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Heat Exhaustion & Heatstroke The Center for Life Enrichment Quality Assurance 2013.

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Presentation on theme: "Heat Exhaustion & Heatstroke The Center for Life Enrichment Quality Assurance 2013."— Presentation transcript:

1 Heat Exhaustion & Heatstroke The Center for Life Enrichment Quality Assurance 2013

2 Heat Exhaustion Section 1

3  Heat exhaustion is a heat-related illness that can occur after you’ve been exposed to high temperatures for a period of time and have become dehydrated  Heat exhaustion is one of three heat-related syndromes, with heat cramps being the mildest and heatstroke being the most severe Heat Exhaustion

4  Causes of heat exhaustion include exposure to high temperatures, particularly when combined with high humidity and strenuous physical activity  Without prompt treatment, heat exhaustion can lead to heatstroke, a life-threatening condition  Heat exhaustion and heatstroke are preventable! Causes of Heat-Related Illnesses

5  Heat exhaustion is strongly related to the heat index  The risk of heat-related illness dramatically increases when the heat index climbs to 91 F or higher  It’s extremely important, especially during heat waves, to pay attention to the reported heat index  Remember that the heat index is even higher when you are standing in full sun  If you live in an urban area, you may be especially prone to develop heat exhaustion during a prolonged heat wave; asphalt and concrete store heat during the day and only gradually release it at night, resulting in higher nighttime temperatures Risk Factors for Heat Exhaustion

6 Heat Index  The heat index is given in degrees Fahrenheit  The heat index is a measure of how hot it really feels when relative humidity is factored in with the actual air temperature  When the humidity is high, your sweat can’t evaporate as easily, and your body has more difficulty cooling itself, making you prone to heat exhaustion and heatstroke  When the heat index is 91 F or higher, you should take precautions to keep cool

7  Age: Infants and children up to age 4, and adults over age 65, are particularly vulnerable because they adjust to heat more slowly than other people  Certain Health Conditions: Including heart, lung, or kidney disease, obesity or underweight, high blood pressure, diabetes, mental illness, sickle cell trait, alcoholism, sunburn, and any conditions that cause fever  Medications: Including diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers, stimulants, some heart and blood pressure medications, and medications for psychiatric conditions  Check with your doctor to see if your health conditions and medications are likely to affect your ability to cope with extreme heat and humidity Other Risk Factors

8  The most common signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion include:  Confusion  Dark-colored urine (a sign of dehydration)  Dizziness  Fainting  Fatigue  Headache  Muscle cramps  Nausea  Pale Skin  Cool, moist skin with goose bumps when in the heat  Excessive sweating  Weak or rapid heartbeat  Low blood pressure upon standing  Signs and symptoms of heat exhaustion may develop suddenly, or over time, especially with prolonged periods of exercise/physical activity Symptoms of Heat Exhaustion

9  If you think a person may be experiencing heat exhaustion:  Immediately get out of the heat and rest, preferably in an air- conditioned room  If you cannot get inside, try to find the nearest cool and shady place  Drink plenty of fluids (avoid caffeine and alcohol)  Remove any tight or unnecessary clothing  Take a cool shower, bath, or sponge bath  Apply other cooling measures such as fans or ice towels  If such measures fail to provide relief within 30 minutes, contact your doctor Treatment of Heat Exhaustion

10  After you’ve recovered from heat exhaustion, you may be more sensitive to high temperatures during the following week  It’s best to avoid hot weather and heavy exercise until your doctor tells you that it’s safe to resume your normal activities Take Precautions

11 Heatstroke Section 2

12  Heatstroke is caused by prolonged exposure to high temperatures or by doing physical activity in hot weather  You are considered to have heatstroke when your body temperature reaches 104 F or higher  Heatstroke is the most serious form of heat injury and is a medical emergency  A possible complication of heatstroke is shock, which is a condition caused by a sudden loss of blood flow  Signs of shock include a very low blood pressure, blue lips and nails, and cool, clammy skin  Heatstroke can kill or cause damage to the brain and other internal organs Heatstroke

13  Exposure to a hot environment  Strenuous activity  Wearing excessive clothing  Drinking alcohol  Becoming dehydrated Causes of Heatstroke

14  Anyone can develop heatstroke, but several factors place you at increased risk:  Age: Infants and children up to age 4, and adults over age 65, are particularly vulnerable because they adjust to heat more slowly than other people  Health Conditions: Including heart, lung, or kidney disease, obesity or underweight, high blood pressure, diabetes, mental illness, sickle cell trait, alcoholism, sunburn, and any conditions that cause fever  Medications: Including antihistamines, diet pills, diuretics, sedatives, tranquilizers, stimulants, seizure medications, heart and blood pressure medications, and medications for psychiatric illnesses Risk Factors

15  A body temperature of 104 F or higher is the main sign of heatstroke  Fainting  Throbbing headache  Dizziness and light-headedness  Lack of sweating despite the heat  Red, hot, and dry skin  Muscle weakness or cramps  Nausea and vomiting  Rapid heartbeat, which may be either strong or weak  Rapid, shallow breathing  Behavioral changes such as confusion, disorientation, or staggering  Seizures  Unconsciousness Symptoms of Heatstroke

16  If you think a person may be experiencing heatstroke, seek immediate medical help  Call 911  Take immediate action to cool the overheated person while waiting for emergency treatment  Help the person move to a shaded location and remove excess clothing  Place ice packs or cold, wet towels on the person’s head, neck, armpits, and groin  Mist the person with water while a fan is blowing on him or her Treatment of Heatstroke

17 Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses Section 3

18  When the heat index is high, it’s best to stay inside in air conditioning  If you must go outdoors, you can prevent heat exhaustion by taking these steps:  Wear lightweight, light-colored, loose-fitting clothing, and a wide-brimmed hat  Avoid sunburn; use a sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher. Having a sunburn reduces your body’s ability to rid itself of heat Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses

19  To prevent dehydration, it’s generally recommended to drink at least 8 glasses of water per day. Because heat-related illness also can result from salt depletion, it may be advisable to substitute an electrolyte-rich sports drink for water during periods of extreme heat and humidity  Take additional precautions when working outdoors or doing physical activity/exercise. The general recommendation is to drink 24 ounces of fluid two hours before exercise, and consider adding another 8 ounces of water or sports drink right before exercise  During exercise, you should consume another 8 ounces of water every 20 minutes even if you don’t feel thirsty  Avoid fluids containing either caffeine or alcohol, because both substances can make you lose more fluids and worsen heat exhaustion  If you have epilepsy or heart, kidney, or liver disease; are on fluid-restricted diets; or have a problem with fluid retention, check with your doctor before increasing liquid intake Preventing Heat-Related Illnesses: Drink Extra Fluids

20  On a hot day, the temperature in your parked car can rise 20 F in just 10 minutes!  Let your car cool down before you drive it  Never leave anyone in a parked car in hot weather for any period of time  In slide show mode, click the link below or copy & paste the link in your web browser to view the video:  “So how hot is it in your car?” The Dangers of Heat in a Parked Car

21     Resources


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