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Advocating for Health Catherine Thomasson, MD. History of Health Advocacy Medicine is a social science, and politics nothing but medicine on a grand scale.

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Presentation on theme: "Advocating for Health Catherine Thomasson, MD. History of Health Advocacy Medicine is a social science, and politics nothing but medicine on a grand scale."— Presentation transcript:

1 Advocating for Health Catherine Thomasson, MD

2 History of Health Advocacy Medicine is a social science, and politics nothing but medicine on a grand scale. Physicians are the natural attorneys of the poor, and social problems fall to a large extent within their jurisdiction. - R. Virchow, Die Medicinische Reform, 1848

3 Epidemic Typhus Epidemics with famine Poor living conditions

4 Impacts to Health Medical Care 10% Environment Clean air Clean water Behavior/Genetics exercise, drugs Social Determinants Adequate Food Socioeconomic status Freedom from war Safe housing

5 What is advocacy? Drawing a community’s attention to an important issue, and directing decision makers toward a solution

6 Health Professionals as Natural Advocates Objective and trusted Compassion with a desire to improve health Lawmakers and the public need “translators” of complicated, scientific issues

7 Motivation Intellectual stimulation Respect in the community Care for the poor-justice value Better health care for all

8 How do you “MAKE” someone care about Climate change?

9 Motivating Others: Understanding Self-Interest Latin: inter-esse to be among Self-interest is self among others Individual Needs: food, housing, wages, education, Social needs: friends, feeling useful, need for respect, pride US is a scientific leader and should lead on climate Class interest/Social Justice: is self-interest generalized— low income impacts of electricity costs or downwind pollution from coal plants Generational-concern for children or grandchildren Religious beliefs: Environmental stewardship of the earth and all people.

10 Organizing is the process of finding out what people want as individuals and then helping them find collective ways to get it.

11 Other ways to be an Advocate as a Student Join PSR/AMSA Take action online Use social media - blog posts - Twitter - Facebook - YouTube  Re-share a PSR Facebook topic

12 Questions about why we organize?

13 Public health impacted by Climate Change

14 The Forms of Community Organizing Accepts Existing Power relationships Challenges Existing Power Relationship Direct service Self-helpEducation Advocacy Create cooling stations to prevent death during heat waves.

15 The Forms of Community Organizing Accepts Existing Power relationships Challenges Existing Power Relationship Direct service Self- help Education Advocacy Solar cooperative; or series of cisterns

16 The Forms of Community Organizing Accepts Existing Power relationships Challenges Existing Power Relationship Direct service Education Self-help Advocacy

17 The Forms of Community Organizing Accepts Existing Power relationships Challenges Existing Power Relationship Direct service Advocacy Self-help Education

18 What is advocacy? Drawing a community’s attention to an important issue, and directing decision makers toward a solution

19 Install on-site renewable energy Purchase energy efficient products Reduce “standby” energy use Buy green power

20 Holy Redeemer Medical Center Philadelphia has implemented composting programs, including one for fryer grease. Composted food waste from the hospital is used as fertilizer at two local farms. Those farms then supply the hospital kitchen with fresh, local produce. [GGHC Food Services (FS) FS Credit 6 – Food Donation and Waste Reduction]

21 Questions about

22 Strategy Chart GoalsAssetsConstituentsTargetsTactics Long-term$$ImpactedProvider of solution Actions pressuring target Short-termPeopleOpponentsSecondary target

23 Goals to address Climate Change Result in real improvement in people’s lives Winnable Be worthwhile Understandable Builds for future wins

24 What goal or issue would you choose to provide a solution to address climate change?

25 What are your Assets? How many people in your group? What is your budget? How much time do you have? Do you have a large group to recruit form? You may wish to become part of a larger group.

26 Constituents: Allies & Opponents Constituent: Who also cares about this issue? Dean PSR AMSA Opponents Dean Competing organizations?

27 Who is your Target? Decision-maker Elected official Dean? Always a person/not an institution. If you can’t reach the decision- maker who can influence them?

28 What are your Tactics? Meeting/Negotiations Public hearings Writing for change: LTE/Op-Ed Media Events Educational forum

29 Other ways to be an Advocate as a Student Join PSR/AMSA Take action online Use social media - blog posts - Twitter - Facebook - YouTube  Re-share a PSR Facebook topic

30 More advocacy tactics Meetings - with lawmakers in their offices as a constituent - presentations to community groups, trade groups - Grand Rounds - with agency staff (EPA, Housing Authority) - boards of directors of companies, institutions Calls to legislators Joining the Green Team at your healthcare facility Radio and television interviews

31 "Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed people can change the world; indeed it’s the only thing that ever has!” MARGARET MEADE


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