Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume 07-21 TRAINING Click anywhere on page to view show in its entirety Click anywhere on page to view show.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume 07-21 TRAINING Click anywhere on page to view show in its entirety Click anywhere on page to view show."— Presentation transcript:

1 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume TRAINING Click anywhere on page to view show in its entirety Click anywhere on page to view show in its entirety FIRE MEDICS Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. 1 Quiz EVOLUTIONS 2000 Kramer vs. Kramer Program Quiz Answers FIRELINE Tire Warehouse Fire “Quick Calls” Discussion Questions HANDS-ON Large/Wide Area Search, Pt. 1 Quiz F-500 Fire Suppression Agent Quiz Working Fire Training 07-2 Training Materials

2 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume TRAINING Click anywhere on page to view show in its entirety Click anywhere on page to view show in its entirety Working Fire Training 07-2 Training Materials All training methods and procedures presented in this Working Fire Training (WFT) video program and training materials are based on IFSTA, NFPA, NIOSH, OSHA and all other relevant industry regulations and standards and are presented as a part of generally accepted and acknowledged practices in the U.S. Fire Service. WFT should be used under the supervision of certified trainers in conjunction with national, state, and local training standards and protocols, and the standard operating guides and procedures of the Subscriber. WFT is intended to be an ancillary source of training information and should not be used as the sole source of training for any emergency service organization. WFT accepts no responsibility for how the Subscriber implements or integrates this program into the Subscriber’s own training program, nor does the use of this program by the Subscriber imply that WFT approves or endorses any specific training methods presented by the Subscriber to its own organization. WFT accepts no responsibility for the correct understanding or application of its training methods and procedures by emergency service personnel who view this program; nor for any performance or lack of performance by emergency service personnel who may view this program and use or apply these training methods and procedures incorrectly; nor does it accept any liability for injuries or deaths of emergency service personnel who may view this program and use or apply such training methods and procedures incorrectly. By presenting this program for viewing to its organization’s members, the Subscriber, and by viewing or reading materials presented by WFT, the members and students of the Subscriber, agree to hold harmless WFT, the University of Cincinnati, VFIS, and any persons or organizations who participate in the creation and/or presentation of this training material from any legal action which might result from any line-of-duty injuries or deaths of the Subscriber’s members or any other emergency service personnel who view this program and who may use or apply such training methods and procedures incorrectly. LEGAL DISCLAIMER

3 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume DISPATCH/SIZE-UP A five-alarm fire broke out at a tire warehouse. A two-story, 150’ X 50’ steel structure with office Did a 360, found tires on A, C, and D sides. –Also, exposures on all four sides Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

4 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume DISPATCH/SIZE-UP Had preplanned structure –High-hazard situation; three other business surrounding it –No hydrants in the area –They knew they’d need: a tanker shuttling operation a large-diameter task force and foam resources. Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

5 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume EVENTS Exposures were an immediate problem. –1 ¾” line was pulled by a mutual aid department. –A Quint set up a master stream operation. Water supply was a problem with no hydrants. –Requested the Tanker Task Force (water tenders) from the county. –Requested foam resources. Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

6 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume STRATEGY/TACTICS From the outset this would be a defensive fire attack: –due to the type of structure –the amount of fire coming through the roof. –No interior entry of any kind was attempted. Water resource supply officers found sources: –a pond 750’ across the street from the scene –another pond 4,500’ to the south –a hydrant 4,600’ to the north. Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

7 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume STRATEGY/TACTICS Large-diameter (4”) task force fed from the hydrant area. Tanker shuttles and drafting operations pulled from the ponds. –Provided 25,000 gallons of water Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

8 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume ACCOUNTABILITY They knew there would be a roof collapse at some point. –When it occurred, an accountability report was taken immediately to make sure no personnel were affected. Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

9 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume INCIDENT COMMAND Appointed division officers –Fire Marshall & Fire Academy Director (took Deputy of Accountability position) –Senior officers and firefighters took command positions Designated Manpower Command division –Massive personnel management –Firefighters from two states and five counties –Fought fire for 18 hours –This decreased pressure on Incident Commander. Instituted multiple personnel accountability reports Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

10 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume COMMUNICATIONS Six separate radio channels were assigned to: –EMS –Operations –Water Supply –multiple divisions and mutual aid jurisdictions County field communications unit was dispatched approximate 2.5 hours into the incident –Command post was moved to that location –Assisted with radio traffic for another 5-6 hours Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

11 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume HAZ-MAT Two major concerns were: –air monitoring of air and runoff in the area –decontamination of personnel and gear Consulted with specialists who determined that normal cleaning methods would be suitable. REHAB –Conditions were freezing cold that night. –They tried to rehab as many personnel as possible. Could have done a better job if personnel were tracked –It was left to the company officers of each unit to determine rehab needs of their people. Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

12 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume LESSONS LEARNED Rehab was “shoddy.” They are reevaluating rehab procedures for large-response incidents. In retrospect, the command post should have been set up across the street from the fire, to remove it somewhat from the fireground. –Safety Issue: This wasn’t done as the street hadn’t been shut down initially and personnel would have been in jeopardy trying to cross the street. There were no injuries or lives lost in this $4 million fire. Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

13 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume REVIEW The building had been preplanned –Because responders knew tankers would be needed, they arrived quickly. Swift and accurate size-up An efficient command post was set up early Sufficient communication channels were allocated and maintained. Sufficient Haz-Mat monitoring resources were used. Commanders thought rehab was inadequate for a major incident. This is under review. Fireline Incident: Tire Warehouse Fire 07-2 Training Materials

14 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” “Quick Calls” is a back again this month. We’ll show you a video clip of some fire or emergency incident and give you some details about it. You discuss it within the department and then Chief Bill Kramer, WFT’s educational consultant, will give his thoughts on handling the incidents. You may or may not agree, but either way, it’s more exposure to an incident that your department could run into. So let’s get prepared! 07-2 Training Materials

15 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #1 – FIREFIGHTING VS. OVERHAUL SIZE-UP/EVENTS Firefighters are beginning overhaul on a fire which has been brought under control. –They are extinguishing hotspots. One firefighter jumps down from what looks like what’s left of the roof. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

16 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #1 – FIREFIGHTING VS. OVERHAUL SIZE-UP/EVENTS Abundant smoke was still present. Almost immediately, fire breaks out again in the exact spot the firefighter was standing. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

17 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #1 – FIREFIGHTING VS. OVERHAUL QUESTIONS/CONSIDERATIONS At this point, should we be overhauling this building? Or should we still be in firefighting mode? When does firefighting end and overhauling begin? Can overhaul start prematurely? Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

18 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #1 – FIREFIGHTING VS. OVERHAUL QUESTIONS/CONSIDERATIONS Who decides when overhaul begins? What’s the role of the Safety Officer in this decision? Is this decision covered by your department’s SOGs? Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

19 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #1 –FIREFIGHTING VS. OVERHAUL KRAMER’S APPROACH We have an interweaving of the firefighting and overhaul stage. –It’s not a black-and-white situation. Where one begins and the other ends is not all that distinct. But we can make sure that good PPE is worn properly whenever there is an approximate danger of fire. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

20 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #2 – DROPPED GROUND LADDER SIZE-UP/EVENTS Ground ladders are extended against the A side of the building, near the A-B corner. Meanwhile, an aerial is extended on the B side, also at the A-B corner, allowing a truck crew to reach the roof. The aerial crew is also using a ground ladder, to gain access to the roof which is lower than the roof wall. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

21 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #2 – DROPPED GROUND LADDER SIZE-UP/EVENTS As conditions deteriorate, Command orders the aerial crew off the roof. The roof crew starts vacating in a hurry -- perhaps in too much of a hurry. –They lose control of the ground ladder which falls, quickly followed by a pike pole, nearly striking another firefighter on the A side ground ladder. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

22 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #2 – DROPPED GROUND LADDER SIZE-UP/EVENTS Although the firefighter above controlling the ground ladder is looking down, he apparently doesn’t see the firefighter on the lower ground ladder on the A side. Disaster is narrowly averted! Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

23 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #2 – DROPPED GROUND LADDER QUESTIONS/CONSIDERATIONS Perhaps this was just a case of being in the wrong place at the wrong time. –On the other hand, could this incident have been avoided? Should there have been a Safety Officer with the crew on the roof? Is this something an Operations Officer or a Safety Officer on the ground could have or should have seen from that vantage point? Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

24 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #2 – DROPPED GROUND LADDER QUESTIONS/CONSIDERATIONS How would your department handle a situation where firefighters are working in close proximity to each other on different levels? Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

25 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #2 – DROPPED GROUND LADDER KRAMER’S APPROACH A close call but no one hurt. But this is a perfect example of why a Safety Officer is necessary. –Crews working in close proximity of one another where the actions of one could affect the other. It’s the Safety Officer’s job of maintaining that big picture and relationship between crews working closely together. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

26 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #3 – FLASHOVER/ BACKDRAFT SIZE-UP/EVENTS A paint factory is well-involved and responders are on scene. People are also in the hot zone who are not wearing PPE. They may or may not be firefighters. A backdraft or flashover occurs, blowing out the front of the structure. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

27 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #3 – FLASHOVER/ BACKDRAFT QUESTIONS/CONSIDERATIONS Always wear appropriate PPE on the fireground. Amazingly, it still happens: no freelancing! –It’s a good way of getting yourself or someone else killed. Be aware of the fire’s progression and your position on the fireground. Often, there are external signs of impending flashover. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

28 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #3 – FLASHOVER/ BACKDRAFT KRAMER’S APPROACH What you see has probably already happened in your department. It happens all the time. Backdraft, flashover, collapse can seriously endanger persons on the exterior of the building. When working on the fireground, or just outside it, always be aware of those safety perimeters. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

29 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #4 – CAR FIRE SIZE-UP/EVENTS The crew attacks the interior of the vehicle, seeming to ignore the fire underneath... even when their fire hose flips under and lands in the flames. It’s hard to tell what the year is of the truck on fire, but the crew is working dangerously close to the front of the bumper which could swing around. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

30 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #4 – CAR FIRE SIZE-UP/EVENTS Another member approaches with a fire extinguisher...wearing no fire helmet. The same person then tries to pry open the hood, without trying the latch first. Another apparent-department member approaches to help -- wearing no PPE whatsoever! They don’t seem to notice the fire under the gas tank. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

31 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #4 – CAR FIRE QUESTIONS/CONSIDERATIONS Approach a car fire with two hose crews, preferably with foam in the hoses. Approach from the front three-quarter angle to avoid swinging bumpers – never straight-on! Never park apparatus behind a burning vehicle. Gas tanks on older vehicles may explode rearward. Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

32 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #4 – CAR FIRE QUESTIONS/CONSIDERATIONS Review the Working Fire Training series on Vehicle Fires in volumes 05-5 and Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

33 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume QUICK CALL #4 – CAR FIRE KRAMER’S APPROACH Sort of like organized mayhem, but there were some positives. One responder was wearing PPE with air tank and face piece. –Some of the most serious carcinogens and toxic properties are produced by vehicle fires. –Other responders were not properly outfitted. Regarding extinguishment, what about using foam or F-500 featured later on in Hands-On? Fireline Incident: “Quick Calls” 07-2 Training Materials

34 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Fireline Incident Discussion The departments involved in this month’s training and WFT pose some discussion questions that you can use as discussion-starters in your own department’s training sessions. How will your department handle these scenarios? 07-2 Training Materials

35 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Tire Warehouse Fire / Pennsville, NJ Chief Larry Zimmerman, Pennsville (NJ) Fire & Rescue Bat. Chief Clifford Boxer, Pennsville (NJ) Fire & Rescue The Worcester, MA fire department knew their cold storage warehouse was going to be trouble if it ever ignited: it finally took six firefighters’ lives. Do you have a “monster” in your jurisdiction, just waiting to light up? Our suggestion is to become intimately familiar with the structure: how it’s built, where everything is inside, and what its contents are. If it’s vacant, get in there and make it “firefighter-friendly.” Next, do a complete “what-if” analysis and work up every possible scenario you can think of. Plan for every contingency. This should also include a complete resource plan – especially water sources and transportation if you don’t have hydrants. Fireline Incident Discussion 07-2 Training Materials

36 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume “Quick Calls” Chief & Professor Bill Kramer, Open Learning Fire Science Program, University of Cincinnati How does your department determine when firefighting changes to overhaul? Crews working in close proximity to each other must be aware of each other and whether what they are doing may affect the other. Safety officers should be all over a situation such as this. We’re still seeing lots of situations where responders are not properly outfitted in PPE. It doesn’t get any more basic than this: you MUST wear the proper gear EVERY time you respond. You disrespect yourself and the profession if you don’t. Some departments need to develop and follow their SOGs! Fireline Incident Discussion 07-2 Training Materials

37 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES After watching this segment, the student shall understand: procedures for executing a wide-area search in a warehouse, hotel, factory, or other large structure or space. Learn specific tips and techniques for executing such a search safely. CODES, STANDARDS & REGULATIONS NFPA 1670 Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

38 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume SEARCH DIFFERENCES The difference between searching a room in a residence and a wide area in a warehouse or factory is substantial. In a residence, you can tell what room you’re in from structures, like closets, or the furniture in it. And if you get lost, if you find a wall, you can usually find a window. In a warehouse or factory, you may have none of those reference or orientation points and probably no windows. You MUST find an orientation point around which to base your search! Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

39 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume AREA LAYOUT Assume an area is 75’ X 100” or 100” X 100’. Also assume our search rope (mainline) is 100’ long. –If we stretch it out completely, the end of the rope should be close to that back wall. –Time is another factor, based on the size of your crew. Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

40 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume AREA LAYOUT If you know your crew can’t search the entire area based on SCBA time, go halfway and search up to there, knowing another crew will come in and search the next area past you. Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

41 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume DEPTH PERCEPTION & DIRECTION So how do we know how far in we are? Knots & loops on the search mainline will tell us how far we are from the door. –At the 25’ mark, you’ll find a knot and a loop in the mainline. –At 50’, there will be a two knots and a loop. –At 75’, there will be three knots and a loop. –At 100’, the rope bag maxes out. The knots always lead the way out. –That’s why in the examples above, you encounter the knots first, before the loops, as you go in. Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

42 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume SEARCH EXERCISE The mainline is anchored to a fixed object. The anchorman goes in first with the rope bag and heads toward the back wall. –He pulls back on the line to keep it taut. Search crew members follow him in and attach their tag line periodically along the mainline using a carabiner. –Could be a rope or a piece of webbing. They stretch out from the mainline on each side, swinging an ax, a Halligan or a pole to cover the area. Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

43 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume SEARCH EXERCISE Upon finding the victim, the searcher makes his way back to the mainline, dragging the victim. Be aware that you may encounter obstacles. –Ascertain their size, shape, and whether you can get around them and on which side. –Be careful not to get your tagline tangled or caught on the obstacle. –You must come back to the mainline on the same side of the obstacle as you passed it or you’ll snag your tagline! Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

44 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume EXERCISE POST-BRIEFING What about extending taglines out to 25’ and beyond from the mainline to increase search coverage? It makes sense in theory, but safety becomes a factor. –If you venture too far from the mainline alone, especially if it’s a situation with many obstacles, you could get into real jeopardy if something goes wrong. –If you did it in pairs, it would make more sense, so if something happened to one of you quite a distance from the mainline, you’d have a buddy who could hear you and help. Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

45 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume EXERCISE POST-BRIEFING (cont.) The situation itself will determine what’s possible. –Available manpower will also determine what you can do. Hands-On: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

46 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ 1. True or False: Orientation is something you must acquire and maintain. 2. True or False: Don’t worry about encountering obstacles because they can be easily circled. 3. True or False: Don’t go deeper into the structure than you have the air to search Training Materials Quiz: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I

47 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 4. Which is NOT correct: a. At 25’ you’ll find a knot followed by a loop b. At 50’, you’ll find a knot followed by two loops. c. At 75’, you’ll find three knots followed by a loop. d. At 100’, you’ll find the rope bag (assuming a 100’ rope). e. One of the above 07-2 Training Materials Quiz: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I

48 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 5. Which is most always true? a. The anchorman must keep the mainline taut. b. Extending your tagline beyond 25’ could be a good idea. c. Extending two taglines in pairs beyond 25’ is a better idea. d. A searcher with a tagline extended to 100’ might or might not hear another searcher opposite from his position on the other side of the mainline. e. None of the above 07-2 Training Materials Quiz: Wide-Area Search, Pt. I (Answers on Slide 94)

49 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES After watching this segment, the student shall: become aware of a new fire suppression product understand its product features and applications. CODES, STANDARDS & REGULATIONS NFPA 1, 11, 12, 17, 17A, 2001, Others may be relevant. Review the fire tetrahedron and the chemistry and physics of fire combustion. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

50 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume EDITOR’S NOTE Neither Working Fire Training nor the fire department involved in this demonstration received any compensation for hosting this demo or for speaking about the product. Department personnel wanted to see the product in action for themselves before they purchased it. After seeing it perform, they thought it would be important for other departments to become aware of this product because of its many fire suppression and safety advantages. -ed. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

51 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THE PRODUCT This is a demonstration of the F-500 Micelle Encapsulator Fire Suppression Agent manufactured by Hazard Control Technologies, Inc. This is not a foam; the fire suppression mechanics and technology utilized by F-500 are vastly different than conventional foam. West County EMS & Fire in Manchester, MO and Training Officer Chuck Marsonette shot video of a demonstration of the product. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

52 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume HOW IT WORKS F-500 forms and maintains micelles or "chemical cocoons" around the fuel (hydrocarbons in the case of tires, gasoline, or diesel fuel), neutralizing the fuel leg of the fire tetrahedron rather than forming a blanket depriving the fire of oxygen, as do other foam products. –For fire suppression, F-500 is UL listed for Class A and Class B fires at 1%, 3% and 6%. –Typically, 1% is used for Class A fires, with 3% and 6% used for Class B fires. For Class D fires a more concentrated solution is required. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

53 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume VEHICLE FIRE DEMONSTRATION The temperature of such a fire just prior to extinguishment is around 1300° °. –As you see in the video, the glass is melted out of the vehicle and the airbag did ignite. The crews prepared a mixture of 1% which makes a white-water mixture. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

54 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume VEHICLE FIRE DEMONSTRATION As the crews make a quick sweep of the interior of the car, the mixture knocks down 90% of the fire. –Notice the color of the smoke; the white smoke is not steam, but a bi-product of the F-500 chemical reaction. –The amount of water used is much less. –The knock-down reduces the amount of heat which often pushes crews back as they attempt to fight such a fire. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

55 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume VEHICLE FIRE DEMONSTRATION –Temperatures decreased from around 1400° to about 100° in less than a minute or two. The F- 500 has an exceptional ability to cool surfaces. Marsonette was able to walk up to the car and touch the metal in under a minute. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

56 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume VEHICLE FIRE DEMONSTRATION Application –This is an all-in-one solution for class A and B fires but also works in special situations. It has great versatility. –Considering E85 and ED85 flex-fuel cars, with the alcohol component, E95, F-500 is not alcohol-resistant and is able to “lock up” or neutralize the hydrocarbon in the fuel components in gasohol or ethanol fuel. –This allows a greater degree of safety, in cases where A-FFF or a protein-based foam would normally be used. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

57 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume SIMULATED ROADWAY SPILL West County simulated a roadway fuel spill and then mitigated it with F-500. –This involved taking a large washtub, adding 3 gallons of gasoline, 8 ounces of F-500 agent, and approximately 5 gallons of water. Several things were learned: –Gasoline and diesel fuel, spilled on asphalt, concrete, or other permanent surfaces, becomes very slick. –F-500 removes the slickness. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

58 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume SIMULATED ROADWAY SPILL Initially, West County tried to ignite this material using the same torch that was used to ignite other fires but were unable to do that. As a third test, the department brought out a four- gas detector (O 2, CO, H 2 S, and combustibles). The meter read zero for combustible organic compounds after burning and treatment with the F-500 agent. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

59 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume SIMULATED ROADWAY SPILL A 20-gallon fuel spill could be neutralized with a 6% mixture of F-500 and approximately 80 gallons of water. That fuel would then be non-combustible, reducing the danger of incident escalation and danger to firefighters. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

60 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume CHEMICAL REACTION As indicated in the video, as you look into the washtub, what you see is the chemical reaction taking place, removing the fuel leg of the fire tetrahedron and cutting the fuel off from ignition. The spiral movement in the bucket indicates a micelle encapsulation of the F-500 product locking up the hydrocarbons and free radicals, turning the gasoline into a non-combustible substance. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

61 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume TIRE FIRE DEMONSTRATION In the video demo, the small pile of tires that were set on fire were extinguished by using less than 100 gallons of water and the F-500 agent. One of the features of the F-500 mixture is that it uses less water (about 25% less than usual), hence there is less runoff after a fire. –This is important, for example, in tire fires, where haz- mat run-off into nearby water sources and sewer systems will be greatly minimized. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

62 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume TIRE FIRE DEMONSTRATION In addition, the steam, vapors and airborne products resulting from quicker extinguishment were greatly reduced, resulting in safer breathing for firefighters and the environment. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

63 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume TIRE FIRE DEMONSTRATION That's a big safety issue when you are reducing the amount of contaminant exposure to your personnel. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

64 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume PALLET FIRE DEMONSTRATION A medium-sized pile of pallets were also set on fire and ignited with a few short hose bursts – extinguished with about 50 gallons of water. DIFFICULT RE-IGNITION Fires put out with F-500 are extremely difficult to re-ignite. –In attempting to do a re-light comparison with a debris pile NOT extinguished with F-500, West County really had to work hard to get the material to re-ignite. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

65 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume COST/BENEFIT West County EMS and Fire is planning on using F-500 on every fire. What about the expense? They look at it this way: –Less time spent fighting a fire and being in a hot environment makes it safer for firefighters. –Using less water means less water damage, resulting in less salvage and overhaul, and putting personnel and apparatus back in service faster to be available for other calls. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

66 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume COST/BENEFIT They look at it this way: –This should eventually impact actuarial calculations and ISO ratings favorably. –Eventually, fire department casualty insurance rates should decrease as fewer casualties happen to firefighters during fires. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

67 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume BENEFITS TO CITIZENS There are real benefits to citizens: –A lot less water will be used, inflicting less water damage on personal property. –Quicker extinguishment means less smoke damage to structures and less overhaul. –Over time, West County district homeowners could make a case for lower homeowner insurance rates as the fire department ISO rating improves and the department can demonstrate lower casualty losses on residential fires. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

68 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume OTHER BENEFITS You can wash your hands with F-500 and remove the odor of gasoline. You can even use it as a decontamination liquid if crew members get hydrocarbon fuel-based products on their gear. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

69 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume WEST COUNTY EMS & FIRE – PREVIOUS S.O.G. The department has Class A firefighting foam installed on its apparatus but probably doesn’t use it as often as maybe it could or should in the extinguishment of fires and overhaul. On Class B or liquid hydrocarbon fuel fires, it has used the aqueous film-forming fluoroprotein foam (AFFF). –Marsonette feels it's a great product and has worked well for the fire service. but has its limitations. Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

70 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume WEST COUNTY EMS & FIRE – REVISED S.O.G. For the safety of its firefighters, West County EMS and fire District has decided to flow F-500 foam on all fires that it encounters, whether it's Class A, Class B, or even Class C fires, for extinguishment. –Warning: F-500 is not recommended for application on energized Class C fires! –But even with Class C fires, once they are de-energized, you still have the Class A components present and burning. –West County is going to default the foam computers on their trucks to 3% and overhaul practices at 1%. (The manufacturer recommends up to a 6% mixture, depending upon the application.) Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

71 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume REVIEW Quicker extinguishment means: –less water (about 25% less) –less runoff –less airborne pollutants due to less smoke –safer working and breathing environment for firefighters –eventual lower ISO ratings and casualty insurance rates. Benefits to citizens includes: –less smoke and water damage –eventual lower homeowner insurance rates Hands-On: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent 07-2 Training Materials

72 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ 1. True or False: This product is the newest advancement in foam products 2. True or False: The manufacturer recommends up to a 6% mixture, depending upon the fire. 3. True or False: Don’t use F-500 on energized Class C fires Training Materials Quiz: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent

73 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 4. F-500 affects which leg of the Fire Tetrahedron? a. Oxygen b. Heat c. Fuel d. Chemical reaction e. Two of the above 07-2 Training Materials Quiz: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent

74 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 5. Which of the following is NOT a benefit of F-500? a. Less smoke b. Less filling c. Less water d. More safety e. None of the above 07-2 Training Materials Quiz: F-500 Fire Suppression Agent (Answers on Slide 94)

75 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume OBJECTIVES/OUTCOMES After watching this segment, the student shall: understand the three stages of labor in childbirth learn specific signs to watch for by which to gauge the progress of the labor. CODES, STANDARDS & REGULATIONS Check local department protocols for Ob-Gyn procedures and guidelines. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

76 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THREE STAGES OF LABOR Dilation of the cervix Expulsion of the baby Delivery of the placenta First Stage: Dilation –Begins with the onset of contractions –Ends when the cervix is fully dilated –The cervix has to be stretched thin by uterine contractions for the opening to be large enough to let the baby pass through. –Contractions can last up to 16 hours for a first delivery. –The mother can usually be transported during this stage. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

77 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THREE STAGES OF LABOR First Stage: Signs & Symptoms –Onset of labor starts with contractions –*Bloody Show –*Rupture of the amniotic sack (breaking of water) * These events may occur before the first labor pain or later in the first stage of labor. –Warning: The mother may think she just has a backache! First Stage: Frequency & Intensity –Labor frequency and intensity increases over time. Uterine contractions become more regular and start to last seconds each. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

78 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THREE STAGES OF LABOR First Stage: Frequency & Intensity (cont.) –Length of labor varies greatly. In general, it’s longer in a primigravida patient (first-time birth). It’s shorter in a multigravida patient (previous pregnancies). Second Stage: From Dilation to Birth –Begins when the cervix is fully dilated –Ends when the infant is born –You will have to make a decision about helping the mother deliver on scene or providing transportation to the hospital! That’s your decision to make as a pre-hospital paraprofessional. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

79 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THREE STAGES OF LABOR Second Stage: From Dilation to Birth (cont.) –At this stage, because the infant has to move through the birth canal, contractions are usually closer together and last longer. –Pressure on the rectum may make the mother feel like she has to have a bowel movement. Under no circumstances should you let the mother sit on the toilet! Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

80 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THREE STAGES OF LABOR Second Stage: From Dilation to Birth (cont.) Babies have been known to be delivered in such cases and fall into the toilet! Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

81 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THREE STAGES OF LABOR Second Stage: From Dilation to Birth (cont.) –The mother will have a tremendous urge to bear down. –The perineum will also begin to bulge significantly. –The infant’s head will begin to appear at the vaginal opening (crowning). Third Stage: From Birth to after Placenta Delivery –The placenta may take up to a half-hour to be delivered. It may not happen while you are still on-scene. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

82 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume THREE STAGES OF LABOR Third Stage: From Birth to after Placenta Delivery (cont.) –Usually you won’t transport the mother during this period. Always practice body substance isolation to protect, the mother, baby, and you. There is a high potential of exposure to body fluids that are released during childbirth, so take precautions. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

83 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume PRE-BIRTH DELIVERY EVALUATION Many questions need to be asked. –Your approach should be the same as it would with any non- obstetric patient -- with special attention to the fetus. Complete the initial assessment quickly and then obtain the essential obstetric information. –Start with a history as with a typical patient. General medical history and patient’s state of health. Information about the pregnancy (mother’s gravidity, parity, length of gestation, estimated date of confinement (EDC), any miscarriages, abortions, C-sections or any obstetric or gynecological complications in the past) Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

84 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume PRE-BIRTH DELIVERY EVALUATION Complete the initial assessment quickly and then obtain the essential obstetric information (cont.). Has she had prenatal care? (Sometimes they haven’t) Has she had a sonogram? (These can reveal the age of the fetus, how many fetuses, abnormal presentations, and some birth defects.) Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

85 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume PRE-BIRTH DELIVERY EVALUATION Pre-delivery Evaluation Question List 1. Name, age, due date? 2. First delivery? 3. Contractions or pain? If so, when did they start? 4. Frequency/duration of contractions? 5. Bleeding or discharge? 6. Crowning? (If so, delivery is imminent.) Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

86 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume PRE-BIRTH DELIVERY EVALUATION Frequency/duration of contractions –Ask how long she has had labor pains. –When did they start? –Was the onset sudden or slow? –Try to define the character of the pain: its duration its location If it radiates, and if so, to where? (Usually labor pain radiates into the back.) Is the pain occurring on a regular basis? Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

87 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume PRE-BIRTH DELIVERY EVALUATION Important: Does she feel the urge to move her bowels? –If so, it usually means the baby has moved into the birth canal. –Remember, don’t let her use the toilet. Presence of vaginal bleeding or spotting –A major concern with an OB patient. –Ask about events immediate prior to the start of bleeding. –Gather information about the color, amount, and duration of the bleeding. –Count the number of sanitary pads she’s using; if she passes clots or tissue, save it for hospital personnel as they will want to run tests on the material. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

88 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume PRE-BIRTH DELIVERY EVALUATION Other questions to ask –Question the patient about any other vaginal discharge (color, amount, and duration) which could indicate an infection. –Ask whether the woman feels the urge to push. –Ask her whether she thinks her membranes have ruptured (breaking of water). Sometimes that feels like a dribble or a real gush of water. If that’s the case, delivery is imminent. Fire Medics: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I 07-2 Training Materials

89 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 1. True or False: Under no circumstances should the mother sit on the toilet after delivery. 2. True or False: You have to decide whether to deliver or transport. 3. True or False: The presence of bleeding is perfectly normal; don’t be concerned Training Materials Quiz: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I

90 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 4. Which would NOT be part of a Ob-Gyn patient history? a. Parity b. Number of pregnancies c. Gravidity d. Number of bowel movements. e. None of the above 07-2 Training Materials Quiz: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I

91 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Date___________ Firefighter/PM____________________ Chief/T.O.___________________ Education Credits _____ Select the best answer: 5. Which is correct? a. First Stage of Labor: Ends when the cervix is fully dilated b. Second Stage of Labor: From Birth to after Placenta Delivery c. Third Stage of Labor: From Dilation to Birth d. Two of the above e. None of the above 07-2 Training Materials Quiz: Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. I (Answers on Slide 91)

92 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Explain the advantages and disadvantages of concentrating fire scene safety in the hands of one “safety officer.” 2. Explain the advantages and disadvantages of making fire scene safety the responsibility of many individuals. 3. Explain how fire scene safety is handled in your own organization and provide any recommendations for improvement. If you’re enrolled in the Open Learning Fire Science Program at the University of Cincinnati, complete written responses to the following three essay questions to earn one college credit hour for watching Working Fire Training. Kramer vs. Kramer Fire Scene Safety 07-2 Training Materials Evolutions 2000 – Continuing Education

93 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume ENROLLMENT INFORMATION: For more information on enrolling in the Open Learning program to gain college credit, call Working Fire Training at for a brochure or, to register directly, call the University of Cincinnati at Associates and Bachelors programs are available. Call to have your transcripts evaluated. Send your responses to: Professor Bill Kramer University of Cincinnati College of Applied Science 2220 Victory Parkway, ML #103 Cincinnati, Ohio Training Materials Evolutions 2000 – Continuing Education

94 Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume Thanks so much for viewing Working Fire Training! See you next month – stay safe! Answers: Hands-On – Wide-Area Search, Pt. 1: Quiz on Slides 46-48: 1. True 2. False 3. True 4. b 5. a F-500 Fire Suppression Agent: Quiz on Slides 72-74: 1. False 2. True 3. True 4. c 5. b Fire Medics – Ob-Gyn Basics, Pt. 1: Quiz on Slides 89-91: 1. False 2. True 3. False 4. d 5. a TRAINING Working Fire Training 07-2 Training Materials


Download ppt "Emergency Services, LLC / Copyright 2007 / Volume 07-21 TRAINING Click anywhere on page to view show in its entirety Click anywhere on page to view show."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google