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The War for Independence Chapter 4 Parliament Passes The The Sugar Act (1764) Placed duties on imports Merchants begin to smuggle Colonists were forced.

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Presentation on theme: "The War for Independence Chapter 4 Parliament Passes The The Sugar Act (1764) Placed duties on imports Merchants begin to smuggle Colonists were forced."— Presentation transcript:

1 The War for Independence Chapter 4 Parliament Passes The The Sugar Act (1764) Placed duties on imports Merchants begin to smuggle Colonists were forced to be tried in Royal Courts The Stamp Act (1765) * A British stamp had to be placed on all legal documents

2 Quartering Act (1764)Quartering Act (1764) Colonists must provide shelter for British ArmyColonists must provide shelter for British Army Sons of Liberty *Sons of Liberty * Led by Samuel AdamsLed by Samuel Adams Harassed stamp agentsHarassed stamp agents Daughters of LibertyDaughters of Liberty Stamp Act CongressStamp Act Congress Led by Patrick HenryLed by Patrick Henry “No taxation without representation”“No taxation without representation” Colonies begin to work as oneColonies begin to work as one Boycott on British GoodsBoycott on British Goods Parliament repeals the Stamp Act (1766)Parliament repeals the Stamp Act (1766)

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4 Declaratory Act (1766)Declaratory Act (1766) Parliament passes this act to show their powerParliament passes this act to show their power It gave parliament the right to make laws in the coloniesIt gave parliament the right to make laws in the colonies Townshed Acts (1767)Townshed Acts (1767) Placed duties on imports (Glass, Lead, Tea)Placed duties on imports (Glass, Lead, Tea) Colonists begin to show unrestColonists begin to show unrest 4000 British Troops are sent to Boston4000 British Troops are sent to Boston Boston Massacre (1770) *Boston Massacre (1770) * Five people are killedFive people are killed Colonists spread propagandaColonists spread propaganda

5 Committees of Correspondence *Committees of Correspondence * Communication linking the coloniesCommunication linking the colonies Tea Act (1773)Tea Act (1773) British East India Company was given permission to sell their tea to the colonies free of taxesBritish East India Company was given permission to sell their tea to the colonies free of taxes The merchants in the colonies were losing moneyThe merchants in the colonies were losing money Boston Tea Party (1773) *Boston Tea Party (1773) * 15,000 pounds of tea was dumped into the Boston Harbor15,000 pounds of tea was dumped into the Boston Harbor

6 Intolerable Acts (1774) (Coercive Acts)Intolerable Acts (1774) (Coercive Acts) George III closes Boston HarborGeorge III closes Boston Harbor Thomas Gage is appointed Governor ofThomas Gage is appointed Governor of MassachusettsMassachusetts He places Boston under Martial LawHe places Boston under Martial Law First Continental Congress (1774)First Continental Congress (1774) Declaration of colonial rightsDeclaration of colonial rights Formed MilitiasFormed Militias Continued the BoycottContinued the Boycott Promised to meet again if needs were not metPromised to meet again if needs were not met

7 *Battle of Lexington and Concord (1775)*Battle of Lexington and Concord (1775) Lexington:Lexington: 8 minutemen are killed8 minutemen are killed 1 British solider killed1 British solider killed Concord:Concord: On the way back from Lexington 4000On the way back from Lexington 4000 Minutemen opened fire on the BritishMinutemen opened fire on the British

8 Second Continental Congress (1775)Second Continental Congress (1775) Continental Army was formedContinental Army was formed George Washington is named commander *George Washington is named commander * Declaration of Independence is drafted *Declaration of Independence is drafted *

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10 Declaration of Independence (July 4, 1776)Declaration of Independence (July 4, 1776) T. Jefferson believed humans had an unalienable right to be free (life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness)T. Jefferson believed humans had an unalienable right to be free (life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness) John Locke (Natural Rights)/Montesquieu (Separation of Powers)John Locke (Natural Rights)/Montesquieu (Separation of Powers) They were declaring independence to the worldThey were declaring independence to the world Committee to draft the Declaration:Committee to draft the Declaration: Thomas Jefferson (Virginia)Thomas Jefferson (Virginia) John Adams (Massachusetts)John Adams (Massachusetts) Roger Sherman (Connecticut)Roger Sherman (Connecticut) Robert Livingston (New York)Robert Livingston (New York) Benjamin Franklin (Pennsylvania)Benjamin Franklin (Pennsylvania)

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12 Four Parts to the Declaration of IndependenceFour Parts to the Declaration of Independence IntroductionIntroduction Declaration of Rights (Natural Rights)Declaration of Rights (Natural Rights) List of complaints against the KingList of complaints against the King Resolution of IndependenceResolution of Independence Battle of Bunker Hill (June 1775)Battle of Bunker Hill (June 1775) British attempt to take the hillBritish attempt to take the hill British finally win on the third attackBritish finally win on the third attack British lose over 1000 menBritish lose over 1000 men Colonists lose 300 menColonists lose 300 men

13 Olive Branch Petition (July 8, 1775)Olive Branch Petition (July 8, 1775) Last attempt at peaceLast attempt at peace George III rejects itGeorge III rejects it Common SenseCommon Sense Thomas PaineThomas Paine A pamphlet written to encourage independenceA pamphlet written to encourage independence 500,000 copies sold500,000 copies sold Battle of Trenton (1776) *Battle of Trenton (1776) * New JerseyNew Jersey George Washington crosses the Delaware RiverGeorge Washington crosses the Delaware River Makes a surprise attack on the HessionsMakes a surprise attack on the Hessions Colonist victory increases moraleColonist victory increases morale

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15 The Fight for Philadelphia (1777)The Fight for Philadelphia (1777) British General Howe takes the capitalBritish General Howe takes the capital Continental Congress has to fleeContinental Congress has to flee Battle of Saratoga (1777)Battle of Saratoga (1777) British General Burgoyne marches toward New YorkBritish General Burgoyne marches toward New York Runs into hard terrain and get held upRuns into hard terrain and get held up Colonial General Gates and his troops are waiting for Burgoyne at SaratogaColonial General Gates and his troops are waiting for Burgoyne at Saratoga Burgoyne is forced to surrenderBurgoyne is forced to surrender Patriots gain moralePatriots gain morale France decides to join the American Cause (turning point of the war)France decides to join the American Cause (turning point of the war)

16 Winter at Valley Forge *Winter at Valley Forge * PennsylvaniaPennsylvania Continental Army struggles to stay alive in frigid winterContinental Army struggles to stay alive in frigid winter Friedrich Von Struben is brought in to turn the Continentals into a fighting forceFriedrich Von Struben is brought in to turn the Continentals into a fighting force Life during the WarLife during the War PatriotsPatriots LoyalistsLoyalists British BlockadeBritish Blockade Inflation increases (continental was worthless)Inflation increases (continental was worthless) Profiteering (price gouging)Profiteering (price gouging)

17 Battle of Yorktown (1781) *Battle of Yorktown (1781) * American and French join forces (Marquis de Lafayette)American and French join forces (Marquis de Lafayette) The Continental Army corners the redcoats at the James RiverThe Continental Army corners the redcoats at the James River The Continentals bomb Yorktown for 1 monthThe Continentals bomb Yorktown for 1 month General Cornwallis surrenders to G. WashingtonGeneral Cornwallis surrenders to G. Washington Treaty of Paris (1783)Treaty of Paris (1783) The United States of America if officiallyThe United States of America if officially RecognizedRecognized America’s borders are set from the Atlantic toAmerica’s borders are set from the Atlantic to The Mississippi and from Canada to the FloridaThe Mississippi and from Canada to the Florida BorderBorder British troops were to be removedBritish troops were to be removed

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