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World War II “Never before have we had so little time to do so much.” – President Franklin D. Roosevelt.

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Presentation on theme: "World War II “Never before have we had so little time to do so much.” – President Franklin D. Roosevelt."— Presentation transcript:

1 World War II “Never before have we had so little time to do so much.” – President Franklin D. Roosevelt

2 Introduction to World War II 1.How does total war impact and change society? In what ways does this allow for positive and negative change? 2.To what extent could the United States have prevented World War II or the atrocities of World War II from happening? 3.How did the role of the United States in international affairs change with the end of World War II? 4.Should weapons of mass destruction be considered acceptable weapons for waging war? 5.Did World War II make World War III impossible or inevitable? Essential Questions

3 Question. What failed following World War I? What nations were neglected at the Treaty of Versailles?

4 Question. Who suffered during the Depression in the United States? How would the Depression make you lose faith in your government?

5 Introduction to World War II Totalitarianism? Complete rule by a single party and its leader in which all aspects of people’s lives are controlled without opposition. Governments and Leaders of the War

6 Introduction to World War II Fascism Intense nationalism, private corporations with government controls. Militarism Government based on the idea of a strong military. Socialism Common ownership (by the government) of the means of production to settle class disputes. Governments and Leaders of the War

7 Fascism Benito MussoliniAdolf Hitler

8 Fascism in Italy

9 “Il Duce” Fascism in Italy Mussolini would rise to power in 1922 with the “Black Shirts”.

10 “Il Duce” Fascism in Italy Mussolini desired an Italy that resembled the Empire of Rome (“Spazio vitale”). In 1935, Italy invaded Ethiopia.

11 Fascism in Germany

12 “Das Führer” Fascism in Germany After WWI? Germany owed thirty-three billion dollars in war reparations. Yearly installments of five billion marks were to be paid.

13 “Das Führer” "The mark, which had traded at about four to the dollar before the war, now shot up to 600,000 to the dollar. By summer (of 1920), the exchange rate was 630 billion marks to the dollar and inflation was so rampant that prices were doubling daily, sometimes hourly. People needed wheelbarrows or baby buggies to carry enough paper money to conduct even the simplest transactions. Sending a letter cost ten billion marks. A streetcar ride that had cost one mark in 1914 now cost fifteen billion. Pensions became worthless. People found that savings carefully built up over a lifetime wouldn't buy a cup of coffee. Eventually, at the peak of the madness, prices rose to 1,422,900,000,000 times their levels of ten years earlier.” How did the economic conditions in Germany allow Adolf Hitler to rise through the ranks? Hitler Speech

14 “Das Führer” Fascism in Germany The National Socialist Party played off German betrayal following WWI. Dismantled the Weimar Republic and seized power in Retracted promises made in the Treaty of Versailles. Mini Bio - Adolf Hitler

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16 Militarism in the Empire of Japan Emperor Showa HirohitoPrime Minister Hideki Tojo Tojo BioHirohito Bio

17 Land of the Rising Sun

18 Socialism in the USSR

19 The Soviet Union After the death of Lenin, Joseph Stalin would take control of the USSR. Through his Five Year Plans and Purges, Stalin made the USSR the third most industrious nation on earth. Stalin Bio

20 Question. What were the alliances during World War II?

21 Alliances During World War II Militaris m FascismNazism Communism EconomicsPolitics Democracy Monarchy Consider the political ideologies of the time. Why do you believe that the democratic west and the communist east decided to become allies?

22 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe Step One: Re-take the land that was once yours! How does the war begin? 1936

23 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe Step Two: Take land that isn’t yours (Anschluss)! How does the war begin? 1938

24 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe Step Three: Take land that isn’t yours but kind of is! How does the war begin? 1938

25 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe WAIT! Would Great Britain and France want to fight another war after their losses in World War I? No. Great Britain, France, Italy, and Germany sign the Munich Pact. How does the war begin?

26 German Aggression PM Neville Chamberlain upon returning from the Munich Pact: How does the war begin? “My good friends, for the second time in our history, a British Prime Minister has returned from Germany bringing peace with honour. I believe it is peace for our time. We thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Go home and get a nice quiet sleep”

27 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe Step Four: Take land that isn’t yours but kind of is but take all of it! How does the war begin? 1938

28 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe WAIT! Form an alliance with the Soviet Union. Germany signs the non-aggression pact with the USSR. How does the war begin? 1939

29 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe Step Five: Start World War Two! How does the war begin? 1939

30 German Aggression Six Step Guide to Invading Europe Step Six: Invade the rest of Europe! How does the war begin?

31 American Involvement. Looking Ahead?


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