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1. T HE Q UESTION How do materials get into and out of a cell? Even though they are very tiny, cells are complex living things. Cells must send out signals.

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Presentation on theme: "1. T HE Q UESTION How do materials get into and out of a cell? Even though they are very tiny, cells are complex living things. Cells must send out signals."— Presentation transcript:

1 1. T HE Q UESTION How do materials get into and out of a cell? Even though they are very tiny, cells are complex living things. Cells must send out signals to communicate with other cells and bring in nutrients from the outside world. Today you will answer the question above by exploring features of the cell membrane that allow it to act as a semi-permeable barrier. You will discover how the cell membrane helps the cell maintain homeostasis Next These materials are © 2012 K Maddox, Dulaney High School, all rights reserved. Photos from NIH Image Bank

2 2. I NFORMATION S OURCES Let’s get started! Use the following resources to help you become familiar with the construction of the cell membrane: Cell Membrane 1. Play the animation to see an overview of the cell membrane. 2. Step through the animation a SECOND time. As you do, draw the cell membrane in your notebook and label ALL of the parts. Phospholipids 1. At this point you have discovered that one of the major components of the cell membrane are phospholipids. 2. Draw a phospholipid in your notebook. 3. Label the hydrophilic and hydrophobic sections. Test yourself: Visit the page, Construction of the Cell Membrane and click NEXT to go through each of the slides.Construction of the Cell Membrane As you work, match the membrane parts with their functions below. (record these in your notebook) When you reach the questions, make sure that you have answered all 10 correctly before moving forward Next These materials are © 2012 K Maddox, Dulaney High School, all rights reserved. 1. Allow ions and other polar molecules to pass through the membrane 2. Only found in animal cell membranes 3. Span the entire membrane and serve as a receptor for the cell. 4. Found on the surface of the membrane, they help identify the cell 5. Allow water molecules to pass through the membrane Glycoprotein Channel Protein Pore Protein Fibrous (Integral) Cholesterol Parts Functions

3 3. T YPES OF T RANSPORT Active Transport Next These materials are © 2012 K Maddox, Dulaney High School, all rights reserved. There two main ways that cells move materials in and out through the membrane! Some ways require energy and others do not. Compare Active and Passive transport of materials using the resources indicated below. Passive Transport 1.What is passive transport? 2.What are the three forms of passive transport? a)O_________O b)D_________D c)F__________ D__________FD 3.Compare the molecules that can get through the membrane in passive transport to those that cannot. 4.What is a concentration gradient? Watch this animation if you need a hint. animation HINT! If you right-click on the animations as they are playing you can un-check PLAY to stop and record information in your notebook. 1.What is active transport? 2.What are examples of active transport? Watch this animation to see two types of active transport in action.animation 3.What are these two types called? 4.How are they similar? 5.How do they differ? 6.How do molecules move, relative to the concentration gradient, in active transport?

4 4. T HE A SSESSMENT : C REATE A V ENN D IAGRAM Next These materials are © 2012 K Maddox, Dulaney High School, all rights reserved. 1. Create a Venn Diagram in your notebook (or using this Venn Diagram maker) that compares Active and Passive transport of materials across a cell membrane. Venn Diagram maker 1. Show which processes do and do not use energy. 2. Indicate which direction molecules move relative to the concentration gradient for each type of transport. 3. Give examples of each type of transport. 2. Check the rubric to be sure you have included all of the important details.rubric Active Transport Passive Transport

5 5. E NRICHMENT A CTIVITIES Copy the box below onto your paper and draw a concentration gradient, where the concentration of molecules on the left is greater than that on the right. When, if ever, does diffusion of molecules end? Why is facilitated diffusion needed? What is the difference between a hypertonic and hypotonic solution? What is an isotonic solution? If a cell is placed in an isotonic medium, will there be net movement of water? Here are some web resources that may help you find answers to these questions: BrainPop for Active transport BrainPop for Passive transport Osmosis You can also go back to the resources from the previous slides for more links Next These materials are © 2012 K Maddox, Dulaney High School, all rights reserved. If you have finished early, you can explore active and passive transport in a little more detail and answer the questions below to earn some extra points. =111

6 6. T EACHER S UPPORT M ATERIALS Maryland State Curriculum Goal: Expectation 3.2 The student will demonstrate an understanding that all organisms are composed of cells which can function independently or as part of multicellular organisms. Indicator The student will explain processes and the function of related structures found in unicellular and multicellular organisms. Assessment limits: transportation of materials (role of cellular membranes; role of vascular tissues in plants and animals; role of circulatory systems) waste disposal (role of cellular membrane; role of excretory and circulatory systems) feedback (maintaining cellular and organismal homeostasis - water balance Teacher notes: This lesson is appropriate for the Cellular Biology Unit of the BCPS High School Biology curriculum. Students should be able to complete the activity in pairs during one or two class periods. Student computers will need access to the websites and animations linked in this presentation. Objective: Students will analyze parts of the cell membrane in order to identify structures involved in and characteristics of passive and active transport of materials in and out of living cells. All images from NIH Image BankNIH Image Bank These materials are © 2012 K Maddox, Dulaney High School, all rights reserved.

7 Rubric These materials are © 2012 K Maddox, Dulaney High School, all rights reserved. Venn Diagram: Cell Membrane and Transport of Materials Teacher Name: Ms Maddox Points CATEGORY4321 Venn Diagram- Overall All aspects of Active and Passive transport are clearly indicated in the Venn Diagram. Diagram is clear and organized. One or two terms are missing. Several important points are missing and no comparison of similarities is made. Venn Diagram is unorganized and difficult to read. Energy Energy for Active and Passive transport is addressed correctly. One error in the requirement for energy. Two errors.Energy is not addressed in the Venn Diagram Direction of molecule movement Direction of molecule movement, relative to the concentration gradient is appropriately labeled. One error in direction of movement. Several errors in movement of molecules. Movement of molecules relative to concentration gradient is not addressed. Examples At least two examples are given for active and passive transport. Only 1 example is given for each type of transport. Examples for only one type of transport (passive or active) are given. Examples of passive and active transport are not addressed in the Venn Diagram. Venn Diagram Scoring Rubric


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