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Stop it Now! A programme to prevent child sexual abuse in the UK and Netherlands: Research findings and launch of the European Toolkit. #preventingCSA.

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Presentation on theme: "Stop it Now! A programme to prevent child sexual abuse in the UK and Netherlands: Research findings and launch of the European Toolkit. #preventingCSA."— Presentation transcript:

1 Stop it Now! A programme to prevent child sexual abuse in the UK and Netherlands: Research findings and launch of the European Toolkit. #preventingCSA

2 Housekeeping

3 Launch of UK research findings Dr Carol McNaughton Nicholls, NatCen Social Research

4 Contents  Introduction and context  Project  Methods  Effects  Conclusion

5 Introduction and context

6 5 Definition..the involvement of a child in sexual activity that he or she does not fully comprehend, is unable to give informed consent to, or for which the child is not developmentally prepared, or else that violate the laws or social taboos of society. Children can be sexually abused by adults or other children who are – by virtue of their age or stage of development – in a position of responsibility, trust, or power over the victim. World Health Organisation, 2006: 10

7 Scale DescriptionFigureSource UK Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey (APMS) – 10% of adults experienced ‘uncomfortable sexual talk’ and 8% ‘unwanted sexual touching’ before age 16. Bebbington et al, 2011 UK One in 20 children aged 11 to 17 had experienced contact sexual abuse, and 34% of children abused by an adult, and 82% of those abused by a peer, did not tell anyone. Radford et al, 2011 Europe Estimate derived from aggregated research evidence is that one in five children in Europe has been a victim of sexual abuse. Council of Europe,

8 Online Scale DescriptionFigureSource Online At least 50,000 known individuals in the UK downloaded or produced child abuse images during CEOP, 2013 Online 88% of indecent images in offenders’ collections taken from their original source (often websites for young people) and uploaded to pornographic websites. IWF, 2012 Online Study of 21 European Union member states found that across Europe 15 per cent of 11 to 16 year-olds had received a sexual message online. Livingstone et al,

9 8 Individual and social impact

10 9 Theoretical framework  No single type of offence/offender  Different contextual needs/circumstances  Risk of offending is dynamic  Desistance is possible

11 10 Theoretical framework  Recognised protective factors Protective factors that may support desistence from sexual offending (de Vries Robbe et al, 2013). Healthy sexual interests Constructive social and professional support network Good problem solving Abstention from drug/alcohol misuse Capacity for emotional intimacy and satisfying relationships with other adults Capacity to set goals and work towards their achievement Engagement in constructive and rewarding employment or other activities Hopeful, optimistic, and motivated attitude to desistence

12 11 Purpose of research Inform and enhance efforts to tackle child sexual abuse - Researching the Stop it Now! Helpline and associated services in the UK and in the Netherlands.

13 12 Daphne III Funding Programme  EU provides financial support for activities with a focus on justice  Daphne III programme aims to contribute to protection of children, young people and women against violence  5 studies on perpetrator programmes and interventions

14 13 Project partners Lucy Faithfull Foundation de Waag The Prevention Project Dunkelfeld (Berlin) Save the Children Finland

15 Methods

16 15 Methods User feedback: opt-in approach and offer of anonymity  32 interviews and 2 focus groups (47 users)  112 questionnaire responses  Research Ethics Approval  Scoping work: desk based review and interviews with stakeholders  Economic analysis  Toolkit for establishing a helpline for potential/ actual abusers

17 Achieved sample Number taking part in interviews/ focus groups Number completing questionnaire Adults concerned about own behaviour 3250 Other adults who can play a role in preventing CSA 1419 Victims/survivors of CSA04 Professionals127 Reason for calling unknownN/A12 Total

18 Adults concerned about own feelings/ behaviour  All 32 interview/ focus group participants had committed a sexual offence and were known to the authorities.  29 committed internet offences  Profile of people who completed the questionnaire from this category: Accessed online CSA images28 Contacted a child online1 Sexual feelings towards children7 Considering accessing CSA images6 Concerned they may have sexual contact with a child1 17

19 Effects

20 Improved wellbeing/ability to self manage Recognise risky behaviour Belief in ability to change Techniques to manage behaviour Changed behaviour /circumstanc e Reduced risk Helpline Other services e.g. Inform, Inform Plus Securus GP, mental health specialist, social services

21 Recognise risk I'd convinced myself that…the pictures…I'd looked at, there was no victim 20

22 Belief in change 21 There is, there is someone to talk to, to say, 'Right, you know? There are steps you need to do to address these demons’ - you know?

23 Techniques to manage behaviour 22 I'm not saying I'm ever going to be cured, but the strategies are in place to stop me reoffending now.

24 Changed behaviour Of the 32 people who answered this part of the questionnaire, two thirds reported ‘they felt more able to manage their sexual thoughts’ and ‘more able to manage their sexual behaviour’ since using Stop! 23 No access to pornography Reduce time online Displacement activity – gym, reading

25 Strengthen other protective factors  Social networks  Relationships  Meaningful activity 24

26 Improved wellbeing/ability to self manage Recognise risky behaviour Belief in ability to change Techniques to manage behaviour Changed behaviour /circumstanc e Reduced risk Helpline Other services e.g. Inform, Inform Plus Securus GP, mental health specialist, social services

27 26 Theoretical framework  Recognised protective factors Protective factors that may support desistence from sexual offending (de Vries Robbe et al, 2013). Healthy sexual interests Constructive social and professional support network Good problem solving Abstention from drug/alcohol misuse Capacity for emotional intimacy and satisfying relationships with other adults Capacity to set goals and work towards their achievement Engagement in constructive and rewarding employment or other activities Hopeful, optimistic, and motivated attitude to desistence

28 Evidenced protective factors Impacts of Helpline on people concerned about their sexual thoughts or behaviour Ways in which Helpline contributed to impacts Healthy sexual interests  Enabling users to recognise the significant harm caused by child sexual abuse  Enabling abusers to manage their behaviour  Challenging beliefs that can contribute to sexual offending  Guiding and supporting users in specific strategies to reduce risk such as putting restrictions on internet use or finding healthy replacement activities to masturbation  Directing users to relevant resources on internet offending Capacity for emotional intimacy and satisfying relationships with other adults  Strengthening relationships between abusers and non-abusing partners  Advising users on the importance of close relationships and of how to tell their partner about their offending  Suggesting partners contact the Helpline for support Constructive social and professional support network  Reducing the risk of social isolation  Helping identify one or two key people to turn to for support  Advising on when and how to disclose offending to others Engagement in constructive and rewarding employment or other activities  Increasing engagement in productive and fulfilling activities  Advising users to remain in employment and increase time spent on activities such as reading; playing or watching sport; socialising with friends. Hopeful, optimistic, and motivated attitude to desistance  Improving emotional and psychological wellbeing  Enabling users to recognise that behaviour can be addressed  Strengthening motivation to desist  Guiding and supporting users in strategies to improve wellbeing (e.g. breathing exercises; regular exercise)  Helping users to recognise positive facets of their character  Recognising and highlighting positive achievements towards desistance  Explaining that users are responsible for their own behaviour and that change is possible. 27

29 28 For me, the, the difference it made to me was in a time of absolute desperation, no-one to talk to, not knowing who you can trust, who you can talk to - and my husband as well – it was a life saver.

30 If you would like further information please visit the website: Thank you


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