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Lesson #7 Topic: Teacher: Grade: Date: Period(s): Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Relationship to Current Content in Regular Classroom: (*) indicates an accommodation.

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson #7 Topic: Teacher: Grade: Date: Period(s): Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Relationship to Current Content in Regular Classroom: (*) indicates an accommodation."— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson #7 Topic: Teacher: Grade: Date: Period(s): Bloom’s Taxonomy Level: Relationship to Current Content in Regular Classroom: (*) indicates an accommodation or modification

2 Learning Target I can predict the world view of one author by reading his or her work of fiction.

3 AASL/ Common Core Crosswalk 1.1.2 Use prior and background knowledge as context for new learning. 1.1.7 Make sense of information gathered from diverse sources by identifying misconceptions, main and supporting ideas, conflicting information, and point of view or bias. CC.11-12.L.6 Vocabulary Acquisition and Use: Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level; demonstrate independence in gathering vocabulary knowledge when considering a word or phrase important to comprehension or expression. CC.9-10.SL.3 Comprehension and Collaboration: Evaluate a speaker’s point of view, reasoning, and use of evidence and rhetoric, identifying any fallacious reasoning or exaggerated or distorted evidence.

4 Vocabulary World view Fiction Nonfiction Author Point of view

5 Agenda 1.Develop the concepts of fiction, nonfiction, and authors. 2.Explain how imaginative works of literature are not completely imaginative, as authors derive at least some of their imaginative ideas from the world around them, be it language, religion, history, politics, mental health (or not!), geography, science, or culture. Thus, a person who grew up in a war-torn country would write about something different than a spoiled rich rock star. People tend to write about what they know. 3.People have opinions and world views, even when they say they don’t. If they had no world views to share, they wouldn’t be writing in the first place. 4.Reading an author’s biography may provide insight into why a person’s world view is as it is. 5.As an emerging adult, you are developing your own world view. From that world view, you will live your life and make multiple decisions. Reading allows you to transcend time, place, social class, race, and many other limitations in your life to experience what others have experienced. Fiction isn’t just for fun; it’s a way to explore life as other people have lived it. Who knows? You may agree with the way they lived, and live that way yourself. 6.Sit back and enjoy as I introduce you to a few of the interesting novels—and world views—that I have experienced recently. (See slides at end of lesson for sample book talk. *Visual demonstrations *seating to reduce distractions

6 Rubric Noteworthy Located a fiction book independently for personal reading and checked it out. Noted evidence of the author’s world view after reading the first chapter. Developing Located a fiction book (with librarian assistance) for personal reading and checked it out. Noted evidence of the author’s world view after reading the first chapter. Acceptable Located a fiction book (with peer assistance) for personal reading and checked it out. Noted evidence of the author’s world view after reading the first chapter. Not Ready Failed to check out a book Failed to note evidence of the author’s world view after reading the first chapter.

7 Time for Browsing, Silent Reading, nd Book Checkout *Use of lexile numbers to select books @ www.lexile.com www.lexile.com *Seating to reduce distractions *Clearly defined limits

8 Exit Ticket What is the title of the book that you began to read? Who is the author? What do you know about the author’s life experiences and world view? What does the first chapter of the book tell you about the author’s world view so far?

9 The following slides may be of use for this lesson.

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11 Candide Written by the French author Voltaire nearly 250 years ago, this is a book still worth reading. Candide has everything go wrong with his life, starting with being kidnapped and forced to fight in the army and ending up travelling with a woman who lost one of her buttocks. (Read the book to find out how—I won’t tell you.) Candide, despite all of the horrible—and even ridiculous– things that happen, is determined to remain positive and find the goodness in life. In a really surprising ending, he meets a farmer who actually has the answer. And, surprisingly, I agreed with the answer. Will you?

12 The Kite Runner Amir lives in Afghanistan just before the first Afghanistan war, in which Russia falsely promised to bring peace and prosperity to the country. A large part of the story describes Amir’s childhood and his relationship to his faithful, loyal, boyhood friend. There are great memories of the annual kite contests, and one year, Amir’s kite stays in the air the longest, giving him the win—but at a horrible loss to his best friend. His best friend dies, while Amir goes to America to live a life free from war. But Amir’s guilt does not subside, which leads him back to war-torn Afghanistan to rescue his best friend’s son from a desolate orphanage.

13 The Art of Dancing in the Rain This story is told by a dog, whose name is Enzo. He tells the story of his master, Denny, who is a race car driver wannabee. Denny is happily married and has a daughter, Zoe. To get started in racing, Denny travels a lot, leaving his family behind. Unfortunately, Denny’s wife dies of cancer, leaving Zoe’s grandparents to care for her while her father goes racing. Over time, the grandparents become attached to Zoe, and want to adopt her permanently. Denny, of course, does not want to see that happen. But on one cold, snowy night, Denny agrees to take a 15- year-old relative home, and the evil begins. Will Denny go to jail? Will he ever see his daughter again?

14 Of Mice and Men In 1930’s America, the Great Depression was in full force, and jobs were scarce. Men literally left home on foot, seeking out whatever work they could find. Enter George. Not only was he out of work, but he had a mentally handicapped relative named Lennie, whom he refused to leave behind. As you might imagine, it wasn’t easy getting work on California ranches with Lennie following behind. Nonetheless, George and Lennie got work on ranches, and the hope remained that one day George and Lennie would save up enough money to buy an acre of land and a shack to live in. That dream is shattered one night, when Lennie corners a girl and all the ranch hands are out to track down Lennie and turn him over to the law. How can George protect Lennie now? And does he?

15 The Great Gatsby A new neighbor—Jay Gatsby-moves into the most luxurious mansion in town, and there are wonderful parties almost every night. Gatsby, however, is a mystery man. Who is he? Where did he come from? How did he get his money? And then, one night, it happens. Jay Gatsby becomes a criminal and a pitiful person. The mansion is left in ruins…

16 Gladly the Cross-Eyed Bear There’ s trouble in the toy industry, as Etta and Brett fight Lainie over who invented a cross-eyed bear that is sure to become a real money-maker at Christmas time. The fight ends up in court, of course, but then something strange happens. Brett invites Lainie to his private yacht to discuss an out-of-court settlement, and a reasonable deal is struck. But the next morning, Brett is found dead on his boat, and Lainie is the main suspect. Enter Matthew Hope, a private detective, who has to find the real killer. Like all Ed McBain mysteries, the identity of the real killer is a real shock.

17 The Last Chance Texaco by Brent Hartinger Lucy Pitt, age 15, hasn’t exactly had a charmed life. She has been in foster homes since her parents were killed in a car accident when she was seven. She encountered trouble in every foster home, and now she has one last chance at a group home—with other kids who are also on their last chance. Surprisingly, things go reasonably well here—until a series of car bombings, for which the residents of the group home as accused.

18 The Survivor by Tim Champlin Marcel Dupre was bored, so he joined the French Foreign Legion, looking for adventure. But he had not anticipated the brutal treatment that the soldiers received, and he ran away, only to be caught and put in a brutal French prison camp in Guiana. He was there for 20 years. In those 20 years, he tried to escape 7 times, was caught, and was severely punished. On the eighth escape attempt, he was successful and eventually came to San Francisco with his journal about the evils of the French Foreign legion, which he intended to publish. But Marcel Dupre arrives in America just as the French ambassador is visiting the United States. Suddenly, the French government is after the journal so that France is not embarrased. The U.S. government is after the journal because America does not want to embarrass France during this visit. And then there’s Jay McGraw, who works for the security firm of Wells Fargo. Jay’s company wants him to get the manuscript and bring it safely back to Wells Fargo headquarters, proving that Wells Fargo can keep anything safe from theft. Marcel Dupre has escaped from one of the worst prison camps ever, but can he survive three groups of people who will all kill for what he knows about that prison camp? This is a cowboy story like none you’ve ever experienced.

19 Make the Effort—Read. Reading requires time. Reading requires effort. Reading requires commitment. Reading requires discernment. Will you believe what others tell you— Or will you read and make up your own mind?

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