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Lesson Exploring the Swine Industry. Bell: What questions do you have about pigs?

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Presentation on theme: "Lesson Exploring the Swine Industry. Bell: What questions do you have about pigs?"— Presentation transcript:

1 Lesson Exploring the Swine Industry

2 Bell: What questions do you have about pigs?

3 Student Learning Objectives Students will……….  Locate major physical characteristics of swine.  Describe common swine breeds.  Explain selection of superior animals.  Contrast various pork production systems and methods of marketing hogs.

4 Objective #1

5 What are the major parts of a hog? Terms  Piglet - a baby pig.  Barrow - a male pig that was castrated at a young age.  Gilt - a young female pig that has not given birth or farrowed.  Sow - an older female pig.  Boar - mature male hog.

6 What are the major parts of a hog?  Swine has been genetically modified by breeding practices to:  Have a strong bone structure  Raise a more of a meat-type hog that is:  Lower in fat.  Higher in leaner.

7 What are the major parts of a hog?

8  Main use of swine is for meat.  4 primary carcass cuts (most valuable meat).  picnic shoulder, ham, loin, boston shoulder.  Other carcass cuts (usually ground into sausage).  jowl, side, hock.

9 What are the major parts of a hog?

10 Parts ID Lets play a game

11 Quick Quiz  1 Identify this part  2. What are 2 products you could expect from this cut?  3.What are two of the 4 primary carcass cuts?  4. What percentages does the picnic ham makeup  5. What is an example of a cut you would expect to be ground into sausage? 1. 2

12 Objective #2

13 What are the common swine breeds and characteristics of the breeds? Terms PProlificacy tthe ability to produce large numbers of offspring. MMeat-type hog hhog that produces the greatest amount of high value meat cuts.

14  Originated in England.  Black hogs with a white belt that encircles the forepart of body, starting behind head and neck.  Erect ears.  Foraging ability.  Leanness of carcass.  Muscling.  Used as show animals or in crossbreeding programs.

15  Originated in Yorkshire, England.  Color is white, can have black freckles.  Long bodies.  Erect ears.  Large litters.  Good mothering ability.  Good feed efficiency.  Rapid growth.  Used as bacon-type hogs or in crossbreeding programs.

16  Originated in the United States.  Color is varying shades of red.  Droopy ears.  Good mothering ability.  Efficient feed converters.  Fast growth rate.  Prolificacy.  A meat-type hog.

17 Poland China  Originated in Ohio  Color is black with six white points (feet, tail, & face).  Drooping ears.  Large breed.  Produces carcasses with large loin eyes.  Very little back fat.  Commonly used in crossbreeding programs. Poland China Record Association P.O. Box 9758 Peoria, Illinois (309)

18 Hereford  Originated from the Poland China, Duroc and other breeds.  Color is red with a white face.  Droopy ears.  Prolific.  Good mothering ability.  Foraging ability. National Hereford Hog Record Association Rt. 1 Box 37, Flandreau, SD

19 Berkshire  Originated in Berkshire & Wiltshire Counties in England.  Color is black with 6 white points (feet, tail, snout).  Erect ears.  Medium-sized hog.  Lean carcass. American Berkshire Association P.O. Box 2436 West Lafayette, Indiana (317)

20 Spot  Originated from the Poland China Breed  color of large black and white spots  Spots are popular with farmers and commercial swine producers for their ability to transmit their fast-gaining, feed efficient, meat qualities to their offspring.

21 Landrace  Developed in Denmark  White in color and spots are not desirable  ears are large and heavy and are carried close to the face  prolific and satisfactory mothers  reach their top milk production after five weeks of lactation

22 It is time for the Breed ID Game

23 1.

24 2.

25 Drooping ears Large breed Originated in Ohio 3.

26 4.

27 Originated from the Poland China, Duroc and other breeds. Color is red with a white face. Droopy ears. Prolific. Good mothering ability. Foraging ability.

28 6.

29 7.  color of large black and white spots  popular with farmers and commercial swine producers for their ability to transmit their fast-gaining, feed efficient, meat qualities to their offspring.

30 8.

31 Objective #3

32

33 How do I know which hogs are better than others? Terms  Specific pathogen free (SPF)  These swine are free from diseases at birth.  Porcine Stress Syndrome (PSS)  An inherited neuromuscular disease in heavily muscled animals.  Type  Means that you are trying to find an animal that is close to ideal as possible.

34 How do I know which hogs are better than others? Terms  Meatiness - describes how much meat and fat an animal has.  Pedigree - a record of ancestry or heredity.  Production testing - the best way to evaluate and make predictions on an animal’s potential to be productive.

35 How do I know which hogs are better than others?  Selection will vary based on your personal preference and production needs.  Buying wrong animals could lead to failure of your business.  Things to look for:  size, health, type, pedigree, production testing.

36 How do I know which hogs are better than others?  Health of animals is very important.  You want to purchase animals that are disease free.  Purchase animals from a SPF herd.  Herds should be certified brucellosis & pseudorabies free.

37 How do I know which hogs are better than others?  Never buy swine from herds that do not herd health information available from the seller.  Test for PSS.  Observe animals for parasites & diseases.  Isolate animals with problems to avoid spreading.

38 How do I know which hogs are better than others?  Select for type  Meatiness  Genetic defects  PSS  Pedigree  Avoid genetic defects if research pedigrees.

39 How do I know which hogs are better than others?  Swine registries have production testing for purebred animals.  Characteristics included in registries:  offspring  health  appearance  back fat  ability to grow quickly  reproductive qualities  if breed standards are met

40 Objective #4

41

42 What are the different production systems and how do they work? Terms  Farrowing  process of a female pig giving birth.  Feeder pigs  a pig that has been weaned and weighs approximately 40 pounds.

43 What are the different production systems and how do they work?  Before the type of operation can be selected must look at your operation for:  Existing buildings.  Feed storage facilities.

44 Sow and Litter Systems  Pigs are farrowed and fed up to slaughter weight at the same farm.  Confinement or pasture systems.  Most common swine operations.

45 Sow and Litter Systems Confinement Advantages  Pigs can be marketed throughout the year.  Less labor.  Income throughout the year. Disadvantage  Expensive startup costs. Pasture Advantage  Lower initial investment. Disadvantages  More labor intense.  Production might be limited depending on season.

46 Purebred System  Produces breeding stock that others producers will use in their systems.  Requires intense management - registration paperwork.  Least common operation.  Less than 1% of all hogs raised in the U.S. are registered purebreds.  Purebreds are extremely important because of breed improvements.

47 Purebred Systems  To be a purebred producer you must know:  A great deal about genetics.  Showing & promotion of your breed.  Purebred Producers are working to:  Create animals that will meet consumer demands.

48 Feeder Pig Production System  Breed & farrow litters of piglets.  This systems farrows and weans and sells the feeder pigs.  Keeps a breeding herd of sows that farrow between 14 to 16 piglets each.  Minimal investment is required.  Must manage to keep a steady supply of feeder pigs to sell.  Less feed is required in this system.

49 Finishing Feeder-Pig System  Operations that buy feeder pigs and feed them until they are market weight approximately 240 pounds.  Profit is based upon how much feed it takes to produce 1 pound of pork.  The less feed it takes the more profit.  Balancing feed rations is very important in this system.

50 Review  What are the major cuts of a hog?  What are the common swine breeds and characteristics of the breed?  How do I know which hogs are better than others?  What are the different production systems and how do they work?


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