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9.1 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 9 Chapter Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications VIDEO CASES Case 1: Sinosteel Strengthens.

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Presentation on theme: "9.1 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 9 Chapter Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications VIDEO CASES Case 1: Sinosteel Strengthens."— Presentation transcript:

1 9.1 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 9 Chapter Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications VIDEO CASES Case 1: Sinosteel Strengthens Business Management with ERP Applications Case 2: Ingram Micro and H&R Block Get Close to Their Customers Instructional Video 1: Zara's" Wearing Today's Fashions With Supply Chain Management

2 9.2 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems How do enterprise systems help businesses achieve operational excellence? How do supply chain management systems coordinate planning, production, and logistics with suppliers? How do customer relationship management systems help firms achieve customer intimacy? What are the challenges posed by enterprise applications? How are enterprise applications used in platforms for new cross-functional services? Learning Objectives CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS 2012

3 9.3 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Cannondale Company

4 9.4 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Cannondale Company

5 9.5 © 2010 by Prentice Hall CannondaleCannondale Company

6 9.6 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Cannondale 學習如何管理全球供應鏈

7 9.7 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Tasty Baking Company: An Enterprise System Transforms an Old Favorite Problem – Managing parts in a constantly changing product line with suppliers in many countries Solution – Replace legacy MRPS with Kinaxis on- demand Rapid Response software service –Allows both Cannondale and suppliers to see up-to-date information; faster customer response; reduced inventory; reduced cycle and lead times Illustrates: Need for enterprise-wide system for coordinating supply chain Demonstrates: Use of cloud services as solution for implementing enterprise applications Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications

8 9.8 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Enterprise Systems Also called enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems Suite of integrated software modules and a common central database Collects data from many divisions of firm for use in nearly all of firm’s internal business activities Information entered in one process is immediately available for other processes Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications

9 9.9 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Enterprise Software Built around thousands of predefined business processes that reflect best practices Finance/accounting: General ledger, accounts payable, etc. Human resources: Personnel administration, payroll, etc. Manufacturing/production: Purchasing, shipping, etc. Sales/marketing: Order processing, billing, sales planning, etc. To implement, firms: Select functions of system they wish to use Map business processes to software processes Use software’s configuration tables for customizing Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Enterprise Systems

10 9.10 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Figure 9-1 Enterprise systems feature a set of integrated software modules and a central database that enables data to be shared by many different business processes and functional areas throughout the enterprise How Enterprise Systems Work Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Enterprise Systems

11 9.11 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Tasty Baking Company

12 9.12 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Business Value of Enterprise Systems Increase operational efficiency Provide firmwide information to support decision making Enable rapid responses to customer requests for information or products Include analytical tools to evaluate overall organizational performance Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Enterprise Systems

13 9.13 © 2010 by Prentice Hall The supply chain Network of organizations and processes for: Procuring raw materials Transforming them into products Distributing the products Upstream supply chain: Firm’s suppliers, suppliers’ suppliers, processes for managing relationships with them Downstream supply chain: Organizations and processes responsible for delivering products to customers Supply Chain Management Systems Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications

14 9.14 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Nike

15 9.15 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Nike

16 9.16 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Nike

17 9.17 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Nike’s Supply Chain Figure 9-2 This figure illustrates the major entities in Nike’s supply chain and the flow of information upstream and downstream to coordinate the activities involved in buying, making, and moving a product. Shown here is a simplified supply chain, with the upstream portion focusing only on the suppliers for sneakers and sneaker soles. Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

18 9.18 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Information and supply chain management Inefficiencies cut into a company’s operating costs Can waste up to 25% of operating expenses Just-in-time strategy: Components arrive as they are needed Finished goods shipped after leaving assembly line Safety stock Buffer for lack of flexibility in supply chain Bullwhip effect Information about product demand gets distorted as it passes from one entity to next across supply chain Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

19 9.19 © 2010 by Prentice Hall The Bullwhip Effect Figure 9-3 Inaccurate information can cause minor fluctuations in demand for a product to be amplified as one moves further back in the supply chain. Minor fluctuations in retail sales for a product can create excess inventory for distributors, manufacturers, and suppliers. Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

20 9.20 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 寶僑網站

21 9.21 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 寶鹼網站

22 9.22 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Supply chain management systems Supply chain planning systems Model existing supply chain Demand planning Optimize sourcing, manufacturing plans Establish inventory levels Identifying transportation modes Supply chain execution systems Manage flow of products through distribution centers and warehouses Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

23 9.23 © 2010 by Prentice Hall DP World

24 9.24 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 24 電子資料交換 (Electronic Data Interchange, EDI ) 支援企業間資訊分享及協同合作 – 兩個企業產生交易時,有許多表單文件的資料往來, 不同企業的資料格式、作業制度都不盡相同 – 企業間交易產生資料往來,在彼此的資訊系統、製造系統或 業務系統中,引發一連串的處理作業。 三大功能: – 檔案轉換 ( Mapping ) : 轉換軟體 ( Mapper ) – 標準格式翻譯 ( Translation ) : 翻譯軟體 ( Translator ) – 通訊傳輸 ( Communication ) : 通訊軟體 ( Communicator )

25 9.25 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 25 EDI 基本架構圖

26 9.26 © 2010 by Prentice Hall 動動腦 馬戲團裡的 4 個小丑前 後站成一排, 他們中有 2 人戴紅帽, 2 人戴藍帽, 但小丑並不知自己頭 上帽子的顔色, 也不允 許轉頭向後看. 哪一個小丑最先知道 自己的帽子顔色 ? 注意 : 其他小丑看不見第一個小 丑,因為他身後的海報擋住了 他們的視線.

27 9.27 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Global supply chain issues Global supply chains typically span greater geographic distances and time differences More complex pricing issues (local taxes, transportation, etc.) Foreign government regulations Internet helps companies manage many aspects of global supply chains Sourcing, transportation, communications, international finance Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

28 9.28 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Lativ

29 9.29 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Lativ

30 9.30 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Lativ

31 9.31 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Kellwood

32 9.32 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Demand-driven supply chains Push-based model (build-to-stock) Schedules based on best guesses of demand Pull-based model (demand-driven) Customer orders trigger events in supply chain Sequential supply chains Information and materials flow sequentially from company to company Concurrent supply chains Information flows in many directions simultaneously among members of a supply chain network Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

33 9.33 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Push- Versus Pull-Based Supply Chain Models Figure 9-5 The difference between push- and pull-based models is summarized by the slogan “Make what we sell, not sell what we make.” Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

34 9.34 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Wal-Mart 利用改善庫存和物流 總部 發貨中心 賣場前台 供應商 議價 送貨 上架 賣場倉庫 訂單 送貨 盤點 訂單 總部 發貨中心 賣場 持續補貨 供應商 訂單 售貨交易資訊售貨交易資訊 送貨 連續發貨 上架 發貨指令 議價 傳統大賣場補貨模式

35 9.35 © 2010 by Prentice Hall The Future Internet-Drive Supply Chain Figure 9-6 The future Internet-driven supply chain operates like a digital logistics nervous system. It provides multidirectional communication among firms, networks of firms, and e- marketplaces so that entire networks of supply chain partners can immediately adjust inventories, orders, and capacities. Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

36 9.36 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Match supply to demand Reduce inventory levels Improve delivery service Speed product time to market Use assets more effectively Reduced supply chain costs Increased sales Business Value of Supply Chain Management Systems Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Supply Chain Management Systems

37 9.37 © 2010 by Prentice Hall What is customer relationship management? Knowing the customer In large businesses, too many customers and too many ways customers interact with firm Customer relationship management (CRM) systems Capture and integrate customer data from all over the organization Consolidate and analyze customer data Distribute customer information to various systems and customer touch points across enterprise Provide single enterprise view of customers Customer Relationship Management Systems Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications

38 9.38 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Customer Relationship Management (CRM) Figure 9-7 CRM systems examine customers from a multifaceted perspective. These systems use a set of integrated applications to address all aspects of the customer relationship, including customer service, sales, and marketing. Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Customer Relationship Management Systems

39 9.39 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems CRM software –CRM packages range from niche tools to large-scale enterprise applications –More comprehensive have modules for: Partner relationship management (PRM) –Integrating lead generation, pricing, promotions, order configurations, and availability –Tools to assess partners’ performances Employee relationship management (ERM) –E.g. Setting objectives, employee performance management, performance-based compensation, employee training Customer Relationship Management Systems CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

40 9.40 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems (Partner Relationship Management, PRM) 利用網際網路,有效地管理並傳遞價值給與企業 有合作關係的夥伴廠商。 狹義是指通路合作夥伴 包括配銷商 (Distributor) 、經銷商 (Reseller) 、 加值經銷商 (Value-Added Reseller) 、 系統整合廠商 (Integrator) 及代理商 (Agent) 等 PRM 2012

41 9.41 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems 一. 通路計畫管理 1. 合作夥伴輪廓管理 記錄與儲存所有合作通路夥伴詳細的 Profile 包括專業領域、營業項目、主要產品、 銷售業績、教育訓練需求、所在位址等資訊 2. 合作夥伴生命週期管理 在網路上支援合作通路夥伴的招募 定期追蹤、考核其合作表現的績效 PRM 的主要功能 2012

42 9.42 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems 三. 案源(潛在顧客)管理 四. 銷售生產力工具 透過網際網路的方式提供通路夥伴協助 線上產品、知識及計畫資訊的提供、 銷售技巧訓練、定價 建議書製作 (Proposal) 的協助、 產品組合的設計與檢閱工具的提供、 維修手冊知識的提供等 PRM 的主要功能 2012

43 9.43 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems 五. 需求預測 PRM 根據通路夥伴回饋 需求資訊、銷售數量、案源發生數量的情形、 顧客詢價的資訊、通路存貨的追蹤、 配合各種不同的促 銷、銷售方式, 整合各種來源的資訊作需求預測 PRM 的主要功能 2012

44 9.44 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems 六. 內容管理及出版之個人化 通路夥伴 可快速瀏覽相關文件,即時更新資訊 可自己設定量身訂作所需要的內容 PRM 的主要功能 2012

45 9.45 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems 1. 提升通路夥伴的忠誠度 2. 產生服務差異化的競爭優勢 3. 改善銷售的效能 4. 以自動化來降低通路商的協調與管理成本 5. 創造一個資訊與知識提供及分享的網路論壇 6. 更快速地建立廣度的銷售通路 PRM 的效益 2012

46 9.46 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems CRM packages typically include tools for: –Sales force automation (SFA) E.g. sales prospect and contact information, and sales quote generation capabilities –Customer service E.g. assigning and managing customer service requests; Web-based self-service capabilities –Marketing E.g. capturing prospect and customer data, scheduling and tracking direct-marketing mailings or Customer Relationship Management Systems CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

47 9.47 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Customer Relationship Management Systems HOW CRM SYSTEMS SUPPORT MARKETING Customer relationship management software provides a single point for users to manage and evaluate marketing campaigns across multiple channels, including , direct mail, telephone, the Web, and wireless messages. FIGURE 9-7 CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

48 9.48 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Customer Relationship Management Systems CRM SOFTWARE CAPABILITIES The major CRM software products support business processes in sales, service, and marketing, integrating customer information from many different sources. Included are support for both the operational and analytical aspects of CRM. FIGURE 9-8 CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

49 9.49 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Customer Loyalty Management Process Map Figure 9-10 This process map shows how a best practice for promoting customer loyalty through customer service would be modeled by customer relationship management software. The CRM software helps firms identify high-value customers for preferential treatment. Management Information Systems Chapter 9 Achieving Operational Excellence and Customer Intimacy: Enterprise Applications Customer Relationship Management Systems

50 9.50 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Operational CRM: –Customer-facing applications E.g. sales force automation, call center and customer service support, and marketing automation Analytical CRM: –Analyze customer data output from operational CRM applications –Based on data warehouses populated by operational CRM systems and customer touch points Customer lifetime value (CLTV) Customer Relationship Management Systems CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

51 9.51 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Customer Relationship Management Systems ANALYTICAL CRM DATA WAREHOUSE Analytical CRM uses a customer data warehouse and tools to analyze customer data collected from the firm’s customer touch points and from other sources. FIGURE CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

52 9.52 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Business value of CRM –Increased customer satisfaction –Reduced direct-marketing costs –More effective marketing –Lower costs for customer acquisition/retention –Increased sales revenue –Reduce churn rate Number of customers who stop using or purchasing products or services from a company. Indicator of growth or decline of firm’s customer base Customer Relationship Management Systems CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

53 9.53 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Highly expensive to purchase and implement –$3.5 million to over $12 million Technological changes Business process changes Organizational changes Switching costs, dependence on software vendors Data standardization, management, cleansing Enterprise Applications: New Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

54 9.54 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Next-generation enterprise applications –Move is to make applications more flexible, Web- enabled, integrated with other systems –Enterprise suites Software to enable CRM, SCM, and enterprise systems work together and with suppliers and client systems Utilize Web services, SOA –Open source & on-demand solutions –Mobile compatible; Web 2.0 capabilities –Complementary analytics products Enterprise Applications: New Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

55 9.55 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Read the Interactive Session and discuss the following questions What types of companies are most likely to adopt cloud- based ERP and CRM software services? Why? What companies might not be well-suited for this type of software? What are the advantages and disadvantages of using cloud- based enterprise applications? What management, organization, and technology issues should be addressed in deciding whether to use a conventional ERP or CRM system versus a cloud-based version? Enterprise Applications: New Opportunities and Challenges ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS MOVE TO THE CLOUD CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

56 9.56 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Service platform: –Integrates multiple applications to deliver a seamless experience for all parties E.g. Order-to-cash process –Portal software Used to integrate information from enterprise applications and legacy systems and present it as if coming from a single source Enterprise Applications: New Opportunities and Challenges CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education

57 9.57 © 2010 by Prentice Hall Management Information Systems Enterprise Applications: New Opportunities and Challenges ORDER-TO-CASH SERVICE Order-to-cash is a composite process that integrates data from individual enterprise systems and legacy financial applications. The process must be modeled and translated into a software system using application integration tools. FIGURE 9-11 CHAPTER 9: ACHIEVING OPERATIONAL EXCELLENCE AND CUSTOMER INTIMACY: ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS © Pearson Education


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