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1 BEGINS Welcome to Transforming Transforming the urban schools. Beyond Restructuring: Real Work Reculturing and Retiming is where the Real Work.

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Presentation on theme: "1 BEGINS Welcome to Transforming Transforming the urban schools. Beyond Restructuring: Real Work Reculturing and Retiming is where the Real Work."— Presentation transcript:

1 1 BEGINS Welcome to Transforming Transforming the urban schools. Beyond Restructuring: Real Work Reculturing and Retiming is where the Real Work

2 2 A Warm Welcome to ALL

3 3 The CHALLENGE  Despite steadily increasing URGENCY… efforts-to-date to turn around the Nation’s lowest performing schools have largely FAILED.  5000 schools serving over 2,500,00 students are on track for RESTRUCTURING under NCLB legislation.

4 4 The Consequences are Devastating - Moments in America for Children  Every second a public school student is suspended.  Every 10 seconds a high school student drops out.  Every 17 seconds a public school student is corporally punished.  Every 25 seconds a child is arrested.  Every 21 seconds a baby is born to an unmarried mother.  Every 35 seconds a baby is born into poverty.  Every 36 seconds a child is confirmed as abused or neglected.  Every 41 seconds a baby is born without health insurance.  Every minute a baby is born to a teen mother.  Every 2 minutes a baby is born at low birthweight.  Every 5 minutes a child is arrested for a drug offense.  Every 9 minutes a child is arrested for a violent crime.  Every 18 minutes a baby dies before his first birthday.  Every 3 hours a child or teen is killed by a firearm.  Every 5 hours a child or teen commits suicide.  Every 6 hours a child is killed by abuse or neglect.  Every 14 hours a woman dies from complications of childbirth or pregnancy. *Facts and figures courtesy the Children’s Defense Fund

5 5 According to the Pew Center on the States:  The US has the greatest percentage of people in prison of any other country in the world…greater than China, India, Russia…

6 6 Including 1-in-9 African-American males ages 20-34

7 7 Albert Einstein  ‘The significant problems we face cannot be solved at the same level of thinking we were at when we created them.’ ‘The

8 8 The purpose of our session today is to share with you a unique model to transform one of the chronically lowest performing schools in New Jersey’s largest city, Newark… The Newton Street School

9 9  The Newark Star Ledger called it a Radical School Reform Model  One reporter called it ‘The grandest experiment the state has seen.’  The New York Times is running a four-part series of articles and this quote appears in the first article: ‘For one struggling urban school there is hope and a fresh start.’

10 10 ABC’s Eyewitness News has this to say…

11 11 Eckart Tolle, The Power of Now

12 12 T. S. Elliott  ‘ We must not cease from exploration and the end of all our exploring will be to arrive where we began and to know the place for the first time ’

13 13 Ron Edmonds  ‘We can whenever, and wherever we choose, successfully teach all children whose schooling is of interest to us. We already know more than we need, in order to do this. Whether we do it must finally depend on how we feel about the fact that we haven’t so far.’

14 14 The Basic Assumptions that Guided our Work:  We must diagnose, before we can prescribe.

15 15 NAESP School Survey Form  What are the three most persistent problems in your school that if solved, would significantly increase student success? Please briefly explain your response in the space provided.  Problem 1:  Problem 2:  Problem 3: Please use other side if more space is needed.

16 16 The Basic Assumptions that guided our Work:  We deeply and uncompromisingly believe in the educability of every child in every Urban school.

17 17 The Basic Assumptions that Guided our Work:  We believe that we had to be as anxious to avoid things that don’t work as committed to implementing things that do.

18 18 How to Ride a Dead Horse Common advice from knowledgeable horse trainers includes the adage: “If the horse you are riding dies, get off.” It seems simple enough but in education, we don’t always choose to follow that advice. Instead, we choose to:  Buy a stronger whip.  Appoint a committee to study the horse.  Say things like: “This is the way we have always ridden the horse.”  Come up with new styles of riding dead horses.  Blame the horse’s parents. The problem is in the breeding.

19 19 The Basic Assumptions that Guided our Work:  We must look inside the public school box (school, district, Union, community, state) and see it for the first time with new eyes and new possibilities.

20 20 The Four Basic Assumptions that Guided our Work   We must diagnose, before we can prescribe.  We deeply and uncompromisingly believe in the educability of every child in every Urban school.  We believe that we had to be as anxious to avoid things that don’t work as committed to implementing things that do.  We must look inside the public school box (school, district, Union, community, state) and see it for the first time with new eyes and new possibilities. v

21 21 Who are the PARTNERS?  Newton Street School - Willie Thomas, Principal.  Newark Public Schools (NPS) Central Office – Dr. Gayle Griffin, Assistant Superintendent.  Newark Teachers Union (NTU) - Joe Delgrosso, President.  Geraldine Dodge Foundation - Dr. Ross Danis, Education Officer.  The New Jersey Department of Education.  Seton Hall University (SHU) – Dr. Lourdes Zaragoza Mitchel and Dr. Charles Mitchel.

22 22 The Newton Street School: Portrait of a failing school  Seton Hall University was invited to lead the restructuring of the Newton Street School, a pre-K through 8 elementary school with an enrollment of 444 children.  Newton Street School is the second oldest school in the city and is located in the Central Ward.  Race: 93% black, 7% hispanic  Poverty: 61% eligible for free or reduced lunch  Special Education: 22%  In 2005, a state review revealed perennially low scores, poor professional-development training for teachers, a building in disrepair, and little to no analysis of testing data to guide future instruction.  Newton Street School was failing its children and teachers.

23 23 Newton Street School Students Passing State Tests – Elementary Total Students

24 24 Newton Street School Students Passing State Tests – Middle Total Students Newton Street School Students Passing State Tests – Middle Total Students

25 25 CENTRAL OFFICE PERSPECTIVES How can we increase the capacity of districts to support re-structuring of schools? What role should the central office play in removing obstacles to change? What institutional reconfiguring is needed to dramatically change support systems at the central office level?

26 26 Dr. Marion A. Bolden Superintendent Dr. Gayle W. Griffin Assistant Superintendent NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL PRINCIPALS CONFERENCE APRIL 7, 2008

27 27 2006 – 2007 Year 6 Schools Avon Avenue Burnet Street George Washington Carver Dr. E. Alma Flagg Rafael Hernandez Maple Avenue Newton Street Vailsburg Middle

28 28 2007 – 2008 Year 6 & 7 Schools Year 6 –Dr. Martin L. King –George Washington Carver – 6H –Dr. E. Alma Flagg – 6H –Maple Avenue – 6H –Avon Avenue – 6H Year 7 –Rafael Hernandez –Newton Street –Vailsburg Middle

29 29 Newark’s NCLB/CAPA Oversight Committee Comprised of school principals, district administrators, university partners, and Newark Teachers Union Established in Fall 2006 Provide oversight and technical assistance as schools strive to meet AYP Reduce school management prerogatives; increase district oversight and review of decisions

30 30 Newark’s NCLB/CAPA Oversight Committee Support achievement goals and provide access to realigned district resources Integrate accountability for student performance into the culture of schools Collaborate to ensure that all students are achieving, valuing rigor, high expectations, and high standards of performance

31 31 Newark’s Specific Interventions for Year 7 Schools Data Analysis Partnerships with Highly Skilled Professionals Professional Development Teacher Changes: Assess teachers’ needs Changes in Leadership Curriculum Emphasis Curriculum Interventions Governance Oversight and Prerogatives

32 32 Data Analysis SISS: School Year 2007 Grade Span SubjectPrevious Status 2006 HoldCurrent AYP 2007 Current Status 2007-08 ElementaryLYear 2NoYear 7 ElementaryMNANoYear 7 MiddleLYear 6NoYear 7 MiddleMYear 6NoYear 7

33 33 2007 Math – Elem (GE) Newton is 12 points below Benchmark -25 + 3.1 + 3.0

34 34 2006-2007 Math– Middle (GE) Newton is 2 points below Benchmark + 15.2 + 10.9 + 9.0

35 35 Partnerships with Highly Skilled Professionals University Partners Avon Avenue - Montclair State University George Washington Carver – Montclair State University Dr. E. Alma Flagg – Kean University Rafael Hernandez – Montclair State University Maple Avenue – Montclair State University Newton Street – Seton Hall University, NTU “New Newton” Vailsburg Middle – Seton Hall University – Stillman School of Business

36 36 Professional Development -New Jersey City University providing classroom- embedded professional development in Literacy -National Urban Alliance providing classroom- embedded professional development in Mathematics, Science, and Social Studies -Literacy and Math Coaches -Coached teachers in Guided Reading and “Coach the Coach” sessions for literacy coach -Conducted weekly grade level meetings and provided professional development on staff development days

37 37 Teacher Changes: Assess Needs of Teachers - Highly Qualified Teachers – Reducing Vacancies – Transfers – Assignments – Experience –Professional Development

38 38 Changes in Leadership -Avon – 1 st year – new principal -George Washington Carver –2 nd year -Dr. E. Alma Flagg –4th year -Rafael Hernandez –1 st year -Dr. Martin L. King –2 nd year -Maple Avenue –3 rd year -Newton Street –Veteran Principal -Vailsburg Middle –1 st year

39 39 Changes in Leadership Partnership with Seton Hall University and NTU and Dodge Foundation Redesigning Schools Seminar 3 day workshop for leadership team representatives – sponsored by NTU Provided System Thinking seminar for school leadership team

40 40 Curriculum Emphasis Language Arts Literacy Support Funded K-3 teachers in CLI training; Trained Reading Recovery teachers New core curricula in grades PK – 12 Comprehensive Assessment of Schools – CAPA Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment School climate and culture School leadership effectiveness

41 41 Curriculum Emphasis Mathematics Support –New adoptions PK - 12 –Math coaches in 24 low performing schools –Intensive professional development – after school and week- end institutes Science Support –Content-based summer institutes for lead science teachers –New adoptions of inquiry-based science programs – FOSS, STC –After school institutes for teachers

42 42 Curriculum Emphasis Special Needs Support –Inclusion Initiative –Special Education Literacy RTCs –Behaviorists in specific schools Professional Development Support - Resource Teacher Coordinators New Teacher Support

43 43 Curriculum Interventions Intervention curricula – READ 180 Reading Recovery Reading Intervention Kits for K - 5 Math manipulatives kits Mandatory tutoring

44 44 District Self Assessment Data Analysis External Partnerships Professional Development Human Resources Leadership Operations Fiscal Resources Governance

45 45 Newark Public Schools Strategic Plan Logic Model Objective: To improve student achievement on state assessments in Literacy, Mathematics and Science CONDITIONS Incremental growth is not sufficient to match trajectory needed to meet NCLB goals by 2014 Data are not consistently used to inform instructional decisions and implement best practices Level of curriculum implementation varies Lack of rigor, low expectations, varying degree of teacher content knowledge and pedagogy Low performing schools need attention and resources Current HRS functions and services do not enable us to meet recruitment needs; Teacher vacancies in critical content areas; Rising gang violence, high unemployment, and community challenges; Need to improve drop out and graduation rates; Need for systemic district-wide professional development for administrators to transform classroom practices and meet student needs; Unpredictable budget resources have created fiscal instability that works against district success; Special education operations hampered by limited resources, inadequate inclusion practices and non-accomplished IEP goals RESOURCES HUMAN NPS Staff: teachers, school leaders, students, parents, central office administrators and support staff INFORMATION -Data from assessment produces disaggregated data analysis -Strategic Plan with measurable goals, objectives and strategies to guide district progress -Updated Curriculum for all NJCCCS -Increased use of student work protocols -Monitoring of data from Walk Throughs to ensure implementation of curriculum FISCAL -General fund budget and grant sources -Aggressive pursuit of competitive grant funding -Impact of state funding due to economic downturn and new funding formula EXTERNAL PARTNERS Parents Foundations Universities Corporations Community agencies State, local, and federal governmental entities ACTIVITIES -Data Analysis of district and state assessments; -focus on differentiated student affective and cognitive needs: NCLB subgroups, gender, gifted and talented, at risk; -Professional development: Classroom-embedded coaching, modeling, teaching institutes -Grade Level Meetings/Collaborative Professional Learning Communities -Exemplary Lesson Planning and Design -Monitor implementation of district curriculum objectives, alignment, pacing, and program implementation plans -PK – 12 Vertical and horizontal articulation -Teacher Study and Focus Groups -Walk Throughs for implementation and accountability -Looking at Student Work Protocols -Principal Professional Development -Technology tools for teaching, monitoring, and managing -Multiple forums for community and partner empowerment and outreach to address community challenges OUTPUTS Increased level of consistent and effective curriculum implementation Ensure core curriculum intervention and enrichment opportunities meet diverse student needs Principal and teacher evaluations reflect use of data, implementation of curriculum, and serve as accountability for student achievement Increase special education inclusion to 25% Application of Systems Thinking in School Improvement Plans to align priorities, professional development and budget resources Teacher Vacancies reduced by 25% and early recruitment of mathematics and science teachers with contingency contracts by May 2008 Middle level teachers participate in cross content literacy professional development through Striving Readers’ grant and Middle Level Literacy Initiative Intensive support for low performing schools in staffing, professional development and principal supports SHORT TERM OUTCOMES -Students improve their literacy, mathematics, and science outcomes by 6%. -HS graduation rate is 82% with a 10% reduction in the number of students passing through SRA. -More cohesive, consistent and effective alignment of curriculum implementation, professional development, and fiscal LONG TERM OUTCOMES -Meet NCLB Benchmarks by 2014 of 100% proficiency for all student subgroups in literacy, mathematics, and science. -HS Graduation rate is 90% with at least 75% of students passing HSPA and end of course examinations.

46 46 ACTIVITIES Data Analysis of district and state assessments; focus on differentiated student affective and cognitive needs: NCLB subgroups, gender, gifted and talented, at risk; Professional development; Classroom-embedded coaching, modeling, teaching institutes Grade Level Meetings/Collaborative Professional Learning Communities Exemplary Lesson Planning and Design Monitor implementation of district curriculum objectives, alignment, pacing, and program implementation plans PK – 12 Vertical and horizontal articulation Teacher Study and Focus Groups Walk Throughs for implementation and accountability Looking at Student Work Protocols Principal Professional Development Technology tools for teaching, monitoring, and managing Multiple forums for community and partner empowerment and outreach to address community challenges

47 47 OUTPUTS Increased level of consistent and effective curriculum implementation Ensure core curriculum intervention and enrichment opportunities meet diverse student needs Principal and teacher evaluations reflect use of data, implementation of curriculum, and serve as accountability for student achievement Increase special education inclusion to 25% Application of Systems Thinking in School Improvement Plans to align priorities, professional development and budget resources Teacher Vacancies reduced by 25% and early recruitment of mathematics and science teachers with contingency contracts by May 2008 Middle level teachers participate in cross content literacy professional development through Striving Readers’ grant and Middle Level Literacy Initiative Intensive support for low performing schools in staffing, professional development and principal supports

48 48 SHORT TERM OUTCOMES -Students improve their literacy, mathematics, and science outcomes by 6%. -HS graduation rate is 82% with a 10% reduction in the number of students passing through SRA. -More cohesive, consistent and effective alignment of curriculum implementation, professional development, and fiscal resources

49 49 LONG TERM OUTCOMES -Meet NCLB Benchmarks by 2014 of 100% proficiency for all student subgroups in literacy, mathematics, and science. -HS Graduation rate 90% with at least 75% of students passing HSPA and end of course examinations.

50 50 Newark’s Goals Reduce number of Year 6 & 7 Schools Continue district supports & interventions for schools in need of improvement Collaborative Professional Learning New Lesson Plans for better lesson design

51 51 CENTRAL OFFICE PERSPECTIVES How can we increase the capacity of districts to support re-structuring of schools? What role should the central office play in removing obstacles to change? What institutional reconfiguring is needed to dramatically change support systems at the central office level?

52 52 External Partner: The Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation Traditional v. Non-Traditional Role of a foundation involved in school renewal

53 53 Traditional Fund third party providers of programs Fund third party providers of programs This can lead to “programitice” This can lead to “programitice” Foundations may be well meaning but can contribute to an incoherent approach to teaching and learning Foundations may be well meaning but can contribute to an incoherent approach to teaching and learning

54 54 Non-Traditional Work closely at the school level to identify specific needs Work closely at the school level to identify specific needs Reach out to program providers and connect resources with needs Reach out to program providers and connect resources with needs Efforts are coordinated with district, school, and university efforts Efforts are coordinated with district, school, and university efforts

55 55 Exploring new partnerships Beyond the partnerships you already have in place, take a few minutes to brainstorm additional partnerships that could add value, increase effectiveness, and improves the overall quality of teaching and learning in your school Beyond the partnerships you already have in place, take a few minutes to brainstorm additional partnerships that could add value, increase effectiveness, and improves the overall quality of teaching and learning in your school

56 56 The Transformation Trifecta  Modified from The Effective Schools Research  Mass Insight Education and Research Institute

57 57 The Transformation Trifecta  Structured to Learn  Structured to Teach  Structured to Act

58 58 Culture and Climate Resist the impulse to dictate change Resist the impulse to dictate change Choose to engage teachers in deep conversation about what matters Choose to engage teachers in deep conversation about what matters Begin to meet regularly with groups of teachers Begin to meet regularly with groups of teachers Invest time to build trust Invest time to build trust

59 59 Culture and Climate Outcomes Create a rubric on what it means to be a professional Create a rubric on what it means to be a professional Identify the characteristics of what a learning community looks and sounds like Identify the characteristics of what a learning community looks and sounds like Distinguish between congeniality and collegiality Distinguish between congeniality and collegiality Identify “lay-ups” that can improve climate quickly such as decorations, clean hallways and bathrooms, ongoing study groups, professional library Identify “lay-ups” that can improve climate quickly such as decorations, clean hallways and bathrooms, ongoing study groups, professional library

60 60 Culture and Climate Action What specific steps can you take in your school to create or expand a culture of professionalism and collegiality that maintains a relentless focus on teaching and learning? What specific steps can you take in your school to create or expand a culture of professionalism and collegiality that maintains a relentless focus on teaching and learning?

61 61 Structured to Learn SSSSafe-Clean-Orderly PPPPoverty-Driven Challenges CCCClear Expectations TTTTeachers SSSStudents PPPParents CCCCollaborative, Professional Environment RRRRe-timing CCCCapital Improvements

62 62 Structured to Teach  Recruit/Develop Leadership  Knowledge  Skills  Character, Strength  Recruit/Develop Teachers  Pedagogy  Content  Assessment  Uncompromising Belief in Students’ Ability to Learn

63 63 Structured to Teach  Additional Teacher/Administrator Hours for Professional Development  Adjust Schedules for Maximum Time  Vertical/Horizontal Grade Level Meetings  Plan  Discuss  Share

64 64 Teaching and Learning How did we structure to teach?

65 65 Needs Assessment for a Purpose Classroom Observations of Actual Practices Classroom Observations of Actual Practices Review Lesson Plans Review Lesson Plans Focused Groups – Student Needs Focused Groups – Student Needs Student Data Student Data State, District, Teacher Tests State, District, Teacher Tests Attendance Attendance Tardiness Tardiness Mobility Mobility

66 66 What Data Revealed Need to Train Teachers and School Personnel to Analyze, Interpret, and Prioritize Data Need to Train Teachers and School Personnel to Analyze, Interpret, and Prioritize Data Design a System for Standards Driven Curriculum – i.e. Curriculum Mapping Design a System for Standards Driven Curriculum – i.e. Curriculum Mapping

67 67 What Data Revealed Establish a Consistent School/Classroom Management Plan Establish a Consistent School/Classroom Management Plan Focus on Reading Instruction Focus on Reading Instruction Read Alouds Read Alouds Vocabulary Development Vocabulary Development

68 68 Our Professional Learning Plan Job Embedded Job Embedded Research-based, Proven Solutions Research-based, Proven Solutions Supported by Coaching Model Supported by Coaching Model Shared Agreements Shared Agreements

69 69 Our Professional Learning Plan Teacher Implementation of New Methods Teacher Implementation of New Methods Without Support – 10% Without Support – 10% With Coaching – 85% With Coaching – 85% Knight, 2004 Knight, 2004

70 70 Conversation Protocol In teams of four 1. Select a timekeeper - number participants 2. Participant #1 has two minutes to share: Strategy that was discussed Strategy that was discussed One possible constraint or limiting condition One possible constraint or limiting condition One possible solution One possible solution 3. Participant 2-4 have one minute to respond to what Participant #1 has shared. ideas, thoughts, questions ideas, thoughts, questions

71 71 Professional Learning Plan Data Analysis and Interpretation Data Analysis and Interpretation Standards Driven Curriculum Standards Driven Curriculum Classroom Management and Student Motivation to Learn Classroom Management and Student Motivation to Learn Vocabulary/Concept Development Vocabulary/Concept Development

72 72 “A Word is a Label for an Internal Reality.” Academic Vocabulary Can Increase Student Achievement. Academic Vocabulary Can Increase Student Achievement. Strategies For Direct/Intentional Institution Of Vocabulary Strategies For Direct/Intentional Institution Of Vocabulary Examine NJCCS Vocabulary And Concept Development –Customized Word Lists Examine NJCCS Vocabulary And Concept Development –Customized Word Lists Non-linguistic Representation Non-linguistic Representation Classroom Instruction that Works - Marzano Classroom Instruction that Works - Marzano

73 73 Lessons Learned Start Small – Changing culture takes time. Start Small – Changing culture takes time. Build Capacity Build Capacity Begin with Core Issues – Must Prioritize Begin with Core Issues – Must Prioritize Listen to Data – Don’t get lost in too many details Listen to Data – Don’t get lost in too many details

74 74 Lessons Learned Be Patient but Persistent Be Patient but Persistent Give Ownership and Responsibility Give Ownership and Responsibility Change Requires Preparation and Hard Work Change Requires Preparation and Hard Work Accept that We Learn from Failure Accept that We Learn from Failure

75 75 Structured to Act The Governance Committee School Controls Four Critical Elements  People  Money  Time  Programs

76 76 Summary Transformational Big Ideas  Seeing Things with “New” Eyes  The Power of Partnerships  Union  Superintendent  School  Administrators  Teachers and Support Staff  Parents  Foundations/Community Organizations  University  Governance Committee  Memorandum of Understanding  Study Groups  Leadership - Structured to Act  Culture/Climate – Structured to Learn  Teaching/Learning – Structured to Teach

77 77 Moving Forward  Select One Idea that Resonated with You and that You Could Take Back to Your School  How Can You Begin the Conversation?  Initial Action Planning  Share at Your Table


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