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Apprenticing Adolescents Into The Language Of Our Discipline Academic Language and the Common Core EngageNY.org.

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Presentation on theme: "Apprenticing Adolescents Into The Language Of Our Discipline Academic Language and the Common Core EngageNY.org."— Presentation transcript:

1 Apprenticing Adolescents Into The Language Of Our Discipline Academic Language and the Common Core EngageNY.org

2 Purpose of this Session “I realized I needed to stop telling students the meaning of important words and ideas in my English class. And, academic language, for us, hasn’t been about looking up unknown vocabulary or me telling students how to understand the text. To me, it became a way of guiding students towards a critical understanding of how language is used in texts and then helping them mimic what authors do—use intentional language to convey powerful ideas.” Sarah 10 th Grade English Teacher EngageNY.org2

3 Purpose of this Session Participants will be able to: Identify the academic language demands of the NY 9-12 ELA curriculum modules. Determine which academic language to scaffold for students. Identify and design teaching practices that support adolescent ownership of academic language. EngageNY.org3

4 Agenda for this Session EngageNY.org4 TopicTime Academic language and Module Minutes Identifying the words to teach35 minutes Analyzing a lesson/deepening vocabulary instruction 35 minutes Reflection and Closing5 minutes

5 Academic Language Knowledge of the language of a discipline is necessary for student success in a subject. Words work differently in different disciplines (e.g., “function,”) Each discipline has their own set of words to represent their valued concepts and literacy processes. EngageNY.org Antonacci & O’ Callaghan (2011) 5

6 Module 11.1: O What a Noble Mind is Here O’erthrown!” Unit 1 “My Last Duchess” by Robert Browning (6 Lessons) Unit 2 Hamlet by William Shakespeare (24 Lessons) Unit 3 “A Room of One’s Own” by Virginia Woolf (9 Lessons) Key skills: reading closely, learning vocabulary through context, annotating, using evidence in writing and discussion. Introduces students to literary and nonfictions texts Provides students opportunities to practice independent writing assessments EngageNY.org 6

7 Focus on Knowledge of Language EngageNY.org7 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L  Apply knowledge of language to understand how language functions in different contexts, to make effective choices for meaning or style, and to comprehend more fully when reading or listening.

8 Focus on Vocabulary Acquisition and Use EngageNY.org8 CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L  Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases based on grades 11–12 reading and content, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L  Demonstrate understanding of figurative language, word relationships, and nuances in word meanings. CCSS.ELA-Literacy.L  Acquire and use accurately general academic and domain-specific words and phrases, sufficient for reading, writing, speaking, and listening at the college and career readiness level.

9 How to Build Academic Language Make It Intentional  Select high-leverage, meaningful vocabulary for explicit, student-centered, instruction. Make It Transparent  Make vocabulary instruction explicit through effective questioning, modeling, and instruction that builds understanding of the word AND the text. Make It Useable  Provide regular opportunities for students to practice with high-leverage vocabulary in writing tasks and in discussion about text. Make It Personal  Provide a volume, and variety of independent reading that includes both fiction and non-fiction texts. EngageNY.org (adapted from Fisher, 2008) 9

10 MAKING IT INTENTIONAL: IDENTIFYING THE WORDS TO TEACH EngageNY.org10

11 Two Aspects of Vocabulary Context  Words students can figure out from content  Words for which the definition needs to be provided Amount of Instructional Time  Words that need more time: abstract, have multiple meanings, and/or are a part of a word family  Words that need less time: concrete or describe events/processes/ideas/concepts/experiences that are familiar to students EngageNY.org 11

12 “My Last Duchess” (Sample) EngageNY.org12 These words merit less time and attention These words merit more time and attention Meaning Can be Determined from Context dowry terrace design lessoned object Meaning Needs to Be Provided forsooth munificence warrant

13 Misconception Alert! EngageNY.org13 License to ignore some words doesn’t mean ignore ALL words. Select words critical to understanding the text. Select words critical to the disciplinary thinking we do with text. Spending time on words doesn’t mean copying dictionary definitions Commit to text-based word work

14 Try This: Text Analysis Vocabulary Analysis of A Room of One’s Own  Read the excerpt.  Annotate for vocabulary words potentially challenging to your students.  Share your list with a partner.  In pairs, prioritize your words by placing your annotated words on the blank Academic Vocabulary Quadrant Chart. EngageNY.org14

15 MAKING IT TRANSPARENT AND USEFUL: ANALYZING A LESSON EngageNY.org15

16 How to Build Academic Language  Make it Intentional Select high-leverage, meaningful vocabulary for explicit, yet student-centered, instruction  Make it Transparent Make vocabulary instruction explicit through effective questioning, modeling, and instruction that builds understanding of the word AND the text.  Make it Useable Provide regular opportunities for students to practice with high-leverage vocabulary in writing tasks and in discussion about text.  Make It Personal Provide a volume, and variety of independent reading that includes both fiction and non-fiction texts. EngageNY.org (adapted from Fisher, 2008) 16

17 Transparent Approaches Effective questioning of the language in the text: Open-ended Text-dependent Analyzes word relationships Explicit modeling of textual analysis. M ISCONCEPTION A LERTS : Questioning and modeling aren’t “transmitting.” Students must do the work of learning. (Marzano & Pickering 2005; Nagy, 1989; Nagy & Scott, 2000; Paribakht & Wesche, 1997) EngageNY.org17

18 Useable Approaches Using high-leverage vocabulary in writing tasks  Quick write prompts, collaborative writing tasks, assessments Use high-leverage vocabulary in discussion tasks Discuss language use M ISCONCEPTION A LERTS : Writing and talking about vocabulary does not mean writing and reciting definitions. Use vocabulary to think, write, and talk about the text. EngageNY.org18

19 Try This: Looking at Instruction Look at the sample lesson Lesson 1 in your packet. Read the lesson, looking for examples of transparent and useful practices. Talk with a partner:  What did you notice about the intentional selection of high-leverage vocabulary?  How was instruction transparent using questioning and modeling to support students?  How was writing and discussion used to provide students with opportunities to use high-leverage vocabulary? EngageNY.org19

20 Try This: Adapting Curriculum Work with a partner to design additional vocabulary learning for this excerpt. Make it Intentional: What other high-leverage, meaningful vocabulary could be selected for explicit, student-centered instruction? Make it Transparent: How else could you use effective questioning and modeling to build understanding of the word AND the text? Make it Useable: How else could you provide opportunities for students to practice with new vocabulary in writing tasks and in discussion about text? EngageNY.org 20

21 MAKING IT PERSONAL: SUPPORTING A VOLUME OF INDEPENDENT READING EngageNY.org21

22 Personal Approaches: Accountable Independent Reading Build a volume of reading  Fiction and non-fiction, variety of self-selected texts Create a culture of independent reading  Low impact, accountable, routine M ISCONCEPTION A LERT : Independent doesn’t mean unaccountable. Have students discuss texts with the CCSS. EngageNY.org22

23 Reflection and Closing How will you use these materials to support student academic language development? What actions should you take or not take to support your students’ academic language in high school ELA classrooms? EngageNY.org 23

24 References Anderson, R. C. & Nagy, W. E. (1991).Word meanings. In R. Barr, M. L. Kamil, P. B. Mosenthal, & P. D. Pearson (Eds.), Handbook of reading research (Vol. 2, pp. 690–724). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Antonacci, P. A. & O’ Callaghan, C. M. (2011). Developing Content Area Literacy: 40 Strategies for Middle and Secondary Classrooms. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. Armbruster, B. B. (1992). Vocabulary in content area lessons. The Reading Teacher, 45(7), 550–551. Beck, I.L., McKeown, M.G. & Kucan, L. (2002). Bringing Words to Life: Robust Vocabulary Instruction. New York: The Guilford Press. Marzano, R.J., & Pickering. D.J. (2005). Building Academic Vocabulary: Teacher’s Manual. Alexandria, VA: ASCD. Nagy, W. E. (1988). Teaching vocabulary to improve comprehension. Newark, DE: International Reading Association. Nagy,W. E., & Scott, J. A. (2000). Vocabulary processes. In M. Kamil, P. B. Mosenthal, P. D. Pearson, & R. Barr (Eds.), Handbook of reading research (Vol. 3, pp. 269–284). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum. Stahl, S.A. (1998). Vocabulary Development. Cambridge, MA: Brookline. EngageNY.org 24

25 CONFIDENTIAL – DO NOT CIRCULATE EngageNY.org Online Parking Lot Please go to institute-materials-february and select “Online Parking Lot” for any NYSED related questions. institute-materials-february Thank You!

26 CONFIDENTIAL – DO NOT CIRCULATE EngageNY.org26 Plus/Deltas Please go to team-institute-materials-february and fill out the Plus/Delta for today’s session. team-institute-materials-february Thank You!


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