Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

+ Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion CSSA Summer Institute 2014.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "+ Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion CSSA Summer Institute 2014."— Presentation transcript:

1 + Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion CSSA Summer Institute 2014

2 + Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion 1, 2, and 3 There are 3 sections that we offer at the institute related to the issue of diversity. Part I will emphasize individual voices of experience related to student’s accessing higher education. This section will highlight the panelist perspectives on systems we need to have to ensure student access. Part 2 will emphasis the larger statewide issues related to outcomes funding and the equity lens. Part 3 will provide a personal perspective about diversity and inclusion; and will emphasize both internal and external strategies to address the issues of inequality.

3 + Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion 1, 2, and 3 Remembering why we do this work: “[T]he diffusion of knowledge and opportunity through public institutions of higher education must be accessible to all individuals regardless of race or ethnicity … [E]nsuring that public institutions are open and available to all segments of American society, including people of all races and ethnicities, represents a paramount government objective. … And, ‘[n]owhere is the importance of such openness more acute than in the context of higher education.’ Effective participation by members of all racial and ethnic groups in the civic life of our Nation is essential if the dream of one Nation, indivisible, is to be realized.” Justice Sandra Day O’Connor in Grutter v. Bollinger (2003), premised in part on the Supreme Court’s unanimous Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954.

4 + Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion :00am to Noon What will we cover: 1. Primer related to the issues of Race, Ethnicity, Inclusion – and Otherness. There are many ways/lenses that can be used to view this issue. A particularly poignant backdrop comes from the State of Oregon’s report on Facing Race Report.pdf Report.pdf This focus not be as inclusive about all the types of otherness, it provides a good backdrop to some of the changes in Oregon. 2. A Panel Conversation regarding issues of access. We’ve asked 3 participants to provide a backdrop to access in the community college. Each panelist will discuss their immediate background serving students given their unique perspective. Approximately 5 minutes each. 3. Questions and Answers – Moderated by ? 4. Questions from the participants

5 + Facing Race – A Quick Overview Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion - 1 Introduction: This is Oregon’s first Racial Equity Report assessing the extent to which the 2011 Oregon Legislature This is Oregon’s first Racial Equity Report assessing the extent to which the 2011 Oregon Legislature. Some history: In 1843, the Oregon Territorial Legislature voted to ban slavery in the state, not because of a strong anti-slavery sentiment, but because early Oregon settlers wanted to create an all-White society that would be free of the “racial problems” threatening to cause civil war in the rest of the United States. Throughout the early 1900s, cities throughout Oregon adopted “sundown laws” that required Black people to leave the city limits by sundown. During the internment of Japanese Americans in World War II, the Portland Expo Center became a temporary detention center used to hold more than 3,600 people.

6 + Facing Race – A Quick Overview Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion - 1 Portland is the Whitest major city in the U.S. and new data shows the city has become more white to the core. Oregon has one of the highest proportions of White residents in the U.S. But Oregon (in the overall) is changing. Oregon’s communities of color have grown significantly. In 1990, people of color in Oregon were 9.2% of the population. In 2000, that number rose to 16.5%. In 2010, that number rose to 21.5%.

7 + Diversity, Inclusion, and Equity – 1 Facing Race Review The hard truth is Oregon faces stark racial disparities. Oregon’s communities of color are more likely to be sicker, have lower income, and experience poorer overall outcomes than White Oregonians. The lived experience of people of color in the state continues to break down along color lines: White women in Oregon earn an average of $34,152. Latina women in Oregon earn a full 40.5% less, while Asian American women earn 4.1% less. Wage disparities for communities of color cross many sectors of Oregon’s economy from manufacturing to service to clerical work. When doing the same jobs, Whites earn between 25-50% more than people of color. Oregon’s overall child poverty rate is 21.6%.In Multnomah County, while one in eight White children live in poverty, nearly one in three children of color live in poverty. For Native American children younger than 5, the poverty rate jumps to more than 55%. 67% of Whites own homes compared to 47% of people of color. Nationally, nearly 44% of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students of color report being harassed at school because of both their race and their sexual orientation or gender identity.

8 + Panel Conversation Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion – I (DEI) The focus on this section will be a Panel Conversation regarding issues of DEI. We’ve asked 3 participants to provide a backdrop to access in the community college. Each panelist will discuss their immediate background serving students given their unique perspective and to give a voice to the Panelist 1 – Klaudia Esquivel, Administrative Support Coordinator for ESL, Skills Development, GED, and Adult High School at Clackamas Community College. Panelist 2 – Melinda Bullen, is a new resident of the Pacific Northwest, relocating here to develop and coordinate the new Diversity Resource Center at Mt. Hood Community College. Panelist 3 – Aimee Elber, Coordinator of Disability Support Services at Clackamas Community College.

9 + DEI Moderated Questions and Answers What types of students should we be thinking about and what kinds of access do they need? What are the current concerns about Race and Ethnicity in Oregon today? What types of policies (federal, state, or institutional present barriers to student success? Focus on duplication of information needed to access system through FA, admissions, and registrations system, What types of policy changes are required to ensure equity, inclusion and diversity? Better K-12 partnerships, funding based on performance of success passing out of developmental sequences, outreach dollars and centers that focus on issues of diversity, multiplier funding in a performance model for low SES, Pell or diverse student body.

10 + Questions and Answers from Participants ??


Download ppt "+ Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion CSSA Summer Institute 2014."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google