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Developing Understanding through Digital Storytelling Jeanette Mikell TECH 345.

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1 Developing Understanding through Digital Storytelling Jeanette Mikell TECH 345

2 What is digital storytelling? Digital storytelling is the practice of combining narrative with digital content, including images, sound, and video, to create a short movie, typically with a strong emotional component (Educause Learning Initiative, 2007). Digital storytelling is the practice of combining narrative with digital content, including images, sound, and video, to create a short movie, typically with a strong emotional component (Educause Learning Initiative, 2007). Dynamic media have become an integral part of youth culture (Bull, 2009). Dynamic media have become an integral part of youth culture (Bull, 2009). Our goal is to understand the characteristics of dynamic media in the context of that culture and learn how to use these media to achieve learning goals in schools (Bull, 2009). Our goal is to understand the characteristics of dynamic media in the context of that culture and learn how to use these media to achieve learning goals in schools (Bull, 2009).

3 What is digital storytelling? Creating a digital story taps skills and talents—in art, media production, storytelling, project development, and so on—that might otherwise lie dormant within many students but that will serve them well in school, at work, and in expressing themselves personally (Ohler, 2005). Creating a digital story taps skills and talents—in art, media production, storytelling, project development, and so on—that might otherwise lie dormant within many students but that will serve them well in school, at work, and in expressing themselves personally (Ohler, 2005). Most importantly, digital storytelling helps students become active participants rather than passive consumers in a society saturated with media (Ohler, 2005). Most importantly, digital storytelling helps students become active participants rather than passive consumers in a society saturated with media (Ohler, 2005).

4 Rationale: Implications for Education For digital storytelling to be an important component of … education, it must provide what other tools lack, including an effective integration of technology with learning, an emotional connection to content, and increased ease of sharing content (Educause Learning Initiative, 2007). For digital storytelling to be an important component of … education, it must provide what other tools lack, including an effective integration of technology with learning, an emotional connection to content, and increased ease of sharing content (Educause Learning Initiative, 2007). Using digital storytelling enhances students' skills in critical thinking, expository writing, and media literacy (Ohler, 2005). Using digital storytelling enhances students' skills in critical thinking, expository writing, and media literacy (Ohler, 2005).

5 Rationale: Implications for Education Dynamic use of digital sound, images, video, and animation can transform a classroom. (Bull, 2009). Dynamic use of digital sound, images, video, and animation can transform a classroom. (Bull, 2009). In studies conducted across several content areas and grade levels, including science, mathematics, and social studies, we have found that effective use of dynamic media can lead to increased student engagement (Bull, 2009). In studies conducted across several content areas and grade levels, including science, mathematics, and social studies, we have found that effective use of dynamic media can lead to increased student engagement (Bull, 2009). Children love to produce, and teaching them the skills to make good productions takes advantage of their interest and provides them with a wealth of skills (O’neal, 2006). Children love to produce, and teaching them the skills to make good productions takes advantage of their interest and provides them with a wealth of skills (O’neal, 2006).

6 The Essential Questions How can the use of digital storytelling and dynamic media promote the development of understanding in the classroom? How can the use of digital storytelling and dynamic media promote the development of understanding in the classroom? How can digital storytelling and dynamic media be integrated into the classroom in order to promote understanding? How can digital storytelling and dynamic media be integrated into the classroom in order to promote understanding? What are some guiding principles for designing learning activities that incorporate dynamic media? What are some guiding principles for designing learning activities that incorporate dynamic media? What tools are available for students and teachers to use in the creation of dynamic media and digital storytelling? What tools are available for students and teachers to use in the creation of dynamic media and digital storytelling?

7 Essential Question: Developing Understanding Research (Royer, 2002) shows… Understanding is a “flexible performance capacity”…the ability to think about the given topic in a flexible manner and to demonstrate that ability through a performance. Understanding is a “flexible performance capacity”…the ability to think about the given topic in a flexible manner and to demonstrate that ability through a performance. Engaging students in developing multimedia projects has the potential to combine constructivist, cooperative, and project-based learning as students develop performances of understanding. Engaging students in developing multimedia projects has the potential to combine constructivist, cooperative, and project-based learning as students develop performances of understanding. When students have to construct or create multimedia, they are actively constructing representations of their own understanding. When students have to construct or create multimedia, they are actively constructing representations of their own understanding.

8 Essential Question: Developing Understanding When kids get to do work that they feel passionate about, kids (and, for that matter, adults) learn more and learn more effectively.—Lawrence Lessig from Remix (Bull, 2009). When kids get to do work that they feel passionate about, kids (and, for that matter, adults) learn more and learn more effectively.—Lawrence Lessig from Remix (Bull, 2009). [Digital Storytelling is] a learning experience supported and extended by the application of technology, that empowers students to create and contribute, all within the context of what they are expected to know and be able to do in the 21st Century (Jakes, n.d.). [Digital Storytelling is] a learning experience supported and extended by the application of technology, that empowers students to create and contribute, all within the context of what they are expected to know and be able to do in the 21st Century (Jakes, n.d.).

9 Classroom Integration Communication with digital images and video is increasingly important (McAnear, 2008). Communication with digital images and video is increasingly important (McAnear, 2008). Students must be able to develop and create digital media, use it to communicate, and understand its effect on themselves and society (McAnear, 2008). Students must be able to develop and create digital media, use it to communicate, and understand its effect on themselves and society (McAnear, 2008). If digital stories are going to survive in education, they need to be tied to the curriculum and used to strengthen students' critical thinking, report writing, and media literacy skills (Ohler, 2005). If digital stories are going to survive in education, they need to be tied to the curriculum and used to strengthen students' critical thinking, report writing, and media literacy skills (Ohler, 2005).

10 Classroom Integration Digital video offers new opportunities for teaching science, social studies, mathematics, and English language arts (Bull, 2009). Digital video offers new opportunities for teaching science, social studies, mathematics, and English language arts (Bull, 2009). DisciplineInstructional Methods Social StudiesInterpreting the record of human endeavors through media ScienceExploring and analyzing natural phenomenon MathematicsInterpreting multiple representations of visual patterns English Language ArtsCommunicating through multiple modes of new literacies

11 Classroom Integration Project based learning (Royer, 2002): Project based learning (Royer, 2002): increased motivation, problem solving ability, collaboration, and resource management increased motivation, problem solving ability, collaboration, and resource management research skills, organization and representation skills, presentation skills, and reflection skills research skills, organization and representation skills, presentation skills, and reflection skills

12 Bloom’s Taxonomy Higher Order Thinking Skills incorporated into digital storytelling (Churches, 2008): Higher Order Thinking Skills incorporated into digital storytelling (Churches, 2008): Creating Creating Evaluating Evaluating Analyzing Analyzing Applying Applying Understanding Understanding

13 Standards Standards Alignment This document from the University of Houston’s Educational Uses of Digital Storytelling outlines how digital storytelling meets nationally accepted standards of learning for technology (ISTE NETS), 21 st Century Learner Outcomes, and English Language Arts. (printed handout available)

14 Standards-21 st Century Skills 21 st Century SkillsDigital Storytelling Digital Age Literacy ICT (Information, Communications and Technology) Literacy Digital storytelling allows a student to be informed and visually literate on numerous levels. Digital storytelling allows students to use technology as a tool to research, organize, evaluate and communicate information. Inventive Thinking Creativity and Innovation Digital storytelling requires creative, independent, and inventive thinking. Effective Communication and CollaborationDigital storytelling involves collaborative, social, interactive, and personal communication. Digital storytelling requires that students assume shared responsibility for collaborative work, and value the individual contributions made by each team member.

15 Standards-21 st Century Skills 21 st Century SkillsDigital Storytelling High Productivity and Accountability Initiative and Self-Direction Digital storytelling utilizes cutting-edge, productivity tools to create high quality products and results. Digital storytelling requires students to prioritize, plan, and manage work to achieve the intended results, and to be accountable for those results. Media LiteracyDigital Storytelling allows students to understand both how and why media messages are constructed, and for what purposes to examine how individuals interpret messages differently, how values and points of view are included or excluded, and how media can influence beliefs and behaviors apply a fundamental understanding of the ethical/legal issues surrounding the access and use of media understand and effectively utilize the most appropriate expressions and interpretations in diverse, multi-cultural environments

16 Standards-NETS NETS for StudentsDigital Storytelling 2a. Students understand the ethical, cultural, and societal issues related to technology. Students will have a clear understanding of copyright issues surrounding the use of images in digital stories. 3a. Students use technology tools to enhance learning, increase productivity, and promote creativity. Students will use Macromedia Flash, Adobe Premiere, Photostory, Movie Maker, Apple iMovie, Adobe Photoshop Elements, Gold Wave, Snagit, and other multimedia software to create digital stories. 3b. Students use productivity tools to collaborate in constructing technology-enhanced models, prepare publications, and produce other creative works. Students will use a storyboard template, Macromedia Flash, Adobe Premiere, Photostory, Movie Maker, Apple iMovie, Adobe Photostory Elements, Gold Wave, SnagIt, and other multimedia software to create digital stories. 4a. Students use telecommunications to collaborate, publish, and interact with peers, experts, and other audiences. Students will use a storyboard template, Macromedia Flash, Adobe Premiere, Photostory, Movie Maker, Apple iMovie, Adobe Photostory Elements, Gold Wave, SnagIt, and other multimedia software to create collaboratively-produced digital stories. 4b. Students use a variety of media and formats to communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences. Students will use Macromedia Flash, Adobe Premiere, Photostory, Movie Maker, Apple iMovie, Adobe Photoshop Elements, Gold Wave, SnagIt, and other multimedia software to create digital stories as personal narratives, as an examination of historical events, and as stories that inform/instruct.

17 Standards-ELA National English Language ArtsDigital Storytelling 1. Students read a wide range of print and non-print texts to build an understanding of texts, of themselves, and of the cultures of the United States and the world; to acquire new information; to respond to the needs and demands of society and the workplace; and for personal fulfillment. Students will watch digital stories produced by other students, teachers, etc., to build an understanding of new information, of society, of cultures, and for personal enjoyment. 4. Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, and vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes. Students will write digital stories as personal narratives, examine historical events, and inform/instruct. 7. Students conduct research on issues and interests by generating ideas and questions, and by posing problems. They gather, evaluate, and synthesize data from a variety of sources (e.g., print and nonprint texts, artifacts and people) to communicate their discoveries in ways that suit their purpose and audience. Students will use Macromedia Flash, Adobe Premiere, Photostory, Movie Maker, Apple iMovie, Adobe Photoshop Elements, Gold Wave, SnagIt, and other multimedia software to create digital stories as personal narratives, examine historical events, and inform/instruct.

18 Standards-ELA National English Language ArtsDigital Storytelling 8. Students use a variety of technological and information resources (e.g., libraries, databases, computer, networks, and video) to gather and synthesize information and to create and communicate knowledge. Student will use Internet Search Tools (e.g., Yahoo Images, Google Images, Ask Pictures, and Picsearch) and Public Domain Websites (e.g., The NYPL Picture Collection Online, Digital History, Picture History) to gather images for the digital stories. 11. Students participate as knowledgeable, reflective, creative and critical members of a variety of literacy communities. Students will use Macromedia Flash, Adobe Premiere, Photostory, Movie Maker, Apple iMovie, Adobe Photoshop Elements, Gold Wave, SnagIt, and other multimedia software to create digital stories that demonstrate new learning through personal narratives, examination of historical events, and stories that inform/instruct. 12. Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information. Students will use Macromedia Flash, Adobe Premiere, Photostory, Movie Maker, Apple iMovie, Adobe Photoshop Elements, Gold Wave, SnagIt, and other multimedia software to create digital stories as personal narratives, examine historical events, and inform/instruct.

19 Content Areas Social Studies Social Studies As students compose a documentary using historical artifacts, they learn the content, develop their research and primary-source analysis skills, and even come to understand the interpretive nature of historical accounts (Hammond, 2009). As students compose a documentary using historical artifacts, they learn the content, develop their research and primary-source analysis skills, and even come to understand the interpretive nature of historical accounts (Hammond, 2009). Science Science Creation of digital movies can facilitate investigation of a science topic using the students’ social context…They can also stage an event for others to collect data, find patterns, and generate predictions (Park, 2009). Creation of digital movies can facilitate investigation of a science topic using the students’ social context…They can also stage an event for others to collect data, find patterns, and generate predictions (Park, 2009).

20 Content Areas Math (Niess, 2009) Math (Niess, 2009) Visualization is an important tool in problem solving, and students need multiple visualization opportunities to fully develop this skill. Watching, analyzing, and creating digital videos provide unique opportunities for guiding this development. Visualization is an important tool in problem solving, and students need multiple visualization opportunities to fully develop this skill. Watching, analyzing, and creating digital videos provide unique opportunities for guiding this development. [Digital storytelling can] move students from a passive mode of watching to active exploration of mathematical ideas. [Digital storytelling can] move students from a passive mode of watching to active exploration of mathematical ideas.

21 Content Areas English Language Arts (Young, 2009) English Language Arts (Young, 2009) Digital video is one particularly dynamic technology with compelling implications for the English language arts classroom. Digital video is one particularly dynamic technology with compelling implications for the English language arts classroom. Students learn best when they use multi- literacies to read and compose in new ways. Students learn best when they use multi- literacies to read and compose in new ways. Integrating visual images with written text, as done in most digital stories and multimodal compositions, enhances and accelerates comprehension. Integrating visual images with written text, as done in most digital stories and multimodal compositions, enhances and accelerates comprehension.

22 Essential Question: Guiding Principles Digital Storytelling activities should (Ohler, 2005): focus on the writing process and the story first and the digital medium later focus on the writing process and the story first and the digital medium later enhance students' skills in critical thinking, expository writing, and media literacy enhance students' skills in critical thinking, expository writing, and media literacy use story mapping and written and oral storytelling before bringing in digital elements. use story mapping and written and oral storytelling before bringing in digital elements.

23 The Process Much of the work required to complete an effective digital storytelling experience can be done in a traditional classroom environment (Jakes, n.d.) Much of the work required to complete an effective digital storytelling experience can be done in a traditional classroom environment (Jakes, n.d.) The following steps are suggested by David Jakes as a guideline for creating digital stories. The following steps are suggested by David Jakes as a guideline for creating digital stories. 1. Writing 2. Script 3. Storyboard 4. Locating Multimedia 5. Creating the digital story 6. Sharing

24 The Process Step 1: Writing Step 1: Writing In most cases, this writing takes the form of a personal narrative about a particular story from a student’s life. In most cases, this writing takes the form of a personal narrative about a particular story from a student’s life. The most effective digital stories have their genesis in sound writing, so it is important to emphasize the value of multiple drafts. The most effective digital stories have their genesis in sound writing, so it is important to emphasize the value of multiple drafts. It is important that the story have a central theme, such as loss or accomplishment, among others. It is important that the story have a central theme, such as loss or accomplishment, among others. Story mapping is useful during this stage…[it] enables teachers to quickly assess the strength of a story while it is still in the planning stage and to challenge students to strengthen weak story elements. Story mapping is useful during this stage…[it] enables teachers to quickly assess the strength of a story while it is still in the planning stage and to challenge students to strengthen weak story elements.

25 The Process Important Story Elements A call to adventure, problem-solution involving transformation, closure (Ohler, 2005) A call to adventure, problem-solution involving transformation, closure (Ohler, 2005) 1 st Person Point of View * 1 st Person Point of View * A dramatic question * A dramatic question * Emotional content * Emotional content * Appropriate voice * Appropriate voice * Soundtrack * Soundtrack * Economy * Economy * Pacing * Pacing * *From Joe Lambert’s Digital Storytelling Cookbook and Glen Bull and Sara Kadjer’s Digital Storytelling in the Classroom (Hodgson, 2005).

26 The Process Step 2: Script Step 2: Script The script is usually a distillation of the essential components of the narrative story. The script is usually a distillation of the essential components of the narrative story. It forms the foundation, and the inclusion of the various multimedia elements serve to rebuild the story. It forms the foundation, and the inclusion of the various multimedia elements serve to rebuild the story. Producing the digital story from the script ensures that the multimedia elements convey and contribute meaning to the story, rather than being included to make the story more “interesting.” Producing the digital story from the script ensures that the multimedia elements convey and contribute meaning to the story, rather than being included to make the story more “interesting.”

27 The Process Step 3: Storyboard Step 3: Storyboard Organizes the flow of their movie. Organizes the flow of their movie. Includes a place for the student to associate their script with a visual (still frame or video). Includes a place for the student to associate their script with a visual (still frame or video). The storyboarding process permits students to determine or draw the type of imagery that will be associated with a particular portion of the script. The storyboarding process permits students to determine or draw the type of imagery that will be associated with a particular portion of the script.

28 The Process Step 4: Locating Multimedia Step 4: Locating Multimedia Students use search tools …to locate still- frame imagery or video. Students use search tools …to locate still- frame imagery or video. Students may also scan images from photographs from personal collections at this point. Students may also scan images from photographs from personal collections at this point. Students can create very compelling stories by using still frame imagery. Students can create very compelling stories by using still frame imagery.

29 The Process Step 5: Creating the digital story Step 5: Creating the digital story Students create their story using the software available to them-iMovie, Windows Movie Maker or Photo Story Students create their story using the software available to them-iMovie, Windows Movie Maker or Photo Story The most difficult component is recording the voice (called the voiceover) from the script. The most difficult component is recording the voice (called the voiceover) from the script. Once the components of the digital story are assembled, students then produce the final movie, a process called rendering. Once the components of the digital story are assembled, students then produce the final movie, a process called rendering.

30 The Process Step 6: Share Step 6: Share Students are generally intensely proud of their creations. Students are generally intensely proud of their creations. Showing the digital stories help students understand each other as human beings, and it helps kids to understand that they all share common experiences, and that the person with the blue hair across the room is not that different from them. Showing the digital stories help students understand each other as human beings, and it helps kids to understand that they all share common experiences, and that the person with the blue hair across the room is not that different from them. Additionally, students have the opportunity to share their stories with a global audience. Additionally, students have the opportunity to share their stories with a global audience. Unless otherwise noted, all steps are from Capturing Stories, Capturing Lives: an Introduction to Digital Storytelling by David Jakes.

31 Suggested Evaluation for a Digital Story

32

33 Essential Question: Available Tools Software Software Story Creation Story Creation Windows Movie Maker (PC) Windows Movie Maker (PC) Photo Story Photo Story iMovie (MAC) iMovie (MAC) Image Editing Image Editing PhotoShop PhotoShop Google Picasa Google Picasa Audio Editing Audio Editing Audacity Audacity Adobe Audition 2.0 Adobe Audition 2.0

34 Essential Question: Available Tools Story Playback Story Playback Windows Media Player Windows Media Player Real Player Real Player Quick Time Quick Time Hardware Hardware Computer Computer Scanner Scanner Digital Camera Digital Camera Video Camera Video Camera Microphone Microphone

35 Web 2.0 and Digital Storytelling The transformation from analog to digital formats-- made Web 2.0, social media, and many other unanticipated consequences possible (Bull, 2009). The transformation from analog to digital formats-- made Web 2.0, social media, and many other unanticipated consequences possible (Bull, 2009). Wikipedeia offers a concise definition of Web 2.0 as: “applications that facilitate participatory information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design, and collaboration on the World Wide Web.” Wikipedeia offers a concise definition of Web 2.0 as: “applications that facilitate participatory information sharing, interoperability, user-centered design, and collaboration on the World Wide Web.” Web 2.0 has given birth to a new participatory culture which allows participants to engage in real- time collaboration and to co-construct solutions to problems (McAnear, 2008). Web 2.0 has given birth to a new participatory culture which allows participants to engage in real- time collaboration and to co-construct solutions to problems (McAnear, 2008).

36 Web 2.0 for Digital Storytelling Collaborative Opportunities Collaborative Opportunities Blogs Blogs Wikis Wikis Video Sharing Video Sharing YouTube YouTube SchoolTube SchoolTube TeacherTube TeacherTube Social Networking Social Networking Twitter Twitter Facebook Facebook

37 A Web 2.0 Example: Voice Thread Voice Thread offers the capability of video sharing, as well as audio files, images, and text documents and the opportunity to hold collaborative conversations around these files. Voice Thread offers the capability of video sharing, as well as audio files, images, and text documents and the opportunity to hold collaborative conversations around these files. Participants comment in one of five ways: text, microphone, telephone, webcam, or audio file upload. Participants comment in one of five ways: text, microphone, telephone, webcam, or audio file upload. Students upload their digital stories to share with classmates, friends, family, and invite comments and discussion. Students upload their digital stories to share with classmates, friends, family, and invite comments and discussion. A unique interactive opportunity A unique interactive opportunity

38 A Library Example Library Information Science Essential Questions Library Information Science Essential Questions Why is it important to have a place (the library) where knowledge and information is readily available and shared freely? Why is it important to have a place (the library) where knowledge and information is readily available and shared freely? Why is it necessary to have organization in the library? Why is it necessary to have organization in the library? How is the library organized? How is the library organized? How are the books I read connected to my real life experiences? How are the books I read connected to my real life experiences? How can knowing how to locate information be beneficial to me? How can knowing how to locate information be beneficial to me? How can technology be used to locate information, to help me to learn, and to help me to share what I have learned? How can technology be used to locate information, to help me to learn, and to help me to share what I have learned? How can I use the information that I find or create responsibly and ethically? How can I use the information that I find or create responsibly and ethically?

39 How are the books I read connected to my real life experiences?

40 North Myrtle Beach Elementary Student Population 700 students 700 students Ethnic Makeup Ethnic Makeup Caucasian: 61% Caucasian: 61% African-American: 32% African-American: 32% Hispanic: 7% Hispanic: 7% Special Populations Special Populations Free/Reduced Lunch: 68% Free/Reduced Lunch: 68% Gifted and Talented: 11.5% Gifted and Talented: 11.5% Resource, Special Needs, or Speech: 13% Resource, Special Needs, or Speech: 13% Self-Contained: 3% Self-Contained: 3% ESOL/ELL: 6% ESOL/ELL: 6%

41 NMBE-Classroom Curriculum English Language Arts (as related to digital storytelling) Second and Third Grade: Students will write for a variety of purposes, including personal narratives, descriptive compositions, and pieces to entertain others.

42 NMBE-Classroom Curriculum Science Second Grade: Second Grade: Scientific inquiry Scientific inquiry Animals Animals Weather Weather Properties and changes in matter Properties and changes in matter Magnetism Magnetism Third Grade Third Grade Scientific inquiry Scientific inquiry Habitats and adaptations Habitats and adaptations Earth’s materials and changes Earth’s materials and changes Heat and changes in matter Heat and changes in matter Motion and Sound Motion and Sound

43 NMBE-Classroom Curriculum Social Studies Second Grade Second Grade Communities Here and Across the World Communities Here and Across the World Cultural contributions of various peoples in various regions, local community, local government, geographic and political divisions Cultural contributions of various peoples in various regions, local community, local government, geographic and political divisions Third Grade Third Grade South Carolina Studies South Carolina Studies Places, regions, and human systems, exploration and settlement of South Carolina, South Carolina’s role in the American Revolution and the American Civil War, Major 19 th and 20 th century developments in South Carolina Places, regions, and human systems, exploration and settlement of South Carolina, South Carolina’s role in the American Revolution and the American Civil War, Major 19 th and 20 th century developments in South Carolina

44 NMBE-Classroom Curriculum Math Mathematical Processes Mathematical Processes Second and Third: Problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connection, representations Second and Third: Problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connection, representations Number and operations Number and operations Second Grade: Base-ten, place value, addition, and subtraction Second Grade: Base-ten, place value, addition, and subtraction Third Grade: Whole numbers, fractions, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division Third Grade: Whole numbers, fractions, addition, subtraction, multiplication and division Algebra Algebra Second Grade: Numeric patterns, qualitative and quantitative change Second Grade: Numeric patterns, qualitative and quantitative change Third Grade: Numeric patterns, symbols as representations Third Grade: Numeric patterns, symbols as representations

45 NMBE-Classroom Curriculum Geometry Geometry Second and Third: Spatial reasoning, basic attributes and classification of three-dimensional shapes. Second and Third: Spatial reasoning, basic attributes and classification of three-dimensional shapes. Measurement Measurement Second Grade: Money, length, weight, time, and temperature Second Grade: Money, length, weight, time, and temperature Third Grade: Money, length, time, weight, liquid volume, polygons Third Grade: Money, length, time, weight, liquid volume, polygons Data Analysis and Probability Data Analysis and Probability Second Grade: Collecting and organizing data, trends in a data set, predictions based on data Second Grade: Collecting and organizing data, trends in a data set, predictions based on data Third Grade: Organizing, interpreting, analyzing, and making predictions about data, multiple representations, basic probability Third Grade: Organizing, interpreting, analyzing, and making predictions about data, multiple representations, basic probability

46 North Myrtle Beach Elementary Performance Data Sources: NMBE School Summary Report mary%20Report% %20Final.pdf mary%20Report% %20Final.pdf NMBE 2010 SC Annual School Report Card Summary Horry County Schools Performance Goals NMBE Assessment Results Grade 3 - ELA 85.1% of students will score MET and EXEMPLARY; 68.3% of students will score EXEMPLARY In third grade ELA, 82.80% of our students scored MET and EXEMPLARY; 68% EXEMPLARY, 16.1% MET Grade 3 - MATH 79.2% of students will score MET and EXEMPLARY; 53.0% of students will score EXEMPLARY In third grade MATH, 77.60% of our students scored MET and EXEMPLARY; 50.4% EXEMPLARY, 29.4% MET Grade 3 - SOCIAL STUDIES 81.0% of students will score MET and EXEMPLARY; 44.3% of students will score EXEMPLARY In third grade SOCIAL STUDIES, 72.5% of our students scored MET and EXEMPLARY; 41.5% EXEMPLARY, 35.2% MET Grade 3 - SCIENCE 65.4% of students will score MET and EXEMPLARY; 29.8% of students will score EXEMPLARY In third grade SCIENCE, 70.1% of our students scored MET and EXEMPLARY; 35.7% EXEMPLARY, 36.3% MET

47 North Myrtle Beach Elementary Available Tools for Digital Storytelling 2 Computer Labs 2 Computer Labs 2 Mini Laptop Computer Carts 2 Mini Laptop Computer Carts 5-6 Classroom Computers in each classroom 5-6 Classroom Computers in each classroom Windows Movie Maker Windows Movie Maker Library/Computer Lab Scanners Library/Computer Lab Scanners Flip Cam Flip Cam Digital Camera Digital Camera Webcam Webcam

48 North Myrtle Beach Elementary The Essential Questions Will digital storytelling improve content understanding in any or all of our student populations at NMBE? Will digital storytelling improve content understanding in any or all of our student populations at NMBE? Can the incorporation of digital storytelling into our classroom instruction propel more of our students to the MET and EXEMPLARY categories on PASS testing? Can the incorporation of digital storytelling into our classroom instruction propel more of our students to the MET and EXEMPLARY categories on PASS testing? They are both essential questions worth exploring. They are both essential questions worth exploring.

49 Important Terms Dynamic Media Any digital form of media-text, images, audio, or video that has the ability to be revised, re-edited, remixed, and easily posted, uploaded, downloaded, or otherwise shared electronically. Any digital form of media-text, images, audio, or video that has the ability to be revised, re-edited, remixed, and easily posted, uploaded, downloaded, or otherwise shared electronically. The Mash-Up: gital-remix-mash-up-culture-explained.html The Mash-Up: gital-remix-mash-up-culture-explained.html gital-remix-mash-up-culture-explained.html gital-remix-mash-up-culture-explained.html Photo/Video Management and Sharing Photo/Video Management and Sharing Flickr: Flickr:

50 Important Terms Essential Questions The starting point, as Grant Wiggins argues, is to "organize courses not around 'answers' but around questions and problems to which 'content' represents answers." Such "essential questions," as they are known, are an important ingredient of curriculum reform The starting point, as Grant Wiggins argues, is to "organize courses not around 'answers' but around questions and problems to which 'content' represents answers." Such "essential questions," as they are known, are an important ingredient of curriculum reform A question which requires the student to develop a plan or course of action. A question which requires the student to develop a plan or course of action. A question that requires the student to make a decision. A question that requires the student to make a decision. Is it acceptable to clone human beings? Support your decision (Decision making) Is it acceptable to clone human beings? Support your decision (Decision making) What’s the best plan for losing 20 pounds? Your plan can include three strategies that are most appropriate for you. (Action plan) (Jakes, n.d.). What’s the best plan for losing 20 pounds? Your plan can include three strategies that are most appropriate for you. (Action plan) (Jakes, n.d.).

51 Important Terms Digital Storytelling Digital storytelling is the practice of combining narrative with digital content, including images, sound, and video, to create a short movie, typically with a strong emotional component (Educause Learning Initiative, 2007). Digital storytelling is the practice of combining narrative with digital content, including images, sound, and video, to create a short movie, typically with a strong emotional component (Educause Learning Initiative, 2007). A Memoir: My Granny g/specialmemories_t1.mov A Memoir: My Granny g/specialmemories_t1.mov g/specialmemories_t1.mov g/specialmemories_t1.mov Favorite Holidays g/sapp_2003_t1.mov Favorite Holidays g/sapp_2003_t1.mov g/sapp_2003_t1.mov g/sapp_2003_t1.mov

52 Sources Bull, G. & Bell, L. (2009). Lights, camera, learning! Learning and Bull, G. & Bell, L. (2009). Lights, camera, learning! Learning and Leading with Technology, 36(8) Retrieved from camera_learning_lltech_2009_jun-jul_p30.pdf Bull, G. & Garofalo, J. (2009). Dynamic media. Learning and Leading Bull, G. & Garofalo, J. (2009). Dynamic media. Learning and Leading with Technology. 36(5) Retrieved from media.pdf Churches, A. (2008). Bloom’s taxonomy blooms digitally. Tech & Churches, A. (2008). Bloom’s taxonomy blooms digitally. Tech & Learning. Retrieved from Cushman, K. (1989). Asking the essential questions: curriculum Cushman, K. (1989). Asking the essential questions: curriculum development. Horace, 5(5). Retrieved from

53 Sources Educause Learning Initiative. (2007). Seven things you should know Educause Learning Initiative. (2007). Seven things you should know about digital storytelling. Retrieved from Hammond, T.C., & Lee, J. (2009). From watching newsreels to Hammond, T.C., & Lee, J. (2009). From watching newsreels to making videos. Learning and Leading with Technology, 36(1) Retrieved from _watching_newsreels_to_making_videos.pdf Hodgson, K. (2005). What is digital storytelling? Retrieved from Hodgson, K. (2005). What is digital storytelling? Retrieved from 20Storytelling%20Main%20Page.htm Jakes, D. (n.d.). Basing learning experiences in essential questions. Jakes, D. (n.d.). Basing learning experiences in essential questions. Retrieved from ences-in-Essential-QuestionsDavid-Jakes-It

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