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Create 2-8-07 Revised 6/2/2010 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability Intermediate PowerPoint.

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Presentation on theme: "Create 2-8-07 Revised 6/2/2010 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability Intermediate PowerPoint."— Presentation transcript:

1 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability Intermediate PowerPoint

2 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 2 Create Revised 6/2/2010 While Waiting Launch PowerPoint Create a blank document with 2 slides Insert one graphic Name and save to the desktop

3 Nine Elements of Digital Citizenship Student Learning and Academic Performance 1. Digital Access: full electronic participation in society 2. Digital Literacy: the process of teaching and learning about technology and the use of technology 3. Digital Communication: electronic exchange of information School Environment and Student Behavior 4. Digital Security & Safety: electronic precautions to guarantee safety/physical well-being in a digital technology world 5. Digital Etiquette: electronic standards of conduct or procedure 6. Digital Rights and Responsibilities: those freedoms extended to everyone in a digital world Student Life Outside the School Environment 7. Digital Commerce: electronic buying and selling of goods 8. Digital Health and Wellness: physical and psychological well-being 9. Digital Law: rights and restrictions Create Revised 6/2/ Office of Information, Technology and Accountability

4 Digital Citizenship Links: spx spx Create Revised 6/2/ Office of Information, Technology and Accountability

5 5 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Standards Addressed Standard 1. Demonstrate proficiency in the use of computers and applications as well as an understanding of concepts underlying hardware, software, and connectivity. Standard 3. Demonstrate ability to use technology for research, problem-solving, and communication.

6 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 6 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Intermediate PowerPoint By the end of this session you will know and be able to:  Create a slide presentation using appropriate applications  Identify and use editing and formatting features  Insert images from other files

7 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 7 Create Revised 6/2/2010 You Will Demonstrate This By ~ Create a 10 slide presentation  Include an animation  One photograph  Two transitions

8 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 8 Create Revised 6/2/2010 What is PowerPoint? Why should I learn how to use it? PowerPoint is a high-powered software tool used for presenting information in a dynamic slide show format. Text, charts, graphs, sound effects and video are just some of the elements. Whether it's a classroom lesson, a parents' group meeting, a teachers' seminar or an unattended kiosk at the Science Fair - PowerPoint shows you how to make a powerful impression on your audience.

9 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 9 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Creating a presentation After opening PowerPoint you will see a screen such as this one You can choose to open a previous presentation, to create a new one or use a template.

10 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 10 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Slide Masters Select View|Master|Slide Master from the menu bar. Format the master slide just as you would format a regular slide by formatting text, formatting lists, adding background patterns and effects, and setting footers. Click the Close button on the Master toolbar to quit editing the master slide and return to the presentation.

11 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 11 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Slide Master The slide master stores the styles for the template—such as font styles, layout (where the text, headers, and footers are positioned), background design, and color scheme. It's a place where you can make global style changes to your slides. For example, if you want the font to be a different color throughout the show, change it on the slide master.

12 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 12 Create Revised 6/2/2010 The Title Master For the most part, the templates included in PowerPoint have both a title master and a slide master. The title master's layout and design differ slightly from the slide master's. This makes your title slides stand out from the other slides and also enables you to make changes that will affect all but your title slides or nothing but your title slides.

13 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 13 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Title Slide With Customizations The title master makes it possible for you to customize your title slides to your liking without affecting the rest of your slides. Customizing the title master is especially beneficial if you plan to use the title slide multiple times in your show. For instance, you could use title slides to introduce new sections in the show. All the customizations you've made to the title master show up on each title slide.

14 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 14 Create Revised 6/2/2010 So, exactly what do we mean by "title slide," anyway? A title slide is one that uses a Title Slide layout. The layout's name shows in the ScreenTip when you point to the layout thumbnail. When you open a new presentation in PowerPoint, the first slide in it is always the title slide. Whenever you want a title slide—and the styles from the title master—apply a Title Slide layout Title Slide

15 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 15 Create Revised 6/2/2010 To display the title master, on the View menu, point to Master, and click Slide Master. This opens Slide Master view. Click the second slide thumbnail in the left of the window to display the title master. The title master might look a little intimidating at first; it just takes some getting used to. Color scheme, background, font style and color, shapes, art, and some animations can be changed or added here to make title slides unique. For example, to change the font style for the title, you'd select the boilerplate text and change the style, but you wouldn't type text her Title Slide

16 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 16 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Choosing Graphics Be sure they enhance your presentation Too many may distract your audience

17 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 17 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Inserting Graphics

18 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 18 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Graphics The Drawing Toolbar provides many commands for creating and editing graphics. The toolbar is located at the bottom of the Power Point screen or it can be activated by selecting View|Toolbars|Drawing from the menu bar.

19 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 19 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Graphics Menu  Grouping - Images can be grouped together so they become one image and can be moved together or the same formatting changes can be applied to both at once. Select all the images that will be grouped by holding down the SHIFT key and clicking once on each image. Then select Group from the Draw menu. The images can be ungrouped by selecting Ungroup from the same menu.  Order - The order of overlapping images can be changed using this feature. In the example of two rectangles below, the green rectangle is selected and the Send Backward command was used to move the image below the blue rectangle. Send Backward and Bring Forward will move elements by one layer. Send to Back and Bring to Front move the elements to the back or top of a series of several overlapping graphics.

20 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 20 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Graphics  Nudge - Use the nudge actions to move an object slightly in one direction.  Align or Distribute - Select a group of objects and choose one of the commands from the Align or Distribute menu to change the position of the objects in relation to one another.  Rotate or Flip - Rotate an object 90 degrees or flip the object over its x- or y-axis.

21 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 21 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Graphics Select objects - Deactivate all drawing functions. Free rotate - This button will place green handles on certain objects so they can be arbitrarily rotated. Click and drag the handles to rotate the objects. AutoShapes menu - Click the small down arrow to the right of the "AutoShapes" text to select a shape. Line and Arrow - Click and drag the mouse on the slide to add lines. Hold down the SHIFT key to draw a straight line. Use the end points of the completed line to stretch and reposition the line. Rectangle and Oval - Click and drag the mouse on the slide to add rectangles and ovals. Hold down the SHIFT key to add squares and circles. Text box - Click to draw a text box on the slide. Word art - Click to add WordArt. Picture - Click to add a clip art image to the slide. Fill color - Choose a fill color for rectangles, ovals, and clip art. Line color - Select a border color for shapes and pictures. Font color - Highlight text on the slide and click the small down arrow next to the Font color icon to select a color. Line style - Highlight a line or arrow that has been drawn and click this button to select a thickness or style for the line. Dash style - Highlight a line or arrow and select a dash style. Arrow style - Change the arrow head style for an existing arrow or change a line to an arrow. Shadow - Select a text box to add shadow to text or choose any other object on the slide to add a drop shadow. 3D - Add a three-dimensional effect to text and other objects.

22 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 22 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Photos Select Insert|Picture|From File from the menu bar. Click the down arrow button on the right side of the Look in: window to find the image on your computer. Highlight the file name from the list and click the Insert button.

23 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 23 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Pictures We love to use them, but they tend to make file sizes huge.  You can avoid this—saving room on your hard disk and reducing download time—by using Compress Pictures, a feature on the Picture toolbar. It gives you options for reducing image resolution; applying compression with no loss to quality; and discarding unwanted information, such as the cropped parts of an image.

24 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 24 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Web/Screen optimizes the resolution to 96 dots per inch (dpi). Print optimizes the resolution to 200 dpi. Select No Change if you don't want the resolution touched at all and are choosing other options. The Compress pictures option reduces color format with no loss to picture quality. (This has the same name as the main feature button but has a specific purpose here.) When you click Compress Pictures on the Picture toolbar, you see the dialog box shown on the left. Pictures

25 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 25 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Reduce Resolution Note the area in the middle of the dialog box called Change resolution. Use this when you don't need every single pixel in the current image to get an acceptable version of it for your slide show or Web presentation or your printed output. This can be effective with images you've scaled to be smaller, as their "dots per inch" actually increase in that case. Changing the resolution can affect image quality. Before saving your file, look at your images in Slide Show mode after reducing the resolution. If you're not happy with the reduced resolution, select that picture in normal view, and use the Reset Picture button on the Picture toolbar to restore the original resolution.

26 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 26 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Reduce Color Format Depending on how many colors are used in the image, sometimes its color format can be reduced to make its file size smaller. The Compress pictures option (within the Compress Pictures dialog box) does this, making color take up fewer bits per pixel. There's no loss in quality.

27 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 27 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Borders Adding borders to pictures is a nice addition to pictures. It frames the pictures for more emphasis.

28 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 28 Create Revised 6/2/2010 To Add A Border Right click on the picture  Select format picture

29 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 29 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Borders Click on colors and lines tab Clicking here you can add the line and change the color

30 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 30 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Transitions Transition, is the way in which the slide is revealed using an effect like a wipe or a checkerboard pattern.

31 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 31 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Auto Transitions Transitions can be set to automatically move by checking box and setting the time The speed of transitions can be set A sound may also be set to play with the transitions.

32 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 32 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Custom Animation Entrance, such as text fading in or flying in. Emphasis or dimming — emphasis calls attention to a bullet point by making the text stand out; dimming de-emphasizes a bullet point once you've moved on. Exit — a fly out, fade out, bounce out, and the like. Motion path, which traces a pattern for an object to follow. Ellipse and Neutron are two schemes that use motion paths. A typical scheme for a bulleted list will have the text enter line by line and dim each line when a new line enters. Two such schemes in PowerPoint are called Fade in and dim and Appear and dim.

33 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 33 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Animation effects give motion to text, pictures, and other content on your slides. Besides adding action, they help you steer audience focus, emphasize important points, transition between slides, and maximize slide space by moving things on and off. Used well, animation effects bring flair, spice, and surprise. Custom Animation

34 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 34 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Animations

35 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 35 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Custom Animations A motion path moves items around on a slide in lines, curves, diagonals, squiggles, shapes such as stars and figure eights, or any unique design you're inspired to draw. Unlike with an entrance or exit effect, you can use a path simply to move something on the slide from one position to another. Stretch, shrink, rotate, and reposition the path to your heart's content.

36 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 36 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Custom Animation Draw a custom path Line : Drag to draw a straight path. Curve : Drag for a line and click at points where you want a curve. Double-click to end it. Freeform : Drag for freehand and release the mouse wherever you want a straight line. Click again for freehand. Double-click to end it. Scribble : Drag for a completely freehand shape.

37 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 37 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Custom Animation A preset path is a pre-drawn line, curve, or shape that you position and edit but do not originally draw. Advantages to using  The line or shape is created for you. You can then tweak it, enlarge it, shrink it, lengthen it, reshape it—but the initial line, curve, or whatever, is there, smooth; if you need a circle, you get a perfect one.

38 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 38 Create Revised 6/2/2010 To apply a motion path effect, you select the item (text box, picture, shape) on the slide, then add the effect from the menu on the Add Effect button in the Custom Animation task pane. The animation on the left illustrates the process for applying first a preset path and then a custom path. Notice that the different types of paths appear in different places on the Motion Paths submenu: Preset paths (default and recently used) are at the top of the submenu; for the full gallery, click More Motion Paths. Custom path types appear when you point to Draw Custom Path, near the bottom of the menu; click a type from that submenu (Line, Curve, Freeform, or Scribble) and draw it. Custom Animation

39 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 39 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Move, Size, Rotate a Path To position the path: Point to the path and look for the four-headed arrow, and then drag the path. To size the path: Point to the path, see the four- headed arrow, and then click. This selects the path. You'll see sizing handles. Point to a handle and look for the two-headed arrow ; drag to resize. To rotate the path: Once the path is selected, point to the top of the rotator handle and drag the circular arrow to rotate the path. (Straight- line paths don't have this handle. Also, sometimes you need to zoom the slide pane to a higher percentage to see the handle.)

40 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 40 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Looping Click Slide show Select “set up Show”

41 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 41 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Printing You can also select a printout type and other print options in the Print dialog box, opened by clicking Print on the File menu, or by clicking the Print button in print preview. Print one slide per page

42 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 42 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Preview a printout Open print preview by clicking the Print Preview button on the Standard toolbar (or, on the File menu, click Print Preview). Select printout types in the list for the Print What box. Printout Types

43 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 43 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Printing The Slides printout type. This prints the slide bigger than any other printout type. The Handouts (1 slide per page) type. This leaves larger margins than the slides type and lets you include page headers and footers. Print multiple slides per page Choose any of the handout types from two to nine slides per page. Print multiple slides per page with lines for audience notes Click the Handouts (3 slides per page) printout type. Print speaker notes Click the Notes Pages printout type. This prints one slide per page with your speaker notes underneath. Print an outline

44 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 44 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Printing In normal view, on the View menu, point to Master, and click one:  Notes Master  Handout Master (this also applies to outlines) Depending on which one you choose, the Notes Master View toolbar or Handout Master View toolbar appears. For handouts, click the printout type you want on the Handout Master View toolbar.

45 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 45 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Printing For notes pages, you can:  Change font and paragraph formatting for notes, headers, and footers.  Change the size and position of slides, notes, header, and footer areas.  Change the border color and style of slides, notes, and header and footer areas; change the fill color for notes, header, and footer areas.

46 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 46 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Printing For handouts and outlines, you can:  Change font and paragraph formatting for headers and footers.  Change the size and position of header and footer areas.  Change the border color, style, and fill color of header and footer areas.

47 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 47 Create Revised 6/2/2010 Your Turn Create a 10 slide presentation  Include an animation  One photograph  Two Transitions

48 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 48 Create Revised 6/2/2010

49 Office of Information, Technology and Accountability 49 Create Revised 6/2/2010 RUBRIC CATEGORY4321 EffectivenessProject includes all material needed to gain a comfortable understanding of the topic. It is a highly effective study guide. Project includes most material needed to gain a comfortable understanding of the material but is lacking one or two key elements. It is an adequate study guide. Project is missing more than two key elements. It would make an incomplete study guide. Project is lacking several key elements and has inaccuracies that make it a poor study guide. Sequencing of InformationInformation is organized in a clear, logical way. It is easy to anticipate the type of material that might be on the next card. Most information is organized in a clear, logical way. One card or item of information seems out of place. Some information is logically sequenced. An occasional card or item of information seems out of place. There is no clear plan for the organization of information. Text - Font Choice & FormattingFont formats (e.g., color, bold, italic) have been carefully planned to enhance readability and content. Font formats have been carefully planned to enhance readability. Font formatting has been carefully planned to complement the content. It may be a little hard to read. Font formatting makes it very difficult to read the material. Use of GraphicsAll graphics are attractive (size and colors) and support the theme/content of the presentation. A few graphics are not attractive but all support the theme/content of the presentation. All graphics are attractive but a few do not seem to support the theme/content of the presentation. Several graphics are unattractive AND detract from the content of the presentation. BackgroundBackground does not detract from text or other graphics. Choice of background is consistent from card to card and is appropriate for the topic. Background does not detract from text or other graphics. Choice of background is consistent from card to card. Background does not detract from text or other graphics. Background makes it difficult to see text or competes with other graphics on the page.

50 Resources: ISTE Publications, Digital Citizenship in Schools by Mike Ribble and Gerald Bailey, copyright 2007, ISBN No: oint/ppt.html oint/ppt.html Create Revised 6/2/ Office of Information, Technology and Accountability


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