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Operating a Wind Farm in the Future Smart Grid: Lessons from developing and deploying a Smart Grid on Shetland Presented by:Mr. Simon Gill (University.

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Presentation on theme: "Operating a Wind Farm in the Future Smart Grid: Lessons from developing and deploying a Smart Grid on Shetland Presented by:Mr. Simon Gill (University."— Presentation transcript:

1 Operating a Wind Farm in the Future Smart Grid: Lessons from developing and deploying a Smart Grid on Shetland Presented by:Mr. Simon Gill (University of Strathclyde) Contributing Authors: Prof. Graham Ault, Dr Ivana Kockar (University of Strathclyde) Dr. Colin Foote (Smarter Grid Solutions) Mr. Stewart Reid (Scottish and Southern Energy Power Distribution)

2 Introduction Active Network Management and the Smart Grid Rolling out ANM The Orkney Smart Grid - Description of an existing ANM scheme - Communication infrastructure - Contractual infrastructure - Lessons Learned Shetland smart grid - ANM on an islanded system - Managing wind with energy storage and flexible demand - Enhanced wind turbine requirements for Shetland - Lessons Learned

3 Active Network Management Centralised Control Distributed Control msmin Protection, Automation, Control SCADA Active Network Management ANM: close to real time monitoring and control of distribution networks and distributed generation s

4 Orkney Smart Grid Population: ~ 20,000 Electrical demand: 6 – 31 MW Existing renewable generation: 26MW Electrical connection: 2 x 20MW undersea cables

5 Orkney Smart Grid 2 x 20 MW undersea CablesDemand Min: 6MW Firm Wind: 26MW Intratrip controlled Non Firm Wind: 20MW New Non Firm Wind: 18.5MW

6 Orkney Communications Diagram courtesy of Smarter Grid Solutions

7 Orkney - Outcomes New Non Firm Capacity Installed so far: 18.5MW Cost of project ~ £0.5M (Projected cost of network reinforcement ~£30M) Advantages to Wind Generators: Significantly quicker connections and certainty of when connections available Lessons Learned: Communications reliability is paramount!

8 NINES – Shetland ANM Population: ~ 22,000 Electrical demand: 12 – 45 MW Existing renewable generation: 3.6MW Electrical network: Islanded Northern Isles New Energy Solutions

9 NINES – Shetland ANM Non-Firm Wind Battery energy storage Large scale demand management Domestic demand side management Frequency Responsive Objectives: 1.Maximise renewable generation 2.Define network stability 3.Smooth conventional generation 4.Frequency responsive components

10 Stability and Scheduling

11 Forecasting Scheduling Engine How do you use forecasts? -uncertainty - Real time-monitoring and control -rescheduling decisions - Identify potentially problematic forecasts (e.g. Wind speeds near wind turbine cut outs) Wind Forecast Fixed Demand Forecast Flexible Demand Forecast

12 NINES for Developers Last In First Out (LIFO) Principle – of – access Advantages: -Bankable - Easy to understand - New connections don’t affect your expected curtailment Dis-advantages: -All capacity to a few generators -Does not maximise viable capacity Example of Curtailment Connecting together with demand - ‘Private’ flexible demand → reduce curtailment -NINES example: electric boiler for district heating

13 NINES: Connection Process Initial expression of interest Initial feasibility study provided Formal Connection Request: Requires Planning permission Feasibility Study includes: -The connection process -Communication requirements -ANM equipment requirements -Details of connections and costs -Fault ride through, protection and additional technical requirements -Constraint analysis estimate Accept connection offer: Developer signs agreement and pays full connection charge Generation must go live within 2 year period Defines position in LIFO queue Generator to comply with ANM control signals Formal Connection Offer: Includes revised constraint analysis

14 Rolling out ANM Key Lessons ANM can be quicker, many times cheaper and make more efficient use of capacity Communications reliability is vital Wind farm projects in ANM schemes are bankable under well defined principles of access Direct linkage with demand will reduce curtailment Wind turbines will be asked to provide additional distribution services The future ANM moving towards ‘business as usual’ on rural distribution networks in Scotland Effective use of forecasts for demand and weather important Wind generation can provide ancillary service when communications in place ANM to control a range of devices (Generators, Demand, Prosumers)

15 Questions? Orkney smart grid: Smarter Grid Solutions:


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