Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Prepared by Integrated Work Sue Brundege (303) 516-9001, By observing the behavior of others we can obtain an understanding of their.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Prepared by Integrated Work Sue Brundege (303) 516-9001, By observing the behavior of others we can obtain an understanding of their."— Presentation transcript:

1 Prepared by Integrated Work Sue Brundege (303) , By observing the behavior of others we can obtain an understanding of their behavioral style. This behavioral picture can give us a wealth of information about communicating effectively. The DISC model provides a method for processing information about work behavior and adapting for effective communication. As you observe others, you can ask yourself two key questions to find the behavioral quadrant most likely to characterize this person’s behavior. Then use the following pages of detailed information to learn how to work effectively with that behavioral style. Improved Management and Communication Using the DISC Model (1) How does this person usually approach a challenge, more passively or aggressively? Generally, people will either approach problems “head on” or they will “wait and see” what unfolds before acting. Knowing this you can select the right or left side of the circle. (2) Is this person primarily focused on people or tasks? People have a tendency to focus on either tasks or people. Answering this question will allow you to select the top half or bottom half of the circle. D Driving for action and innovation. Results oriented, direct, pioneering S Steadily maintains harmony. Good listener, reliable, service-oriented I Influencing others for results. Enthusiastic, social, seeks interaction C Conscientiously focused on tasks. Compliance, quality control, data. Focused on Tasks Focused on People Aggressive or “Head On” Passive or “Wait and See” NOTE: The DISC method is non-judgmental. Everyone has all four characteristics in different proportions. The behavioral characterization says nothing about performance or capacity. It only speaks to behavioral style. Mapping Behavior Using the Wheel

2 Signs you need to adapt your communication style: Looks at watch Leans back in chair Attacks Begins to focus on another activity Aggressively Task Focused - The High “D” - Dominant Style Behavior You May Notice: Aggressively solves problems or meets challenges Has need for control Demanding of self and others May have short fuse Task oriented, seeks results Direct in communicating Fights back in response to conflict May interrupt or do other things while others are talking Pioneering, sees change as indicator of progress Relieves stress through physical activity Adapting Your Communication for Effectiveness: Strong handshake, direct eye contact, controlled gestures, lean toward them. Strong, confident and direct tone of voice, don’t waste time or “chit-chat.” Use words like: “Win”, “Lead the pack”, “Challenge”, “New”, and “Results.” Encourage them to express their ideas and opinions, and listen carefully. Limit expression of emotion or discussion of feelings. Allow them to make decisions - give options rather than ready-made decisions. If you disagree with their argument, be straightforward and say why you differ. D C SI Intensity More focus on persuading people More focus on facts and procedures Interpersonal communication: listening skills, tact and diplomacy Patience in working with others and letting things unfold; openness to others’ methods, ideas Team building: help them see the value of working with a team, appreciation for a diversity of skills Working with the High D: Allow freedom from control, supervision and details - don’t micromanage, or dwell on details unless they express interest. Expect impatience with the process. They may look for shortcuts or break the rules to accomplish results most efficiently. They may imply “The end justifies the means.” Don’t take conflict with the High D personally. Provide challenge and opportunity, allow them to pioneer new methods and ideas. Present facts logically, use facts to support an argument or specific examples. Evaluate on results, not process: the”what”, not the “how.” Clearly explain what results are expected. Learning More: Consider the person you are working with: How intense are they? Characteristics may be more pronounced in an intense person and more subtle in someone who is less intense. Do they also lean towards persuading people or facts and procedures? Read sections on “C” or “I” for more information. Recognizing a High D Behavioral Style Applying Knowledge of the High D Behavioral Style Developmental Areas Prepared by Integrated Work

3 Signs you need to adapt your communication style: Looks around, no eye contact Silence Skepticism, negativity Persuading and Promoting - The High “I” - Influencer Style I C S Behavior You May Notice: Extraverted, sociable, talkative Focus on relationships and interaction with others Uses a lot of gestures when communicating Will use influence and relationships with others to motivate and inspire them or accomplish goals May dominate the conversation, very verbal Enthusiastic and team oriented Will be warm and expressive Seeks fun experiences Relieves stress through social interaction and discussion Intensity More driving, blunt Adapting Your Communication for Effectiveness: Relaxed communication with friendly eye contact. Enthusiastic, friendly and energized tone of voice. Use humor and expressive gestures. Use words like: “Fun”, “Teamwork”, “I feel”, “Exciting”, “Makes you look good” Focus the conversation on the impact on people. Don’t move straight to business, warm up to the discussion with social conversation. Developmental Areas: Time or project management Setting goals, planning, following through Listening skills Working with the High I: Provide opportunities to use verbal skills and express ideas and opinions Allow them to work and interact with others, assign tasks that maximize their innate people skills, encourage them to use their people skills to resolve conflict Expect some disorganization or lack of attention to time schedules. Be clear about deadlines and timeframes that are critical. Set clear objectives of tasks to be accomplished, however allow freedom from tight controls - don’t micromanage Evaluate on results, not process: the “what”, not the “how.” Provide positive feedback by recognizing them for their abilities and accomplishments May by sidetracked by people issues, but they are good at solving people problems. May not notice change, doesn’t mind it. D More concerned about how others feel Recognizing a High I Behavioral Style Applying Knowledge of the High I Behavioral Style Learning More: Consider the person you are working with: How intense are they? Characteristics may be more pronounced in an intense person and more subtle in someone who is less intense. Do they also tend to be driving, or blunt or are they concerned about how others feel? Read sections on “D” or “S” for more information. Developmental Areas Prepared by Integrated Work

4 Signs you need to adapt your communication style: Asks you to repeat information Gently tries to end the meeting Stable and Supportive - The High “S” - Steadiness Style C I Behavior You May Notice: Generally quiet, but very good listeners People oriented, seeks harmony and steadiness Will usually listen first when communicating with others Works at a steady pace, reliable and focused May use “To Do” lists May display little or no emotion in general conversation Seeks to serve others, to help Does not back down easily when “right” Relieves stress through sleep or relaxation Intensity More focus on people More focus on rules, procedures Adapting Your Communication for Effectiveness: Relaxed with friendly eye contact, use warmth and small gestures. Friendly, soft tone of voice, slow pace, low volume. Use words like: “Help me out”, “Step by step”, “Steady.” Make an effort to get to know them. Assertiveness, willingness to take risks Long-term planning Discuss feelings when appropriate rather than internalize Help starting new assignments Working with the High S: Prepare them for changes, allow opportunity to finish tasks and receive closure. Capitalize on their excellent listening skills, desire for harmony, and eagerness to serve by assigning tasks that require those attributes. Provide a non-threatening work environment. Assign fewer, larger projects, with a long-term focus. Encourage their participation in meetings, draw out their thinking. Involve them in long-term planning, tap their need to serve and their organizational abilities. Clearly define parameters, requirements of tasks. Understand that their goals will be shorter term, low-risk. Over time you can develop mutual trust and work with them to stretch into new areas. S D Recognizing a High S Behavioral Style Applying Knowledge of the High S Behavioral Style Learning More: Consider the person you are working with: How intense are they? Characteristics may be more pronounced in an intense person and more subtle in someone who is less intense. Do they also lean towards persuading people or on rules and procedures? Read sections on “C” or “I” for more information. Developmental Areas Prepared by Integrated Work

5 Signs you need to adapt your communication style: Evasiveness Little or no verbal communication Tries to end meeting by asking difficult questions Conscientiously Task Focused - The High “C” - Compliance Style Behavior You May Notice: Task oriented, can seem removed from interpersonal interactions. Concerned about quality, standards, and procedures Seeks data, information Prefers work environment with few people, and little noise Will be direct and to the point when talking to others, uses questions to gather data and clarify information Excellent organizational skills, everything has a place May be introverted May overanalyze problems: analysis paralysis May be overly critical of others Relieves stress through alone time Adapting Your Communication for Effectiveness: Use facts and data to support your point, not opinions or feelings. Don’t bring poorly thought out plans or limited data to the table. Limit use of gestures, don’t invade their space. A controlled, thoughtful tone of voice is most effective. Use words like, “The Facts,” “No risks,” “Procedure,”and “Proven” Use direct eye contact. C D S I Intensity More focus on impacts of the plan on people More focus on strategy Negotiation, people skills Managing conflict rather than avoiding it Flexibility and adaptability to change Working with the High C: Allow plenty of time for the person to think and consider ideas. Do not ask for “on-the-spot” responses. Provide a work environment where critical thinking is needed and rewarded. Provide as much data and information as possible. Wherever quality is important, include them in planning and implementation. Prepare them for change, allow plenty of time to complete what has already begun. Provide work space with few distractions, low noise, few people. Clearly define the requirements of their position and expectations for performance. Encourage their participation in meetings: they may be reluctant to speak up. Encourage problem solving, and setting goals that lead them to stretch. Learning More: Consider the person you are working with: How intense are they? Characteristics may be more pronounced in an intense person and more subtle in someone who is less intense. Do they also focus on the impact of the plan on people or on strategy? Read sections on “S” or “D” for more information. Recognizing a High C Behavioral Style Applying Knowledge of the High C Behavioral Style Developmental Areas Prepared by Integrated Work


Download ppt "Prepared by Integrated Work Sue Brundege (303) 516-9001, By observing the behavior of others we can obtain an understanding of their."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google