Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act Susannah Wayland, Homeless Coordinator.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act Susannah Wayland, Homeless Coordinator."— Presentation transcript:

1 McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act Susannah Wayland, Homeless Coordinator

2 SusannahWayland Homeless Coordinator (614)

3 Right to a Free Public Education

4 McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act

5 Who is homeless? Individual who lacks a fixed, regular and adequate nighttime residence Includes children and youth

6 Who is homeless? Sharing housing Living in motels, hotels, trailer parks Living in emergency or transitional housing Abandoned in hospitals

7 How many students are homeless?

8 23,748

9

10 Where are they living?

11

12 Doubled Up Quiz

13 Quiz Which of the following are included in the definition of doubled-up? Sharing the housing of other persons due to: Relocation Economic hardship Job loss Loss of housing Bankruptcy

14 Reauthorizes the McKinney Act (1987) Requires educational access Provides states with funding McKinney-Vento Act

15 Liaison collaboration between social service agencies and school districts Restriction of the segregation of homeless students McKinney-Vento Act

16 Immediately enroll students experiencing homelessness.

17 Proof of residency Guardianship Birth certificates, school records Enroll Even WhenLacking Records

18 Enroll Even WhenLacking Records Birth certificates, school records Medical records, including immunization Required dress code items, including uniforms

19 Enrollment

20 District Responsibilities Remove barriers to enrolling homeless students Make school records available in a timely manner

21 District Responsibilities Provide comparable and coordinated services Ensure that homeless students are not segregated in separate schools or programs

22 District Liaison Responsibilities

23 Assist homeless studentswith immediate enrollment and attendanceto school

24 Promote School and Community Awareness Training to school personnel Disseminate public notices of rights Coordinate with shelters, hotels, homeless serving agencies

25 Ensure Identification

26 DataCollection Collect information on homeless children and youth, including their places of residence Include homeless students in statewide assessments

27 DataCollection Method to collect local data and submit to state EMIS

28 Transportation

29 Share responsibility Provide comparable service Make arrangements Coordinate with transportation directors

30 Ohio School Boards Association (614)

31 Dispute Resolution

32 Title I Part A Set Aside CCIP Note # 78: June 29, 2006 Funds to provide services to homeless children who are not attending a participating Title I school

33 Serving Homeless Children and Youth Under Title I, Part A A district may also use Title I, Part A funds to provide: Educationally related services to homeless children and youth in shelters and other locations where they may live.

34 Serving Homeless Children and Youth Under Title I, Part A Services that may not ordinarily be provided to other students, for example: Items of clothing, particularly if necessary to meet a school’s dress or uniform requirement Clothing and shoes necessary to participate in physical education classes.

35 Serving Homeless Children and Youth Under title I, Part A Examples: Student fees that are necessary to participate in the general education program Personal school supplies such as backpacks and notebooks. Birth certificates necessary to enroll Immunizations Other examples listed in G-11 of Title I Use of Funds

36 New Authority

37 The 2014 appropriations act expands the use of Title I funds to support homeless children and youth for the following requirements under McKinney-Vento: Local homeless liaisons Transportation to and from the school of origin.

38 Unaccompanied Immigrant Children

39 Program Audit and Compliance Tracking System Self evaluation Telephone survey On-site review

40 Tips for Identifying Homeless Children and Youth

41 Know your community “network”

42 Train School Enrollment Personnel to: Look for signs Offer assistance Contact you

43 Possible Signs of Homelessness Attendance at several schools More than one family at the same address Attention-seeking behavior

44 Possible Signs of Homelessness Hunger and hoarding of food Poor hygiene and grooming Sleeping in class

45 Homeless: Yes or No? Justin was living with his mom and stepdad, but ran away when his stepdad started getting rough with him out of the house. He is now staying with a friend while things cool off, but can only stay there for a month.

46 Due to Loss of Housing Did the family or youth lose previous housing due to: Eviction or foreclosure? Destruction of or damage to the previous home? Unhealthy or unsafe conditions? Domestic violence? Abuse or neglect? The absence of a parent or guardian due to abandonment, parental incarceration or a similar reason?

47 The Brownes The Brownes were living in a home they have owned for 5 years until severe storms caused damage to the home. The home is unlivable, but the family must still pay the mortgage. Insurance is questioning if the damage was due to wind, which is covered, or flooding, which is not covered.

48 The Brownes Until the insurance claim is settled, they can’t rebuild. In the meantime, they’re staying with Mr. Browne’s brother.

49 True or False 1.Students can attend their schools of origin for one year. 2.Students who become homeless during the summer should go to school in the new location

50 Julia and Baxter Julia is a single mom. She and her son, Baxter, had a place of their own until Julia was hurt at work. Her recovery has required several surgeries and months of physical therapy. She hasn’t been able to work since, so she and a friend from her college days moved into a place together.

51 Julia and Baxter: With a Twist Julia is a single mom. She and her son, Baxter, had a place of their own until Julia was hurt at work. Her recovery has required several surgeries and months of physical therapy. She hasn’t been able to work since, so they moved in with her parents until they can get back out on their own.

52 Julia and Baxter: With a Twist Fast forward: It’s a year later and they’re still at her parents’ home.

53 Helpful Considerations Make determinations on a case-by-case basis: – How the shared housing came about – Intention of the residents – Housing options if not sharing housing – Fixed, regular and adequate criteria

54 SusannahWayland Homeless Coordinator (614)

55 education.ohio.gov

56 Follow Superintendent Ross on Twitter

57 Social ohio-department-of-education Ohio Families and Education Ohio Teachers’ Homeroom OhioEdDept storify.com/ohioEdDept


Download ppt "McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Act Susannah Wayland, Homeless Coordinator."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google