joel Rosch, Duke Center for Child and Family Policy, Juanita Evans, PAC 4, Nancy Kneepkins, PAC 2, Peter Katz, PAC 1, Harold Chestnut, PAC 4, Mindy Solie, PAC 3, Alice Cheek, PAC 5, Dr. Donna Durnford, VetCorp VISTA, Dr. Evelyn Schmidt, Ernie Mills, Durham Rescue Mission, Minnie Forte Brown, School Board Chair, Maurice Ritchie, Duke Divinity, Ervin Williams, Union Baptist and African American Health Initiative, Joshua Ladd, MATRIX (Green Technologies), Hazaline Umstead, PAC 3, Patricia Burchett PAC 3, Alice Breeden, PAC 3 NCBCBS, Jose Lee, National Heart Association, Floyd Laisure, City County Violence Prevention Committee, Gloria Dillard, Juvenile Justice, Jeffrey Forde, Parks and Recreation, Katina Terry, DSS, Kimberly Monroe, DUMC, Lisa Finlay, TROSA, Mary Powell, Alcohol Drug Council of NC, Ann Doolen, Alcohol Drug Council of NC, Mina Forte Ferguson, DPS, David Reese, East Durham Children’s Initiative, Peter Baker, Director Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services, Desiree Simpson, Pregnancy Prevention, Dr. E Jean Moore, Ashley Hester, Durham Crisis Center, Michelle Smith, Safe and Drug Free Schools Coordinator, Dr. Jonathan Livingston Assistant Professor Community Psychology, Pilar Rocha- Goldberg, Executive Director, El Centro Hispano, Dr. Christopher Eady, Executive Director of Triumph Cares, Dr. Faye Calhoun-Broadwater, Retired Deputy Director National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), Juliet Hurley, President Everchange, LLC, Genvieve Alkeny, Duke Global Medicine Substance Abuse and HIV Trainer, Bill Patterson, Retired, North Carolina Department of Crime Control and Public Safety, Alcohol Law Enforcement Division as Deputy Director for Administration. T.R.Y. Youth Coalition Peer Leaders: Gabrielle McCarty, PAC 2, Brianna Forbes, PAC 1, Johntaye Carter, PAC3 and Kayla Tate and Hillside HS, PAC 4, Zaryne Thompson PAC 1 and Southern HS. Each leader has engaged at least 10 youth each. They reached 19,000 in one day using social media.

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7 Durham County 262,000

8 Violent Crime Homicide, rape, robbery and aggravated assault Violent crime up 5 percent compared to 2010 Violent crime rate per 100,000 up 4 percent from 2010 Durham Police Department Data 2010

9 Health of Residents in Durham County 77.7% of residents exercised in the past month. 41.7% of residents smoked 100+ cigarettes in their lives 99.4% of adult residents drank alcohol in the past 30 days. CDC Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System Survey Questionnaires from 2003 to 2009: Read more:

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11 ALCOHOL OUTLET DENSITY Alcohol Purchase Surveys: Alcohol outlet density in Newark, N.J. - single most important environmental factor explaining why violent crime rates are higher in certain areas of the city than in others. Alcohol outlet density was much more important in determining crime rates than other factors, including employment rate and median household income.

12 ARRESTS

13 Our Neighborhood Affects Our Health Unhealthy CommunityHealthy Community vs Exposure to toxic air, hazardous waste Clean air and environment Unsafe even in daylight Safe neighborhoods, safe schools, safe walking routes No parks/areas for physical activity Well-equipped parks and community recreation Limited affordable housing is run-down; linked to crime ridden neighborhoods High-quality mixed income housing, both owned and rental Convenience stores, cigarette and liquor billboards, no grocery store Well-stocked grocery stores offering nutritious foods

14 Our Neighborhood Affects Our Health Burned-out homes, littered streets Well-kept homes and tree-lined streets Streets and sidewalks in disrepair Clean streets that are easy to navigate No culturally sensitive community centers or opportunities to engage with neighbors Multicultural community programs, opportunities for participation in community life No local health care services Primary care through physicians’ offices or health center; school- based health programs Lack of public transportation, walking or biking paths Safe public transportation, walking and bike paths Unhealthy CommunityHealthy Community vs

15 NC Alcohol Beverage Reports Durham, NC January 2011 – October 2011 Fines ranged from $300 - $3, of 24 underage 1 stolen property 1 dispensing prescription drugs 1 no annual report 2 defacing bottle 1 gun on site 1 stolen property 2 Underage person left in charge 2 unauthorized possession of spirituous liquor

16 Counter Tobacco Capstone Team

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18 There are racial disparities in alcohol retailer location and density in Durham County: Predominantly communities of color and racially mixed areas have the highest alcohol / tobacco retailer density The only schools with alcohol / tobacco retailers in their neighborhoods are in racially mixed areas or communities of color Counter Tobacco Capstone Team

19 WILMINGTON FOCUS: CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT Wilmington Police Department statistics indicate that calls for service in the downtown service district soars to its average peak of over 600 between the hours of 1:00 a.m. and 3:00 a.m. This peak in service calls is approximately three times as great as the average for all other hours of the day in that same district and closely correlates with the bar closing time.

20 The Central Business District exhibits the close correlation of alcohol outlet density and increase in crime that has been documented in academic studies. Recently compiled statistics from the Wilmington Police Department (attached) indicate that the downtown service district has an incidence of violent crime that exceeds by 75% the number of crimes in the next closest service district. WILMINGTON FOCUS: CENTRAL BUSINESS DISTRICT

21 NEXT STEPS IMPLEMENT VARIOUS STRATEGIES TO INCREASE COMPLIANCE INTRODUCE VARIOUS ORDINANCES TO INCREASE HEALTH AND WELLNESS FOR ALL CITIZENS CONTINUE TO ENGAGE THE COMMUNITY

22 THANK YOU Wanda Boone, Executive Director Durham Together for Resilient Youth DurhamTRY.org


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