Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

1st MEETING Assignment 1 Assignment 2 A “Self Visualization” Assignment 2 B “Creating Standards” Assignment 3 “Discovering Grids” Quiz Create an artwork.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "1st MEETING Assignment 1 Assignment 2 A “Self Visualization” Assignment 2 B “Creating Standards” Assignment 3 “Discovering Grids” Quiz Create an artwork."— Presentation transcript:

1 1st MEETING Assignment 1 Assignment 2 A “Self Visualization” Assignment 2 B “Creating Standards” Assignment 3 “Discovering Grids” Quiz Create an artwork that visually represents your self image. You are free to use any style of visualizations and coloring media. Make a documentation of visual communications design related objects as much as possible, such as posters, brochures, logos, newsletters, magazines, print ads, business cards, etc. From some design examples, analyze and show the grid systems and its elements.

2 Is it Art or is it a Visual Communication Design? What do they have in common? Andy Warhol, Campbell’s Soup Can (15 minutes to think then present your answers)

3 Three essentials components that makes a work of art SUBJECT “what” CONTENT “why” FORM “how” Source: Art Fundamentals, pg. 13

4 TERMINOLOGY Subjects “what” Form “how” Content “why” Is a person, a thing, or an idea. The arrangement of elements in an artwork according to the principles that foster unity. The total appearance or organization. The emotional and intellectual message of an artwork. Source: Art Fundamentals, pg

5 SUBJECT – FORM – CONTENT A FACE | “HAPPY” | LOGO

6 How convey message visually (semiotics) WHAT ARE WE GOING TO LEARN IN VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN 1 ? The functions of Visual Communication Design are: to identify, to inform, to persuade/to express, to remind.

7 Some examples of Visual Communication Design Logo is used to identify an event, an idea, a person, a corporation, etc.

8 Poster, Brochures, Flyers, Magazine designs, etc. That is used to inform an event, an idea, etc.

9 Poster, Broschures, Flyers, Magazine designs, etc. That is used to persuade/to express an idea

10 Billboard advertisement that is used to remind of a product

11 Is it good or bad..??

12 What have you learn from 2D/3D ? design ELEMENTS DOT | LINES | SHAPE | VALUE| TEXTURE | SPACE| SIZE | COLOR design PRINCIPLES (A)SYMMETRY | PROXIMITY | CONTRAST | UNITY | REPETITION | VISUAL HIERARCHY | DYNAMICS | EMPHASIS LAYOUT & COMPOSITION BALANCE | RHYTM | EMPHASIS | UNITY

13 1st MEETING Assignment 1 Assignment 2 A “Self Visualization” Assignment 2 B “Creating Standards” Assignment 3 “Discovering Grids” Quiz – Basic Principles of Design Create an artwork that visually represents your self image. You are free to use any style of visualizations and coloring media. Make a documentation of visual communications design related objects as much as possible, such as posters, brochures, logos, newsletters, magazines, print ads, business cards, etc. From some design examples, analyze and show the grid systems and its elements.

14 QUIZ-DESIGN PRINCIPLES

15 design PRINCIPLES QUIZ Match the pictures below with these answers: (A)SYMMETRY | PROXIMITY | CONTRAST | UNITY | REPETITION | VISUAL HIERARCHY | DYNAMICS | EMPHASIS

16 TERMINOLOGY PROXIMITY VISUAL HIERARCHY The basic theory of proximity is concerned with the arrangement or categorisation of elements that relate to one another. To understand why, when elements of a similar nature are grouped together the information becomes a visual unit. This provides a viewer with a visual clue as to the concept you are communicating rather than being confronted with a scattering of unrelated graphical elements. Visual Hierarchy arranges elements to create focal points by positioning their priority within a concept as a whole. To do this you will need to ask yourself what the key elements of your design are, which graphics communicate your concept most strongly? Which graphics support your concept and how could you illustrate them to create a visual structure from most to least important? You may consider displaying your graphics using different sizes and colours to give them visual weight.

17 TERMINOLOGY SYMMETRY/ ASYMMETRY The principle of alignment focuses on the placement of graphical elements and their relationship to each other and as a whole. Following the principle of proximity, alignment allows a visual connection with elements in your design to be formed even if they are not close in proximity. Alignment helps to create unity and balance. Balance is the concept of visual equilibrium. It is the combination of opposing elements in a composition that results in visual stability. Most successful compositions achieve balance using symmetry or asymmetry. Symmetry refers to the organisation of elements in which a balanced visual hierarchy is achieved through the alignment of graphics along a horizontal or vertical axis. This means that your design can be reflected precisely over a central axis like a mirrored image. In contrast, design elements that display an unbalanced visual weighting that are made up of elements differing in size, colour and shape are organized and positioned against one another to create asymmetry.

18 TERMINOLOGY CONTRASTAn effective use of contrast enables you to add interest to your design by highlighting specific graphic elements. This will result in a more visually striking composition. To achieve this 'contrast' is employed as a means of creating a visual hierarchy among different graphic elements. It can be applied to graphic elements, as light, dark, warm, cool, large, small; etc. Contrast is most effective when it is strong; the focal point of a design is usually a result of contrast where the eyes will naturally be drawn. Here contrast can be used to direct the focus of a composition. When used as a device to emphasize or highlight design elements it is important to remember that an ineffective use of contrast may result in confusion.

19 TERMINOLOGY DYNAMICSDynamics is the arrangement of visual elements in a composition to suggest the illusion of movement or direction. The effective use of dynamics in a design can add an emotive characteristic to your design making it appear restful and calming or active and energetic. Dynamics can exist in four basic forms: Rhythmic: A steady rhythm that creates predictability and order in a composition. Arrhythmic: Follows an unstructured rhythm to add visual interest to a composition. Random: Without a structured approach or a defined order that creates spontaneity in a composition. Directional: The use of graphic elements used in such as way that implies a visual connection to lead the eyes to move in a particular direction. Creating a dynamic composition involves the use of patterns or the repetition of graphic elements and movement to be effective in its execution. The suggestion of motion by the use of repeated structures creates dynamics.

20 TERMINOLOGY REPETITION UNITY Repetitive elements throughout a design piece can be used to enhance and clarify information. Repetition adds visual interest to your design, and helps to identify elements that belong together. It can be considered a way of adding consistency to your design. The consistent repetition of graphic elements works to create visual unity. These elements can be as simple as colour, spatial relationships, a shape, a texture or a typeface. Sometimes repetitive elements are not identical in appearance but are in fact so similar that their connection is clear. Unity is the underlying principle that sums up all of the principles and elements of design. Unity refers to the combination of all elements successfully working together to achieve a sense of harmony in your design. This can be achieved through the consistent use of graphic elements. Using repetition or patterns is one of the most basic factors in creating a strong sense of unity.

21 TERMINOLOGY EMPHASISEmphasis refers to the focal point or centre of interest of a composition. This is an area that is visually dominant and eye-catching that a designer has emphasized through the clever placement of graphic elements. Used effectively in combination with the principle of visual hierarchy 'emphasis' can assist to establish a primary focus and an alternative secondary emphases in another area of the composition. Emphasis can be achieved by use of repetition to highlight and draw attention to a repetitive element. When used with 'repetition' the emphasis is usually a break in the basic structure or visual rhythm of a pattern that causes your eye to pause or focus on a particular element. Contrast achieves emphasis by accentuating an area to visually separate one element from another. Contrast in color, texture, scale, or shape attracts attention to a definite area, which may consist of strategically positioned graphics to call attention to a single element of your design. Source: Swinburne University

22 design PRINCIPLES QUIZ answers Match the pictures below with these answers: (A)SYMMETRY | PROXIMITY | CONTRAST | UNITY | REPETITION | VISUAL HIERARCHY | DYNAMICS | EMPHASIS PROXIMITY (A)SYMMETRY CONTRAST UNITY REPETITION VISUAL HIERARCHY DYNAMICS EMPHASIS

23 LAYOUT & COMPOSITION BALANCE | RHYTM | EMPHASIS | UNITY FROM 8 PRINCIPLES ABOVE, INFER 4 ESSENTIAL PRINCIPLES

24 Some examples of BALANCE

25

26 BALANCE Definition : How to create balance : An equal distribution of weight. Repeat a specific shape at regular intervals, either horizontally or vertically. Center elements on a page. Put several small visuals in one area to offset a single large visual or block of copy. Use one or two odd shapes and keep the rest “regular” shapes. Lighten a text heavy piece with a bright, colorful visual. Leave ample white space around large blocks of copy or very dark photos. Have a large light area near the center of your piece while putting a small dark area near the edge. Offset a big, dark photo or illustration with several small bits of copy, each surrounded by plenty of white space Devide your page into an equal number of columns or horizontal rows. Source: Making A Good Layout, pg

27 Some examples of RHYTHM

28

29 RHYTHM Definition How to create balance A pattern created by repeating elements that are varied. Repeat a series of similiarly shaped elements along the same baseline, with even white spaces between each (regular rhythm). Repeat a series of progressively larger elements with larger white spaces between each (progressive rhythm) Make all the text the same size (in the same-sized columns or boxes but make the pictures different sizes (repetition with variation) Alternate dark, bold type and light, thin type. Alternate dark pages (with lots of type or dark pictures) with light pages (with less type or light-colored pictures) in a brochure. Repeat a similar shape in various areas of a layout. Repeat the same element in the same place on every page of a newsletter so the reader moves steadily through it. (Repeat a reduced version of the nameplate at the top.) Use a lot of elements with tight spacing between them, ora few elements with loose spacing between them. Source: Making A Good Layout, pg

30 Some examples of EMPHASIS

31

32 EMPHASIS Definition How to create balance What stands out most gets noticed first. Place a small element, such as a line of reversed type or a small photo, in the middle of a large area of black or white. Surround an illustration with a lot of text. Use a series of evenly spaced, square photos, next to an unusual shape. Put an important bit of copy on a curve or an angle while keeping all the other type in straight columns. Use bold, black type for a head or sub head and much lighter type for all other text. Place a large picture next to a small bit of copy. Put a shape that appears to be three dimensional or a black n white photo against a field or flat color. Reverse the headline out of a black or colored box. Used colored type or an unusual face for the most important information. Put alist of benefits or a sidebar (a short article that supports a longer one) in a tinted box. Source: Making A Good Layout, pg

33 Some examples of UNITY

34

35 UNITY Definition How to create balance All the elements look like they belong together. Repeat a color, shape or texture in different areas of a spread or throughout a brochure. ( make all the photos circular or oval ). Group elements, such as a related headline, body copy, picyure and caption, together. Pick visuals that share a similar color, theme or shape. Iine up photos and copy along the same grid line(s). Throughtout a piece. Stick to one or two type families, varying only size or weigth for contrast throughout a brochure or newsletter. Keep the type style you select for heads, body copy photo captions and callouts consistent throughout. Use the same color palette throughout. Place callouts ( quotes or sentences that summarize a piece, also called “ pull quotes “ ) near the section of type from which they were taken or to which they apply. Put a border around a poster, page or spread. Group elements with lines, screens or tints Source: Making A Good Layout, pg

36 LAYOUT & COMPOSITION BALANCE | RHYTM | EMPHASIS | UNITY How to create a design using 4 principles above? Layout & Composition Design using GRID SYSTEM

37 GRID SYSTEM consist of Head Margin Foot Margin For-edge MarginBack Margin Column 1Column 2 Gutter Flowlines

38 Column 1 TYPES OF GRID SYSTEMS Single-Column Grids Multiple-Column Grids Modular Grids Alternative Grids

39 Column 1 TYPES OF GRID SYSTEMS Single-Column Grids Multiple- Column Grids Modular Grids Alternative Grids Column 2

40 TYPES OF GRID SYSTEMS Single-Column Grids Multiple-Column Grids Modular Grids Alternative Grids

41 Column 1 TYPES OF GRID SYSTEMS Single-Column Grids Multiple-Column Grids Modular Grids Alternative Grids

42 The anatomy of a PAGE LAYOUT Heads Sub Heads Running head Folio Callouts Crosshead Putu Anandi Nusraini dengan pakaian tradisional Caption

43 Analyzing GRID SYSTEM Putu Anandi Nusraini dengan pakaian tradisional HEAD/ HEADLINES Column 1 Column 2 IMAGE

44 1st MEETING Assignment 1 Assignment 2 A “Self Visualization” Assignment 2 B “Creating Standards” Assignment 3 “Discovering Grids” Quiz Create an artwork that visually represents your self image. You are free to use any style of visualizations and coloring media. Make a documentation of visual communications design related objects as much as possible, such as posters, brochures, logos, newsletters, magazines, print ads, business cards, etc. From some design examples, analyze and show the grid systems and its elements.


Download ppt "1st MEETING Assignment 1 Assignment 2 A “Self Visualization” Assignment 2 B “Creating Standards” Assignment 3 “Discovering Grids” Quiz Create an artwork."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google