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Using Value Disciplines in Organizational Change Peter D. Nordgren University of Wisconsin-Superior Educause Midwest Regional Conference March 13 th, 2007.

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Presentation on theme: "Using Value Disciplines in Organizational Change Peter D. Nordgren University of Wisconsin-Superior Educause Midwest Regional Conference March 13 th, 2007."— Presentation transcript:

1 Using Value Disciplines in Organizational Change Peter D. Nordgren University of Wisconsin-Superior Educause Midwest Regional Conference March 13 th, 2007 Peter D. Nordgren University of Wisconsin-Superior Educause Midwest Regional Conference March 13 th, 2007 Copyright Peter D. Nordgren, This work is the intellectual property of the author. Permission is granted for this material to be shared for non-commercial, educational purposes, provided that this copyright statement appears on the reproduced materials and notice is given that the copying is by permission of the author. To disseminate otherwise or to republish requires written permission from the author.

2 Convergence of Service Groups Academic computing Administrative computing Educational media Communication services/networks Development/training Academic computing Administrative computing Educational media Communication services/networks Development/training

3 UW-Superior One of 13 four year UW universities Designated as the UW liberal arts college 2,800 Students 80% commuters Significant regional service/distance learning mission UW-Superior One of 13 four year UW universities Designated as the UW liberal arts college 2,800 Students 80% commuters Significant regional service/distance learning mission

4 Technology organization convergence at UW-Superior Academic Computing & Networking Administrative Computing Media Resources Network & Programming Computing & Media Technology Services

5 Challenge: finding a common vocabulary “We don’t seem to understand each other’s roles” “They don’t value what we do” “We don’t seem to understand each other’s roles” “They don’t value what we do”

6 Marc Eichen’s “Value Disciplines: A Lens for Successful Decision Making in IT” Educause Quarterly 29:2, 2006 Based on Treacy and Wiersema’s business leadership concepts There are three value disciplines Successful organizations must select and excel at one of the three disciplines as a core operating model, while remaining adept at the other two Based on Treacy and Wiersema’s business leadership concepts There are three value disciplines Successful organizations must select and excel at one of the three disciplines as a core operating model, while remaining adept at the other two

7 Eichen proposed value disciplines as a way to communicate mission and make decisions in providing technology services

8 We saw value disciplines as a way to explain the value differences within our organizations to each other – and to align our staff and services according to values

9 Operational Excellence Provide products and services at the lowest cost Pursue the highest levels of efficiency Service focuses on high levels of convenience Provide products and services at the lowest cost Pursue the highest levels of efficiency Service focuses on high levels of convenience

10 Operational Excellence Culture Disciplined teamwork Focused on processes Conformance, “One size fits all” mindset Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1997 Disciplined teamwork Focused on processes Conformance, “One size fits all” mindset Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1997

11 Customer Intimacy Provide products and services that best meet their customers’ needs Pursue the deepest levels of understanding of customers’ requirements, both technical and political Focus on developing a highly skilled workforce and giving them latitude to solve customer problems Provide products and services that best meet their customers’ needs Pursue the deepest levels of understanding of customers’ requirements, both technical and political Focus on developing a highly skilled workforce and giving them latitude to solve customer problems

12 Customer Intimacy Culture Client and field driven Focused on information gathering and communication Variation: “Have it your way” mindset Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1997 Client and field driven Focused on information gathering and communication Variation: “Have it your way” mindset Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1997

13 Product Leadership Provide cutting-edge products or services Pursue the highest levels of innovation Service focuses on high levels of creative thinking, flexibility, and knowledge transfer Provide cutting-edge products or services Pursue the highest levels of innovation Service focuses on high levels of creative thinking, flexibility, and knowledge transfer

14 Product Leadership Culture Concept and future driven Focused on action, “going for it” Experimentation, “outside the box” mindset Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1997 Concept and future driven Focused on action, “going for it” Experimentation, “outside the box” mindset Treacy & Wiersema, The Discipline of Market Leaders, 1997

15 Technology organization convergence at UW-Superior “We implemented PeopleSoft on time and under budget” “We save the university $60,000 annually on phone services” “We found open source software to maintain the university website” Network & Programming Computing & Media Technology Services Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy “We respond to helpdesk contacts within two hours” “We make sure classroom technology is ready to use every day” “We consult with staff to select hardware and software”

16 Technology Services UW-Superior Operational Excellence Application Services Support Services Infrastructure Services Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy Operational Excellence

17 University Value Disciplines Operational Excellence Technology Services Academics Student Svcs Business Services Library Customer Intimacy Operational Excellence Customer Intimacy

18 Is there a pattern in value disciplines among different technology service groups? Survey of UW System technology councils Statements about priorities in providing services, 5 point scale, 4 questions for each value discipline Is there a pattern in value disciplines among different technology service groups? Survey of UW System technology councils Statements about priorities in providing services, 5 point scale, 4 questions for each value discipline

19 UW System Survey Groups EMTC – Educational Media Technology Council – classroom technology, media development, distance learning/videoconferencing services n=13 ITMC – Information Technology Management Council – administrative and academic computing, network services n=23 LTDC – Learning Technology Development Council – Faculty technology development, online learning services n=8 EMTC – Educational Media Technology Council – classroom technology, media development, distance learning/videoconferencing services n=13 ITMC – Information Technology Management Council – administrative and academic computing, network services n=23 LTDC – Learning Technology Development Council – Faculty technology development, online learning services n=8

20 Statistical Analysis – Chi-Square Sample too small for effective analysis at.05 Approaching significant differences: ITMC vs LTDC – one question each of Operational Efficiency, Customer Intimacy, Product Leadership Sample too small for effective analysis at.05 Approaching significant differences: ITMC vs LTDC – one question each of Operational Efficiency, Customer Intimacy, Product Leadership

21 Graphical Analysis Twelve charts - one for each question Comparative responses of each technology service group on the 5 point scale Twelve charts - one for each question Comparative responses of each technology service group on the 5 point scale

22 Operational Excellence Creating an efficient structure and organization in technology services Operational Excellence Creating an efficient structure and organization in technology services

23 Operational Excellence Planning and implementing services that provide a high level of return on investment

24 Operational Excellence Reducing costs while maintaining quality

25 Operational Excellence Improving efficiency and convenience in the university's services Operational Excellence Improving efficiency and convenience in the university's services

26 Customer Intimacy Obtaining information about user needs, and using the information to improve services

27 Customer Intimacy Designing and implementing products that closely meet the expressed needs of students, faculty, and staff Customer Intimacy Designing and implementing products that closely meet the expressed needs of students, faculty, and staff

28 Customer Intimacy Working closely with technology users to help them use tools and systems Customer Intimacy Working closely with technology users to help them use tools and systems

29 Customer Intimacy Working to closely link development processes with identified user needs Customer Intimacy Working to closely link development processes with identified user needs

30 Product Leadership Helping the university understand and adopt new and emerging technologies Product Leadership Helping the university understand and adopt new and emerging technologies

31 Product Leadership Creating strategies for sharing new tools and ideas Product Leadership Creating strategies for sharing new tools and ideas

32 Product Leadership Keeping up with students as they bring new technology ideas and expectations Product Leadership Keeping up with students as they bring new technology ideas and expectations

33 Product Leadership Working to maintain the university's level of involvement with advanced technologies Product Leadership Working to maintain the university's level of involvement with advanced technologies

34 Conclusions Value disciplines can provide one form of common vocabulary for discussing differences during times of organizational change There may be consistent differences in value disciplines among different types of technology service groups, but more research is needed Value disciplines can provide one form of common vocabulary for discussing differences during times of organizational change There may be consistent differences in value disciplines among different types of technology service groups, but more research is needed

35 References Eichen, M. Value Disciplines: A Lens for Successful Decision Making in IT. Educause Quarterly, 29:2 (2006), Treacy, M., and Wiersema, F. The Discipline of Market Leaders. Perseus, 1997 Nordgren, P. Technology Service Strategies Survey, https://lgr.uwsuper.edu/phpesp/public/survey.php? name=techstrathttps://lgr.uwsuper.edu/phpesp/public/survey.php? name=techstrat Contact: Eichen, M. Value Disciplines: A Lens for Successful Decision Making in IT. Educause Quarterly, 29:2 (2006), Treacy, M., and Wiersema, F. The Discipline of Market Leaders. Perseus, 1997 Nordgren, P. Technology Service Strategies Survey, https://lgr.uwsuper.edu/phpesp/public/survey.php? name=techstrathttps://lgr.uwsuper.edu/phpesp/public/survey.php? name=techstrat Contact:


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