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Felisa Zen. Aim  To find out what mass of baking soda reacted with 10mL of vinegar will produce the greatest volume of carbon dioxide in a 100mL eudiometer.

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Presentation on theme: "Felisa Zen. Aim  To find out what mass of baking soda reacted with 10mL of vinegar will produce the greatest volume of carbon dioxide in a 100mL eudiometer."— Presentation transcript:

1 Felisa Zen

2 Aim  To find out what mass of baking soda reacted with 10mL of vinegar will produce the greatest volume of carbon dioxide in a 100mL eudiometer tube

3 Background information  Baking soda is a base scientifically known as sodium bicarbonate NaHCO 3  Vinegar is dilute acetic acid CH 3 COOH  When sodium bicarbonate and acetic acid are reacted, they produce a double displacement acid-base reaction

4 Chemical Equation  NaCH 3 COO is a salt known as sodium acetate  H 2 CO 3 is an unstable carbonic acid which quickly decomposes and breaks down into H 2 O and CO 2  Therefore, after the decomposition, the reaction would look like this: NaHCO 3(aq) + CH 3 COOH (aq)  NaCH 3 COO (aq) + H 2 CO 3(aq) NaHCO 3(aq) + CH 3 COOH (aq)  NaCH 3 COO (aq) + H 2 O (l) + CO 2(g)

5 What actually happens?  The acetic acid reacts with the basic sodium bicarbonate  carbonic acid  Carbonic acid  carbon dioxide and water “eruption” (foaming, bubbling, fizzing, crackling) from CO 2 escaping the reacted solution  Only component left in the container: dilute solution of sodium acetate in water ○ NaCH 3 COO

6 Hypothesis After Calculations  10mL of acetic acid v = 0.010L c = 0.5M n = 0.005moles NaHCO 3(aq) + CH 3 COOH (aq)  NaCH 3 COO (aq) + H 2 O (l) + CO 2(g)  Sodium bicarbonate n = 0.005moles (same number of moles as acetic acid) M = (3)16 = 84g mol -1 m = 0.42g This should be the mass of sodium bicarbonate needed to react with 10mL of acetic acid to produce the greatest volume of carbon dioxide

7 Table 1: Volume of Carbon Dioxide Produced by the Different Quantities of Baking Soda Reacted with 10mL of Vinegar Mass of NaHCO 3 (g ± 0.001) Volume of CH 3 COOH (mL ± 0.01) Volume of CO 2 (mL ± 0.1) Trial Trial Trial Trial Trial Trial Trial

8 Mass of NaHCO 3 (g)Observations One large gas bubble rises, followed by a train of gas bubbles rising up steadily into the eudiometer tube, one after another One large gas bubble rises, followed by a train of gas bubbles rising up steadily into the eudiometer tube, one after another One large gas bubble rises, followed by a train of gas bubbles rising up steadily into the eudiometer tube, one after another One large gas bubble rises, then more gas bubbles rise up steadily but at a faster pace than the previous mass of baking soda (2g) One large gas bubble rises, then more gas bubbles rise up even faster than the previous mass of baking soda (1g) One large gas bubble rises, followed by a train of gas bubbles rising up steadily into the eudiometer tube, one after another, similar to the trial with 4g of baking soda 0.350On large gas bubble rises, followed by a train of gas bubbles rising up steadily into the eudiometer tube, one after another, at a slower pace than all previous trials Table 2: Observations of Carbon Dioxide Produced by 10mL of Vinegar Reacted with Different Quantities of Baking Soda

9 Graph 1: Volume of CO 2 (mL) Produced by the Reaction Between Baking Soda (NaHCO 3 ) and Vinegar (CH 3 COOH)

10 Processing Data  n=m/M Calculations for moles of NaHCO 3 ○ Trial 1: 4.039/84 = mol ○ Trial 2: 3.028/84 = mol ○ Trial 3: 2.062/84 = mol ○ Trial 4: 1.050/84 = mol ○ Trial 5: 0.520/84 = mol ○ Trial 6: 0.437/84 = mol ○ Trial 7: 0.350/84 = mol Calculations for moles of CH 3 COOH ○ All Trials: 10.00/60 = mol

11 Graph 2: Comparing Ratios Between Different Moles of Baking Soda Based on Its Mass to Moles of Vinegar

12 Sample Calculations of Errors and Uncertainties for the Reaction Between 0.520g of NaHCO 3 and 10mL of CH 3 COOH  Percent Uncertainty (0.001/0.520)*100 = 19.23% (0.1/95.6)*100 = 10.46% = 29.69% ≈ 30%  Percent Error Experimental value ○ 95.6mL of CO 2 Theoretical value ○ 1mole = 24.5L ○ mole = 0.152L ○ 0.152L = 152mL ○ (( )/152)*100 = 37.11% ≈ 37%

13 Conclusion  Increasing trend line: suggests that masses of baking soda below 0.5g increases rapidly in carbon dioxide production until it reaches 0.5g  Decreasing trend line: suggests that from the highest point of carbon dioxide production (with 0.5g of baking soda) onwards, the production of carbon dioxide from the reaction into the eudiometer tube decreases steadily as the mass of baking soda is increased  Theoretical calculations under “Processing Data” indicate that the results of the experiment support the calculated and compared molar ratios of baking soda to vinegar, however, the pattern in the production of carbon dioxide from the reaction between baking soda and vinegar is flipped when graphed for the ratios of different masses of baking soda to vinegar. This signifies that the greater the molar ratio of baking soda to vinegar, the lower the production of carbon dioxide during the reaction between baking soda and vinegar will be

14 Evaluations  Accuracy and precision in measurements of baking soda and vinegar It was difficult to get the accurate mass of baking soda to 3 decimal places through the electronic beam balance The vinegar was measured using a 25mL graduated cylinder, so the volume of vinegar was estimated merely through judgment of the naked eyes and is not very accurate nor precise  The surface area of baking soda was not controlled  There was a delay in the capturing of gas into the eudiometer tube  As the quantity of baking soda decreased, it got progressively trickier to simultaneously mind the pouring of the entire quantity of baking soda into the conical flask while minding the escape of gas released by the already started reaction of baking soda to vinegar as the baking soda meets the vinegar through contact little by little before the bung is attached to the flask, which resulted in the spilling of baking soda  By the time the amount of baking soda progressively decreased to a mass below 1.000g, perhaps due to the most reactive point of the reaction between baking soda and vinegar being in the very beginning of the reaction, and with the attachment of the bung to the conical flask being delayed, not all the gas produced by the reaction went into the eudiometer tube (especially in the beginning of the reaction), which may have produced inaccuracy in the recorded volume of carbon dioxide released into the eudiometer tube

15 Evaluations  In order to keep the surface area of baking soda a control in the experiment, use a spatula or a stirring rod to crush the baking soda into powder completely, leaving absolutely no clumps left  In order to prevent from having too much gas escaping the reaction before the conical flask is connected to the eudiometer tube, have a partner ready to attach the bung into the opening of the conical flask without delay after the respective mass of baking soda is poured into the conical flask with 10mL of vinegar  In order to get a more accurate measurement to keep the volume of vinegar a control in the experiment, use a pipette to measure 10mL of vinegar rather than a 25mL graduated cylinder  In order to get a more accurate measurement of baking soda throughout the experiment, use a spatula to control the three decimal places in the mass of baking soda being weighed on the electronic beam balance by adding or taking out very small amounts of baking soda from the container it is being weighed on

16 Works Cited Admin, Madsci. "Baking Soda Volcano." MadSciNet: The 24-hour Exploding Laboratory. Enigma Engines, 28 Jan Web. 13 May "Baking Soda and Vinegar Reaction and Demonstrations." Apple Cider Vinegar Benefits Web. 13 May Schultz, Joe. "Vinegar and Baking Soda." NEWTON: Ask A Scientist. Argonne National Laboratory. Web. 13 May "Vinegar + Baking Soda Explanation." Oracle ThinkQuest Library. Web. 13 May


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