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WHMIS WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM.

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Presentation on theme: "WHMIS WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM."— Presentation transcript:

1 WHMIS WORKPLACE HAZARDOUS MATERIALS INFORMATION SYSTEM

2 What is WHMIS?  WHMIS is a national system used to manage the hazardous materials in the workplace.  Throughout this presentation you will learn about: Health Hazards WHMIS Symbols Consumer Product Symbols Workplace Controls Personal Protective Equipment Implementation of the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS)

3 Responsibilities SUPPLIEREMPLOYEREMPLOYEE Obtain the most current information about their product Create and use container labels Create and supply Material Safety Data Sheets Update the information about their product every 3 years or within 90 days of any changes to their product Develop and implement a WHMIS system for all employees Use proper workplace labels for any product not in its original packaging Maintain a current list of all hazardous materials in the workplace Maintain a database of MSDS’s for all hazardous materials Update the MSDS database every 3 years Provide annual training and education for all employees Participate in the annual training provided by their employer Play an active role in protecting themselves and their coworkers against hazards in the workplace Play an active role in identifying and eliminating risks

4 HEALTH HAZARDS

5 Chemical and physical health hazards  Chemical and physical hazards are materials that in the event of exposure may result in serious health problems, such as: Burns to your skin or eyes (upon contact) Allergic reactions Kidney or lung damage Biological diseases Sterility Cancer

6 WHMIS Hazard Symbols  There are 6 categories and 8 WHMIS hazard symbols used for industrial products: Compressed Gas Flammable and Combustible Material Oxidizing Material Poisons and Toxic Materials ‐ Immediately Poisonous Material ‐ Material Causing Other Toxic Effects ‐ Bio-hazardous Infectious Material Corrosive Material Dangerously Reactive Material

7 Class A: Compressed Gas  Materials under Class A are held under pressure and can explode if heated or subjected to physical shock.  Handling Tips: The container must be secured and held up-right when stored or moved. The cap must be kept on when not in use. If the container has a regulator, the regulator must be disconnected before it is moved. To avoid impact forces the container should never be dropped, dragged, rolled or punctured. Always keep containers away from heat and sparks. Never use grease/oil on any valve on the container. Examples Oxygen Fire Extinguisher

8 Class B: Flammable and Combustible Material  Materials under Class B can burn and/or burst into flames very easily and suddenly when exposed to spark or open flame.  Handling Tips: Always keep containers away from heat and flames. Always keep containers sealed tightly to avoid accidental release into the environment. Always clean up spills immediately and dispose of clean up materials in a metal container. Never store near oxidizing or reactive materials. Examples Isopropyl Alcohol Formaldehyde

9 Class C: Oxidizing Material  Materials under Class C increase the risk of a fire and/or explosion in the presence of flammable or combustible materials.  Handling Tips: Always keep containers away from heat and flames. Always keep containers sealed tightly to avoid accidental release into the environment. Always store containers away from flammable/combustible and reactive materials. Examples Bleach Hydrogen Peroxide Oxygen

10 Class D 1 A/B: Immediately Poisonous Material  Materials under Class D 1 have the potential to cause immediate and permanent damage.  These materials may cause death when exposed to small amounts.  Handling Tips: Always use in a well ventilated area. Always follow proper hygiene protocols after working with these materials; especially before eating, drinking or smoking. Always wear proper protective equipment. Never wear your work clothes home. Examples Formaldehyde Virkon Anti-freeze

11 Class D 2 A/B: Material Causing Other Toxic Effects  Materials under Class D 2 can cause serious long-term illnesses following repeated exposure to small amounts.  These materials have the potential to be life-threatening.  Handling Tips: Always use in a well ventilated area. Always follow proper hygiene protocols after working with these materials; especially before eating, drinking or smoking. Always wear proper protective equipment. Never wear your work clothes home. Examples Bleach Isopropyl Alcohol Formaldehyde

12 Class D 3 : Bio-Hazardous Infectious Material  Materials under Class D 3 have the potential to cause serious biological disease resulting in illness or death.  Handling Tips: Always use in a well ventilated area. Always follow proper isolation protocols when in contact with diseased patients. Always follow proper hygiene protocols after working with these materials; especially before eating, drinking or smoking. Always wear proper protective equipment. Never wear your work clothes home. Examples Rabies Leptospirosis Toxoplasmosis

13 Class E: Corrosive Material  Materials under Class E have the potential to cause severe irritation and/or tissue damage under the following circumstances: upon contact with the skin or eyes, when inhaled, when ingested.  Some of the materials under Class E also have the ability to eat through metal.  Handling Tips: If exposed, immediately flush out the skin or eyes for at least 15 minutes and seek professional medical care if symptoms do not resolve quickly. Always use in a well ventilated area. Always follow proper hygiene protocols after working with these materials; especially before eating, drinking or smoking. Always wear proper protective equipment – a cartridge or supplied air respirator may be required. Never wear your work clothes home. Examples Bleach Peroxigard Hydrogen Peroxide

14 Class F: Dangerously Reactive Material  Materials under Class F are very unstable and have the potential to self-react dangerously upon standing or if there is a change in temperature, pressure, physical shock or exposure to air/water.  Handling Tips: Always keep these materials away from any source of heat. Always dispose of old chemicals as soon as possible. Always handle with care, DO NOT DROP. Never mix these materials with other chemicals. Never mix these materials with water. Examples Ethylene Oxide Chlorine

15 Consumer Product Warning Symbols  Consumer Warning Labels are used on products that can be found on store shelves.  These symbols are similar to the WHMIS industrial symbols with the exception of the outer boarder.  Each outer border designates the product’s level of danger DANGERWARNINGCAUTION Highest level of hazardModerate hazard levelLowest hazard level

16 Corrosive  Please refer back to WHMIS Class E for more information on the effects of exposure and handling tips. Examples Bleach Battery Acid Dishwasher Detergent

17 Explosive  Consumer products under this category have the potential to explode if exposed to heat or physical shock.  Handling Tips: Always handle the container with care, DO NOT DROP. Always keep containers away from heat or flame. Examples Fire Extinguishers Aerosols

18 Flammable  Please refer back to WHMIS Class B for more information on the effects of exposure and handling tips. Examples Isopropyl Alcohol Gasoline

19 Poison  Please refer back to WHMIS Class D for more information on the effects of exposure and handling tips. Examples Bleach Gasoline Wind Shield Washer Fluid

20 MEANS OF EXPOSURE

21 Acute vs Chronic Effects  Acute Effect Exposure causes immediate harm to your health (inside and/or out). The effects of exposure can occur within a few minutes, a few hours or a few days.  Chronic Effect Exposure causes harm to your health over a longer period of time. The effects of exposure can occur months or years after the exposure occurred.

22 Measuring Acute Toxicity  Lethal Dose 50 (LD 50 ) The amount of material that causes death in 50% of the test patients when it is introduced into their body by a specified route. Usually method of exposure is ingestion or skin absorption It is usually measured in mg/kg or mL/kg of body weight Higher LD 50 = Lower toxicity Lower LD 50 = Higher toxicity

23 Measuring Acute Toxicity (continued)  Lethal Concentration 50 (LC 50 ) The airborne concentration of the substance that causes death in 50% of the test patients in a given time frame. Usually expose patients for 4 hours. It is usually measured in mg/kg or mL/kg of body weight Higher LC 50 = Lower toxicity Lower LC 50 = Higher toxicity

24 Routes of Entry INHALATIONABSORPTIONINJECTIONINGESTION MOST COMMON LEAST COMMON Inhalation can cause more harm to the body than any other route of entry. Absorption allows for direct access to the blood stream; therefore, can cause damage externally and internally. Injection is when a material is forced into the body; for example, an injection. Ingestion is an accidental form of exposure. It is easily preventable following proper hygiene protocols. MOST IMPORTANT LEAST IMPORTANT

25 WORKPLACE CONTROLS

26 Sample Supplier Labels Product Identification Chemical name Brand/generic name Code name/number Hazard Symbols The label must have a symbol for every category the product is classified under. Etched boarder is unique to WHMIS materials. Supplier Identification Name, address, phone number Reference to the MSDS Refer to Material Safety Data Sheet for more information. First Aid Measures If ingested, contact a physician immediately and do not induce vomiting Flush skin/eyes immediately for 15 minutes Precautionary Measures Store in a temperature controlled environment Wear protective eye wear Do not spray near heat/flame/spark Risk Phrases Respiratory irritant Highly irritating to skin, eyes and nose

27 Workplace Label  A workplace label must be used for hazardous material when: It is transferred to a secondary container (for example: isopropyl alcohol, hydrogen peroxide, peroxigard) The original (supplier) label is missing or damaged DO NOT USE ANY CHEMICAL MATERIAL THAT IS NOT LABELLED.

28 Workplace Label Requirements “ABC Cleaner” Wear a face shield Wear rubber gloves Wear a respirator Refer to the MSDS for further information Product Identification Precautionary Measures Reference to MSDS

29 Sample Workplace Labels

30 Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)  A Material Safety Data Sheet is a document that provides detailed health and safety information specific to the material.  The content of the MSDS is legislated by WHMIS and includes 9 sections. Every section must be completed for every hazardous material. If the information is unavailable or inapplicable for a particular product, then it must be stated in the MSDS.  The supplier must update the MSDS every 3 years or within 90 days of a change to the product.

31 9 Sections to The MSDS 1. Product identification and use 2. Hazardous chemical content 3. Physical information: boiling point, etc. 4. Fire or explosion hazards 5. Reactivity information (with other materials )

32 MSDS (continued) 6. Toxicological information – describes the potential risks to your health. Examples Effects of acute/chronic exposureSynergistic Products Reproductive ProblemsExposure Limits Routes of EntryCancer Producing Producing Fetal MalformationInduce genetic mutations SensitizationIrritancy

33 MSDS (continued) 7. Preventative measures – provides safety guidelines for the use and storage of the material. Examples Personal Protective EquipmentWaste Disposal Leak/Spill ProceduresHandling Procedures Storage RequirementsShipping Requirements

34 MSDS (continued) 8. First Aid Measures a) Eye wash station b) Emergency showers c) First aid – bandaging, splinting d) CPR 9. MSDS Source – supplier’s name and address  Click here to see a sample MSDS for Bleach. Click here to see a sample MSDS for Bleach.

35 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)  PPE is necessary when engineering and/or administrative controls cannot completely remove the hazard to workers.  The purpose of PPE Is to minimize the exposure to hazardous materials in the workplace.  Employers are responsible for: Supplying appropriate PPE Ensuring PPE is in good working order Providing training to all workers on when and how to use the PPE

36 PPE Symbols Cartridge Respirator Eye Protection Disposable Dust Mask Face Shield Foot Protection Full Body Protective Clothes Hand Protection Protective Apron

37 WHMIS AFTER GHS

38 Globally Harmonized System (GHS)  The Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS) is an international initiative to standardize chemical hazard classification and communication globally. The GHS is anticipated to be implemented in Canada in June  GHS will not replace WHMIS. WHMIS will be modified to incorporate the GHS elements.

39 GHS (continued)  Under GHS, there will be new standardized: 1. Classification Rules Provides guidance on classifying pure chemicals and mixtures according to its criteria or rules 2. Label Requirements Standardized hazard statements Signal words Symbols Precautionary statements may also be required 3. Safety Data Sheet (SDS) Format This document will replace the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) that are currently used under WHMIS They will have 16 sections in a set order, and minimum information prescribed

40 GHS (continued)  Please review the following documents for a full understanding of how the GHS elements will change WHMIS. Supplier Labels After GHS Safety Data Sheets vs Material Safety Data Sheets Symbols: GHS vs WHMIS Additional Hazard Classes

41 TIME FOR THE QUIZ! WHMIS Quiz Please print and submit your answers to the RRP office (by mail, or fax). A certificate will be issued upon receipt of your quiz. WHMIS Quiz


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