Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

NAIGS CONFERENCE 2007 CREATIVE SCIENCE TAKING A RISK What will her science experience be over the next 16 years?

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "NAIGS CONFERENCE 2007 CREATIVE SCIENCE TAKING A RISK What will her science experience be over the next 16 years?"— Presentation transcript:

1 NAIGS CONFERENCE 2007 CREATIVE SCIENCE TAKING A RISK What will her science experience be over the next 16 years?

2 CREATIVITY WHAT DO PUPILS THINK?

3 Do any of these apply to you?

4 ‘BRAVE, DARING AND BRAINY’ OWNERSHIP AND PROFESSIONAL RISK TAKING

5 Is not about waiting for the next initiative or toolkit to hit. It is about taking ownership of, and responsibility for, the curriculum that your young people experience. It involves disciplined innovation, making informed decisions and taking intelligent risks. It means rejecting the notion of a ‘one-size- fits-all’ approach and tailoring the curriculum so that it meets the needs and interests of your learners. QCA You must do the things you think you cannot do. Eleanor Roosevelt Eleanor Roosevelt Eleanor Roosevelt Creative teachers:  provide imaginative activities;  vary methods of teaching;  plan for pupils to use their own initiative;  are flexible in pursuing ideas;  respond to unplanned opportunities;  challenge thinking;  value the exchange of ideas. Oliver, A. (2006) Creative Teaching – Science. Fultons.

6 What are we looking for in a school where creativity is embedded in science? Schools taking ownership of the science curriculum Practical hands on activity Problems solving – challenging contexts Teachers as risk takers Re-think of where science is being taught Use of other people to support science teaching and learning e.g. science ambassadors Involving school in projects, clubs, science days, science weeks. Teachers involved in action research, funded projects. Linking science to topical events and issues use of primary and secondary UPD8. Working with pupil’s ideas. Using stories, poems, videos etc. in science. Identifying gifted and able pupils in science – offering special provision for them. Creative approaches to transition.

7 ‘FREE THINKER’ DESIGN YOUR OWN SCIENCE

8 STORY AND POEM FOR INSULATION INVESTIGATIONS My Dad said The new tank In the cupboard Needs a jacket I thought A jacket? What does it need a jacket for? It’s not going out. It hasn’t got arms. It hasn’t got Anything to put in pockets My Dad said The new tank in the cupboard needs a jacket So he went out and brought it back and put it on the tank. It didn’t have sleeves. It didn’t have pockets. The tank’s not going out. What a waste of money. Michael Rosen Star – Science Technology and Reading A Resource for Teachers ASE

9 IN THE NEWS SCIENCE STORIES Baby robot that can walk, talk and feel It is not quite as sophisticated as C-3PO from Star Wars or Data from Star Trek, but earth engineers have managed to create a young android that can move and speak... Razor-thin TV screen you can wear as a T-shirt Last updated at 08:55am on 27th May 2007 Comments (4) Comments (4) In the race for ever thinner displays for TVs, cell phones and other gadgets, Sony may have developed one to beat them all - a razor-thin display that bends like paper while showing full-colour video. P OSITIVES M INUSES I NTERESTING

10 ‘THINK THE UNTHINKABLE’ THE NEW CLASSROOM IS OUTDOORS

11 'We must challenge people to think: Why learn indoors?‘ Robert Brown MSP, Deputy Minister for Education and Young People

12 ‘RUN WILD’ PUPILS IN CHARGE OF THEIR OWN LEARNING!

13 Self Management Communication Teamwork Creativity & Problem Solving Think abstractly Understanding of 'how' to learn Personal responsibility when learning science "The ability to think both critically and creatively and to develop personal and interpersonal skills and dispositions is essential for functioning effectively in a changing world.” Northern Ireland Curriculum website SMART SCIENCE PROJECT

14 ‘REACH NEW HEIGHTS’ QUALITY CREATIVE SCIENCE EXPERIENCE

15 Hands on science Exploration Encouraging curiosity Relevant and interesting contexts Problem solving situations Pupils taking responsibility – making decisions Working with experts Taking intellectual risks Using skills and subject knowledge Developing subject knowledge Using scientific language Values children’s ideas

16 ENCOURAGING AND JOYFUL CREATIVE TEACHERS

17 EVIDENCE OF CREATIVE APPROACHES Creative schools encourage staff to participate in research and innovative projects. Discussion In Primary Science York University

18 INCREDIBLY MOTIVATED PUPILS

19 AWE AND WONDER

20

21 All grown up at 16 – what are her memories of science? Will her science education have contributed to her creative potential?


Download ppt "NAIGS CONFERENCE 2007 CREATIVE SCIENCE TAKING A RISK What will her science experience be over the next 16 years?"

Similar presentations


Ads by Google