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1 Faith-Based and Public Health Partnerships: Model Practices for Reaching Vulnerable Populations Presented by: Schuylkill County’s VISION Developed by:

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Presentation on theme: "1 Faith-Based and Public Health Partnerships: Model Practices for Reaching Vulnerable Populations Presented by: Schuylkill County’s VISION Developed by:"— Presentation transcript:

1 1 Faith-Based and Public Health Partnerships: Model Practices for Reaching Vulnerable Populations Presented by: Schuylkill County’s VISION Developed by: Interfaith Health Program, Emory University

2 2 This work is possible with Emory’s: Funding support and program content development partners: HHS Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships Association for State and Territorial Health Officials (ASTHO) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention All 10 participating community site leaders

3 3 Presentation Objectives: 1)Explain the rationale for public health and FBO partnerships 2)Provide an overview of a “Model Practices Framework” that includes:  Description of the model practices development  The framework and components  Examples of public health and FBO partnerships  Examples of toolkit content 3)Sets the stage for you to review all the practices and begin the application of the practices

4 4 I. Introduction The information provided in this toolkit is a set of model practices derived from an assessment of four years of successful work implemented in 10 different faith and community-based sites. The purpose of this information is to assist others in building and mobilizing partnerships that reach vulnerable, at-risk, hard to reach, and minority populations with needed influenza prevention and other essential public health promotion services. It may be useful if you want to... identify new partners; understand your capacity and/or the capacity of your partners in new ways; work more effectively with existing faith and community-based partners; and build partnership relationships that break through cultural, trust, and resource barriers to achieving health equity.

5 5 Rationale for Partnerships – Most Salient Factors 1)Faith-based organizations (FBOs) are pervasive social structures and institutions in communities – congregations, FBOs, health care, education, etc. 2)They hold a kind of trust that makes possible a unique access to particular populations 3)Their values and commitments may align with and can contribute to achieving public health goals

6 6 Rationale for Partnerships – Science CDC’s REACH U.S. identified the following key principles and supporting activities for effective community-level work to reduce health disparities in racial and ethnic minority communities:  Trust. Build a culture of collaboration with communities that is based on trust.  Community Investment and Expertise. Recognize and invest in local community expertise and motivate communities to mobilize and organize existing resources.  Trusted Organizations. Enlist organizations within the community that are valued by community members, including groups with a primary mission unrelated to health.  Community Leaders. Help community leaders and key organizations forge unique partnerships and act as catalysts for change in the community.

7 7 The Model Practices Framework 1)Brief background on the source of the practices 2)Some general guidance to making the model work for you 3)A description of the Model Practice Framework 4)A detailed look at the 2 essential elements of the model practices – definitions, case examples, and tips for implementation

8 8 Project Goal and History 2009 - 2013 Build and mobilize capacity within networks of faith-based and community organizations to demonstrate ways to expand reach to vulnerable, at-risk, and minority populations for prevention and treatment of influenza. Built on: CDC with IHP/Emory (‘01 to ‘07) trained 78 teams of religious and public health leaders in 24 states to collaborate on eliminating health disparities. HHS’ Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships work with IHP/Emory and 9 sites during 2009 H1N1

9 9 III. Ten Unique Multi-Sector Sites Chicago, IL Center for Faith and Community Health Transformation (Advocate Health Care and UIC) and Chicago Area Immunization Campaign (CAIC) Colorado Springs, CO Penrose-St. Frances Mission Outreach Detroit, MI United Health Organization Los Angeles, CA Taiwan Buddhist Tzu Chi Medical Foundation Lowell, MA Lowell Community Health Center Memphis, TN Methodist LeBonheur Center of Excellence in Faith and Health Minnesota Minnesota Immunization Networking Initiative (MINI) New York City, NY South Brooklyn Interfaith Coalition (Lutheran Health Care) Schuylkill County, PA Schuylkill County’s VISION St. Louis, MO Nurses for Newborns Foundation

10 10 III. Project Accomplishments 1)Capacity building across and beyond the 10 site network 2)Educating and vaccinating those with limited access 3)Evaluating and describing “what works” 4)Developing innovations and adaptations to assure reach at the local level

11 11 III. Model Practice Framework Development - Methodology A practice based discovery process using a modified Delphi technique to synthesize distinctive elements from across10 sites.  Document review and thematic analysis  In-person inductive identification of key elements of practice (4 of 10 sites)  On-line survey to validate key elements and characteristics (16 respondents across 10 sites)  9 site in-person mixed group work to develop definitions and operational characteristics

12 12 Model Development - Methodology PhaseActivitiesKey PlayersOutput I. Identification of preliminary dimensions Qualitative document analysis and review Emory staff and a site representative 160+ codes, themes describing the work II. Preliminary model development 1.5 day in-person iterative prioritization of key elements 4 site representatives and theory/ph science “experts” First draft of model with 25 elements III. Model validation 1.10 Site Survey 2.Two Day Meeting 3.Graphical Representation 4.Consensus Review Site community leaders and national partners “Final” Model! IV. Dissemination and further “testing” of the model

13 13 III. Model Guidance … Making it work for you Consider...  Could these elements assist you identifying new partners that would be instrumental in reaching particular populations?  Does this framework describe your capacity and/or the capacity of your partners in new ways?  How could these practices and capacities assist you in working more effectively with existing faith and community-based partners?  Could building these kinds of partnership relationships break through cultural, trust, and resource barriers to achieving health equity in your community?

14 14 III. The Model – its organizing components 1)Fundamental elements that are core drivers 2)Processes and activities 3)Infrastructure – capacities and structures

15 Inclusivity Model Practice Framework: 4 Core Drivers Trust in Community Compassion Driven Flexibility

16 Model Practice Framework: 5 Processes

17 Leadership Anchors the Work Model Practice Framework: Infrastructure Volunteers as Groundwork Circle of Core Partners External Networks Multisectoral Collaboration

18 Model Practice Framework Volunteers as Groundwork Circle of Core Partners External Networks Multisectoral Collaboration Leadership Anchors the Work Inclusivity Trust in Community

19 19 Model Practice Element Build and MaintainTrust Definition: Trust is primarily relational. It is built over time when respect for differences, commitment to the good of the community, integrity and transparency are experienced consistently in the face of challenging collaborative endeavors. How does one recognize and build this?  Make visible that this work is an expression of diverse faith commitments and shared concern for the well-being of all in the community.  Let people show their faith and respect others.  Trust is often assumed and ascribed to faith leaders and faith-based services. This should be acknowledged and honored in the collaborative work.  Trust is built through networks of partners when their priorities and the community’s needs are met.

20  Founded in 2011 after several years of working together on immunization projects  Core partners as founding partners: Interfaith Health Network, Schuylkill County’s VISION, Department of Health, Diakon Lutheran Social Ministries  Came together with awareness of community need, developed common vision, built common goals and shared resources  Respect for faith based mission for health  Open table for other members Schuylkill County PA Immunization Coalition

21 Finding resources in rural counties is much like “Stone Soup” at times. What we do when faced with insurmountable challenges is invite many partners to the table. What we inevitably find is that each of us brings some experience or piece of wisdom that creates the synergy to move the project forward. We also find the energy to persevere in the face of systems that are not designed to deal with disparities such as geographic isolation. A good example of this perseverance is our three year journey to find a solution to the problem of not having physicians who can write orders for numerous small clinics to serve the many small rural communities in our county. We have talked to officials at the local, state and national levels about this issue. All have been compassionate but most have said they never thought before about the problems in small isolated communities. As a solution, we have enlisted our Emergency Management Agency to help us in the 2013 flu immunization program. Look at this picture. Don’t these people look like they can make a great soup together? The Persevering Partners

22 Preserving Partners

23 23 Model Practice Element Keep Relationships and Presence as Paramount Definition: Give diligent and visible attention to relationship building with communities and partners by giving time, being present, listening and sharing power. How does one recognize and build this?  Be in the community, go to the community, be a presence in the community, and accompany community leaders.  Build formal and informal occasions in the collaborative work for listening, development of a common vision and shared decision making  Create spaces and interactions where it is accepted and people understand that their work can be an expression of their deepest values and faith commitments  Maintain contact

24 24 Nurturing Relationships  Continuing Contacts with Congregations  Listening and Addressing Concerns  New opportunities Food for body and soul In 2013 the Immunization Coalition worked with several congregational sites during food pantry openings. The relationships with some of these congregations began with previous public health work. Clients were very appreciative of the convenience. Some would not have been able to arrange transportation at another time.

25 25 III. Model Guidance … Making it work for you Consider...  Could these elements assist you identifying new partners that would be instrumental in reaching particular populations?  Does this framework describe your capacity and/or the capacity of your partners in new ways?  How could these practices and capacities assist you in working more effectively with existing faith and community-based partners?  Could building these kinds of partnership relationships break through cultural, trust, and resource barriers to achieving health equity in your community?

26 26 For more information Go to the Model Practice Workbook: Public Health and Faith Community Partnerships available at: http://ihpemory.org/2014/03/10/public-health- and-faith-community-partnerships-2/

27 27 IV. Resources and Further Information Interfaith Health Program, Emory University www.ihpemory.orgwww.ihpemory.org, www.interfaithhealth.emory.eduwww.interfaithhealth.emory.edu HHS Center for Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, http://www.hhs.gov/partnerships/ http://www.hhs.gov/partnerships/ Center for Faith and Community Health Transformation http://chicagofaithandhealth.org/ Center of Excellence in Faith and Health http://www.methodisthealth.org/about-us/faith-and-health/ ** Would welcome suggestions for more organizations, technical assistance sources, learning networks, and other tools

28 28 Kay Jones, Executive Director Schuylkill County’s VISION 1464B Route 61 South Pottsville, PA 17901 kjones@schuylkillvision.com 570-622-6097 www.ihpemory.org Very special thanks to -- ASTHO; the participating 10 sites; Emory University; and partners at the CDC and the HHS Partnership Center


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