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Abnormal Psychology, Twelfth Edition by Ann M. Kring, Sheri L. Johnson, Gerald C. Davison, & John M. Neale & John M. Neale © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

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Presentation on theme: "Abnormal Psychology, Twelfth Edition by Ann M. Kring, Sheri L. Johnson, Gerald C. Davison, & John M. Neale & John M. Neale © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc."— Presentation transcript:

1 Abnormal Psychology, Twelfth Edition by Ann M. Kring, Sheri L. Johnson, Gerald C. Davison, & John M. Neale & John M. Neale © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

2  Chapter 15: Personality and Personality Disorders I. Comparing Personality Assessment in the DSM-IV-TR and the Proposed DSM-5 II. Personality Disorder Types III. Treatment of Personality Disorders Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

3  Longstanding, pervasive, inflexible, extreme, and persistent patterns of behavior and inner experience Unstable positive sense of self Unstable positive sense of self Unable to sustain close relationships Unable to sustain close relationships  Profound changes in personality diagnoses from DSM-IV-TR to DSM-5 10 diagnoses in DSM-IV-TR; 6 diagnoses in DSM-5 10 diagnoses in DSM-IV-TR; 6 diagnoses in DSM-5 DSM-5 includes personality trait dimensions DSM-5 includes personality trait dimensions  Reasons for changes: Half who met diagnostic criteria for one DSM-IV-TR personality disorder met diagnostic criteria for another personality disorder Half who met diagnostic criteria for one DSM-IV-TR personality disorder met diagnostic criteria for another personality disorder Some of the DSM-IV-TR personality diagnoses are rare (< 2%) Some of the DSM-IV-TR personality diagnoses are rare (< 2%) Many people who seem to have serious personality problems do not fit any of the personality disorder diagnoses Many people who seem to have serious personality problems do not fit any of the personality disorder diagnoses Individuals with a personality disorder can vary a good deal from one another in the nature of their personality traits and the severity of their condition Individuals with a personality disorder can vary a good deal from one another in the nature of their personality traits and the severity of their condition To capture subsyndromal symptoms better To capture subsyndromal symptoms better © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

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7  DSM-5 adds dimensional personality trait dimension to familiar diagnostic approach Dimensional personality traits related to many aspects of psychological adjustment, physical outcomes, and interpersonal outcomes Dimensional personality traits related to many aspects of psychological adjustment, physical outcomes, and interpersonal outcomes  DSM-5 includes four types of personality ratings: Levels of personality functioning scale Levels of personality functioning scale Six personality disorder types Six personality disorder types Five personality trait domain ratings as well as 25 facet ratings to describe the more specific dimensions within each of the five domains Five personality trait domain ratings as well as 25 facet ratings to describe the more specific dimensions within each of the five domains Criteria for a personality disorder Criteria for a personality disorder © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

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9  Two broad areas of impairment related to personality disorders: Disturbances in one’s sense of self or identity Disturbances in one’s sense of self or identity Chronic interpersonal disturbances Chronic interpersonal disturbances  Rating scale created for self and interpersonal functioning © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

10  Self: Identity: Experience of oneself as unique, with clear boundaries between self and others; stability of self-esteem and accuracy of self-appraisal; capacity for, and ability to regulate, a range of emotional experience Identity: Experience of oneself as unique, with clear boundaries between self and others; stability of self-esteem and accuracy of self-appraisal; capacity for, and ability to regulate, a range of emotional experience Self-direction: Pursuit of coherent and meaningful short-term and life goals; utilization of constructive and prosocial internal standards of behavior; ability to self-reflect productively Self-direction: Pursuit of coherent and meaningful short-term and life goals; utilization of constructive and prosocial internal standards of behavior; ability to self-reflect productively  Interpersonal: Empathy: Comprehension and appreciation of others’ experiences and motivations; tolerance of differing perspectives; understanding of the effects of own behavior on others Empathy: Comprehension and appreciation of others’ experiences and motivations; tolerance of differing perspectives; understanding of the effects of own behavior on others Intimacy: Depth and duration of positive connections with others; desire and capacity for closeness; mutuality of regard reflected in interpersonal behavior Intimacy: Depth and duration of positive connections with others; desire and capacity for closeness; mutuality of regard reflected in interpersonal behavior  Rate the overall degree of impairment in self and interpersonal functioning: 0 No impairment 0 No impairment 1 Mild impairment 1 Mild impairment 2 Moderate impairment 2 Moderate impairment 3 Serious impairment 3 Serious impairment 4 Extreme impairment 4 Extreme impairment © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

11  If moderate impairment is present on Levels of Personality Functioning Scale, next step is to evaluate for DSM-5 personality disorder types Personality disorder, ‘trait specified’ is used, and then the specific maladaptive trait is noted, when no personality disorder matches   e.g., Personality disorder, high paranoia  DSM-5 uses prototype approach Person matched on a scale of 1 (no match) to 5 (very good match) Person matched on a scale of 1 (no match) to 5 (very good match) Prototypes supplemented with personality domains and facets Prototypes supplemented with personality domains and facets  DSM-5 has adapted the Five-Factor Model of Personality 5 personality domains: negative affectivity, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, psychoticism 5 personality domains: negative affectivity, detachment, antagonism, disinhibition, psychoticism Each domain (factor) is comprised of multiple facets; total of 25 facets Each domain (factor) is comprised of multiple facets; total of 25 facets © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

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13  Significant impairments in self and interpersonal functioning  At least one pathological personality trait domain or facet  The personality impairments are stable across time (persistent) and pervasive (consistent across situations)  The personality impairments are not explained by developmental stage, socio- cultural environment, substance abuse, another psychological condition, or a medical condition © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

14  A perfectionist  Preoccupied with rules, details, schedules, and organization  Overly focused on work Little time for leisure, family, & friends Little time for leisure, family, & friends  Reluctant to make decisions or delegate  “Control freaks” Rigid and inflexible, especially morality Rigid and inflexible, especially morality  OCPD different from OCD Does not have the obsessions/compulsions of OCD Does not have the obsessions/compulsions of OCD  Most frequently comorbid with Avoidant PD  Very little research into etiology © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

15  Intense need for order and control, as shown by the presence of at least four of the following beginning by early adulthood and evidenced in many contexts: Preoccupation with rules, details, and organization to the extent that the point of an activity is lost Preoccupation with rules, details, and organization to the extent that the point of an activity is lost Extreme perfectionism interferes with task completion Extreme perfectionism interferes with task completion Excessive devotion to work to the exclusion of leisure and friendships Excessive devotion to work to the exclusion of leisure and friendships Inflexibility about morals and values Inflexibility about morals and values Difficulty discarding worthless items Difficulty discarding worthless items Reluctance to delegate unless others conform to one’s standards Reluctance to delegate unless others conform to one’s standards Miserliness Miserliness Rigidity and stubbornness Rigidity and stubbornness © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

16  Need for order, precision, and perfection  Activities approached in super-methodical and overly detailed way  Intense concerns with time and rules  Overdeveloped sense of duty and obligation  Perfectionism may result in a paralysis of indecision  Strong emotions (both negative and positive) are rarely expressed  Intermittent insecurity and anxiety over perceived deficiencies © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

17  Pathological personality traits in the following domains and facets: 1. Compulsivity, characterized by rigid perfectionism 2. Negative affectivity, characterized by perseveration Note: Facets are printed in blue © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

18  Grandiose view of self Preoccupied with fantasies of success Preoccupied with fantasies of success  Self-centered Demands constant attention and adulation Demands constant attention and adulation Lack of empathy Lack of empathy Feelings of arrogance, envy, entitlement Feelings of arrogance, envy, entitlement  Sensitive to criticism Enraged when not admired Enraged when not admired  Seeks out high-status partners  Most frequently comorbid with Borderline PD © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

19  Presence of five or more of the following shown by early adulthood in many contexts: Grandiose view of one’s importance Grandiose view of one’s importance Preoccupation with one’s success, brilliance, beauty Preoccupation with one’s success, brilliance, beauty Belief that one is special and can be understood only by other high-status people Belief that one is special and can be understood only by other high-status people Extreme need for admiration Extreme need for admiration Tendency to exploit others Tendency to exploit others Lack of empathy Lack of empathy Envious of others Envious of others Arrogant behavior or attitudes Arrogant behavior or attitudes © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

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21  Kohut’s Self-Psychology Model Characteristics mask low self-esteem Characteristics mask low self-esteem In childhood, narcissist valued as a means to increase parent’s own self-esteem In childhood, narcissist valued as a means to increase parent’s own self-esteem  Not valued for his or her own competency and self worth Parental emotional coldness and overemphasis on child’s achievements reported by narcissists Parental emotional coldness and overemphasis on child’s achievements reported by narcissists  Social cognitive model Narcissist has low self-esteem Narcissist has low self-esteem Interpersonal relationships are a way to bolster sagging self- esteem rather than increase closeness to others Interpersonal relationships are a way to bolster sagging self- esteem rather than increase closeness to others Lab studies reveal cognitive biases that maintain narcissism Lab studies reveal cognitive biases that maintain narcissism © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

22  Unusual and eccentric thoughts and behaviors (psychoticism), interpersonal detachment, and suspiciousness  Odd beliefs or magical thinking Telepathic, clairvoyant, ideas of reference Telepathic, clairvoyant, ideas of reference  Illusions Feels the presence of a force or person not actually present Feels the presence of a force or person not actually present  Odd/eccentric behavior or appearance Wears strange clothes Wears strange clothes Talks to self Talks to self  Affect is flat; aloof from others © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

23  Similar to schizophrenia Individuals with schizotypal PD show problems similar to those found in schizophrenia Individuals with schizotypal PD show problems similar to those found in schizophrenia  Highly heritable (~60%)  Cognitive and neuropsychological deficits  Enlarged ventricles  Less temporal gray matter © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

24  Presence of five or more of the following in many contexts beginning in early adulthood: Ideas of reference Ideas of reference Peculiar beliefs or magical thinking, e.g., belief in extrasensory perception Peculiar beliefs or magical thinking, e.g., belief in extrasensory perception Unusual perceptions, e.g., distorted feelings about one’s body Unusual perceptions, e.g., distorted feelings about one’s body Peculiar patterns of thought and speech Peculiar patterns of thought and speech Suspiciousness or paranoia Suspiciousness or paranoia Inappropriate or restricted affect Inappropriate or restricted affect Odd or eccentric behavior or appearance Odd or eccentric behavior or appearance Lack of close friends Lack of close friends Anxiety around other people that does not diminish with familiarity Anxiety around other people that does not diminish with familiarity © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

25   Discomfort with and reduced capacity for interpersonal relationships   Few close friends or relationships   Anxiety even in familiar social situations, including perception of being an outcast, feel disconnected from others, suspiciousness of others   Eccentric, odd, or peculiar appearance or manner   Vague, circumstantial, overly elaborate, impoverished, or otherwise unusual speech   Limited range of emotions and inhibited emotional expression   Cognitive and perceptual distortions   Odd beliefs, such as belief in superstitions, clairvoyance, or telepathy   Perceptions of reality can become more unusual under stress   Symptoms such as pseudo-hallucinations, sensory illusions, overvalued ideas, mild paranoid ideation, or transient psychotic episodes © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

26  Pathological personality traits in the following domains and facets: 1. Psychoticism, characterized by eccentricity, cognitive and perceptual dysregulation, and unusual beliefs and experiences 2. Detachment, characterized by restricted affectivity and withdrawal 3. Negative Affectivity, characterized by suspiciousness Note: Facets are printed in blue © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

27  Fears criticism, rejection or disapproval  Avoids interpersonal situations  Restrained and inhibited in interpersonal situations Feelings of inadequacy, inferiority Feelings of inadequacy, inferiority  Avoids taking risks or trying new activities Does not want to risk embarrassment Does not want to risk embarrassment  High comorbidity with social anxiety disorder Related to Japanese syndrome called taijin kyofusho (taijin means “interpersonal” and kyofusho means “fear”) Related to Japanese syndrome called taijin kyofusho (taijin means “interpersonal” and kyofusho means “fear”)  High comorbidity with major depression © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

28  A pervasive pattern of social inhibition, feelings of inadequacy, and hypersensitivity to criticism as shown by four or more of the following starting in early adulthood in many contexts: Avoidance of occupational activities that involve significant interpersonal contact, because of fears of criticism or disapproval Avoidance of occupational activities that involve significant interpersonal contact, because of fears of criticism or disapproval Unwilling to get involved with people unless certain of being liked Unwilling to get involved with people unless certain of being liked Restrained in intimate relationships because of the fear of being shamed or ridiculed Restrained in intimate relationships because of the fear of being shamed or ridiculed Preoccupation with being criticized or rejected Preoccupation with being criticized or rejected Inhibited in new interpersonal situations because of feelings of inadequacy Inhibited in new interpersonal situations because of feelings of inadequacy Views self as socially inept or inferior Views self as socially inept or inferior Unusually reluctant to try new activities because they may prove embarrassing Unusually reluctant to try new activities because they may prove embarrassing © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

29  Negative sense of self and profound sense of inadequacy  Inhibition in establishing intimate interpersonal relationships  Feelings of being inadequate, inferior, socially inept, and personally unappealing  Unrealistically high standards for themselves  May have a desire to be recognized by others as special and unique  Shyness and social avoidance  Preoccupation with being criticized or rejected by others  Reluctance to disclose personal information for fear of disapproval or rejection  Few close friendships  Intimate relationships are avoided  Tendency to blame themselves for bad things that happen and to find little pleasure in life’s activities  Emotionally inhibited  Difficulty expressing wishes, emotions, and impulses  May be passive and unassertive about pursuing personal goals © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

30  Pathological personality traits in the following domains and facets: 1. Detachment, characterized by withdrawal, intimacy avoidance, and anhedonia 2. Negative Affectivity, characterized by anxiousness Note: Facets are printed in blue © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

31  Pervasive disregard for the rights of others  Pattern of irresponsible behaviors Poor work record, breaking laws, being irritable and physically aggressive, defaulting on debts, being reckless and impulsive, neglecting to plan ahead, little regard for truth, and little remorse for their misdeeds Poor work record, breaking laws, being irritable and physically aggressive, defaulting on debts, being reckless and impulsive, neglecting to plan ahead, little regard for truth, and little remorse for their misdeeds  Diagnosis of Conduct disorder before age 15 was required in DSM-IV-TR; dropped in DSM-5 Truancy, running away, lying, theft, arson, destruction of property Truancy, running away, lying, theft, arson, destruction of property  Much more common in men than women  Comorbid substance use very common © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

32  Age at least 18  Evidence of conduct disorder before age 15  Pervasive pattern of disregard for the rights of others since the age of 15 as shown by at least three of the following: 1. Repeated law breaking 1. Repeated law breaking 2. Deceitfulness, lying 2. Deceitfulness, lying 3. Impulsivity 3. Impulsivity 4. Irritability and aggressiveness 4. Irritability and aggressiveness 5. Reckless disregard for own safety and that of others 5. Reckless disregard for own safety and that of others 6. Irresponsibility as seen in unreliable employment or financial history 6. Irresponsibility as seen in unreliable employment or financial history 7. Lack of remorse 7. Lack of remorse © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

33  Arrogance and entitlement  Grandiose, exaggerated sense of self-importance  Primarily motivated by self-serving goals  Will manipulate, exploit, deceive, or otherwise take advantage of others to achieve their goals  Little empathy for others’ feelings  Disregard for the rights, property, or safety of others  Little or no remorse or guilt if they harm others  May act aggressively towards others in pursuit of personal agenda  May derive satisfaction from humiliating or hurting others  May show superficial charm  Minimal investment in conventional moral principles  Tempermentally aggressive  Reckless sensation-seeking and impulsive tendencies  Emotional expression is mostly limited to irritability, anger, and hostility  Often engage in unlawful and criminal behavior  May abuse alcohol and drugs  May commit physical violence to dominate others  Generally irresponsible about work or financial commitments  Often have problems with authority figures © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

34  Pathological personality traits in the following domains and facets: 1. Antagonism, characterized by manipulativeness, deceitfulness, callousness, and hostility 2. Disinhibition, characterized by irresponsibility, impulsivity, and risk taking Note: Facets are printed in blue © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

35  Psychopathy (sociopathy) (Cleckley) Predates DSM diagnosis Predates DSM diagnosis  Focuses on internal thoughts and feelings Poverty of emotion Poverty of emotion  Negative emotions  Lacks shame, remorse and anxiety; does not learn from mistakes  Positive emotions  Merely an act used to manipulate others; superficially charming Impulsivity Impulsivity  Behave irresponsibly for thrills  Psychopathy Checklist – revised (Hare) Scale used to assess  DSM-IV-TR divergent with psychopathy concept Emphasized observable behaviors rather than emotional experiences Emphasized observable behaviors rather than emotional experiences Specified age of onset by 15 years Specified age of onset by 15 years  DSM-5 more in line with psychopathy concept © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

36  Problems with research Conducted with mostly with criminals Conducted with mostly with criminals Different measurements (APD vs. psychopathy) Different measurements (APD vs. psychopathy)  Genetics Antisocial behavior heritable (40-50%) Antisocial behavior heritable (40-50%) Genetic risk for APD, psychopathy, conduct disorder, and substance abuse related Genetic risk for APD, psychopathy, conduct disorder, and substance abuse related  Family environment Lack of warmth, high negativity, and parental inconsistency predict APD Lack of warmth, high negativity, and parental inconsistency predict APD Poverty, exposure to violence Poverty, exposure to violence Family environment interacts with genetics Family environment interacts with genetics © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

37  Fearlessness Lack of fear or anxiety Lack of fear or anxiety Low baseline levels of skin conductance; less reactive to aversive stimuli Low baseline levels of skin conductance; less reactive to aversive stimuli  Impulsivity Lack of response to threat when pursuing rewards Lack of response to threat when pursuing rewards  Deficits in empathy Not in tune with the emotional reactions of others Not in tune with the emotional reactions of others © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

38  Impulsive, self-damaging behaviors  Unstable, stormy, intense relationships  Emotional reactivity Feelings towards others can change drastically and inexplicably very quickly Feelings towards others can change drastically and inexplicably very quickly Emotions are intense, erratic, shift abruptly-often from passionate idealization to contemptuous anger Emotions are intense, erratic, shift abruptly-often from passionate idealization to contemptuous anger  Frantic efforts to avoid abandonment  Unstable sense of self  Anger-control problems  Chronic feelings of emptiness  Recurrent suicidal gestures  Transient psychotic or dissociative symptoms © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

39  Later in life, most no longer meet diagnostic criteria  Cormorbidity high with PTSD, MDD, substance- related, eating disorders, and schizotypal PD Comorbidity predicts less chance of symptom remission Comorbidity predicts less chance of symptom remission © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

40  Presence of five or more of the following in many contexts beginning in early adulthood: Frantic efforts to avoid abandonment Frantic efforts to avoid abandonment Unstable interpersonal relationships in which others are either idealized or devalued Unstable interpersonal relationships in which others are either idealized or devalued Unstable sense of self Unstable sense of self Self-damaging, impulsive behaviors in at least two areas, such as spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating Self-damaging, impulsive behaviors in at least two areas, such as spending, sex, substance abuse, reckless driving, binge eating Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or self-injurious behavior (e.g., cutting self) Recurrent suicidal behavior, gestures, or self-injurious behavior (e.g., cutting self) Chronic feelings of emptiness Chronic feelings of emptiness Recurrent bouts of intense or poorly controlled anger Recurrent bouts of intense or poorly controlled anger During stress, a tendency to experience transient paranoid thoughts and dissociative symptoms During stress, a tendency to experience transient paranoid thoughts and dissociative symptoms © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

41  Extremely fragile self-concept that is easily disrupted under stress  Lack of identity or chronic feelings of emptiness  Difficulty maintaining enduring intimate relationships  Tendencies towards self-loathing, rage, and despondency  Rapidly changing, intense, and unpredictable emotions  May engage in verbal or physical acts of aggression when angry  Intense emotional reactions to negative interpersonal loss or disappointment  Excessive dependency  Intense fear of loss, abandonment, or rejection by significant others  Intense, intimate involvement with another person often leads to a fear of loss of identity as an individual  Highly unstable relationships  Cognitive functions may become impaired at times of interpersonal stress  Paranoia and dissociation may progress to transient psychosis  Impulsivity and frequent engagement in activities with potentially negative consequences  May engage in acts of self-harm (e.g., cutting, burning), suicidal ideation and suicide attempts when an important relationship is disrupted  May be prone to substance misuse, reckless driving, binge eating, promiscuous sex, or other risky behaviors © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

42  Pathological personality traits in the following domains and facets: 1. Negative Affectivity, characterized by emotional lability, anxiousness, separation insecurity, and depressivity 2. Disinhibition, characterized by impulsivity and risk taking 3. Antagonism, characterized by hostility Note: Facets are printed in blue © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

43  Genetic component Highly heritable (60%) Highly heritable (60%) May play a role in impulsivity and emotional dysregulation May play a role in impulsivity and emotional dysregulation  Decreased functioning of serotonin system  Increased activation of amygdala © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

44  Parental separation, verbal and emotional abuse during childhood  Linehan’s Diathesis-Stress Theory Individuals with BPD have difficulty controlling their emotions (emotional dysregulation) Individuals with BPD have difficulty controlling their emotions (emotional dysregulation)  Possible biological diathesis Family invalidates or discounts emotional experiences and expression Family invalidates or discounts emotional experiences and expression Interaction between extreme emotional reactivity and invalidating family → BPD Interaction between extreme emotional reactivity and invalidating family → BPD © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

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47  Schizotypal PD: Antipsychotic and antidepressant medications  Avoidant PD: Same treatments as Social anxiety disorder Antidepressant medications Antidepressant medications Social skills training Social skills training  Psychopathy: psychotherapy: either CBT or psychodynamic © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

48  Difficult to treat Interpersonal problems play out in therapy Interpersonal problems play out in therapy Attempts to manipulate therapist Attempts to manipulate therapist  Medications Antidepressants Antidepressants Mood stabilizers Mood stabilizers  Dialectical Behavioral Therapy (Linehan, 1987) Acceptance and empathy plus CBT Acceptance and empathy plus CBT Emotion-regulation techniques Emotion-regulation techniques Social skills training Social skills training  Mentalization-based therapy Fail to think about their own and other’s feelings Fail to think about their own and other’s feelings  Schema-focused cognitive therapy Identify maladaptive assumptions that underlie cognitions Identify maladaptive assumptions that underlie cognitions © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

49 Copyright 2012 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved. No part of the material protected by this copyright may be reproduced or utilized in any form or by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying, recording or by any information storage and retrieval system, without written permission of the copyright owner. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.


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