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Interest Groups 15. Video: The Big Picture 15 ARED_MEDIA_1/polisci/presidency/OConner_C h15_Interest_Groups_Seg1_v2.html.

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Presentation on theme: "Interest Groups 15. Video: The Big Picture 15 ARED_MEDIA_1/polisci/presidency/OConner_C h15_Interest_Groups_Seg1_v2.html."— Presentation transcript:

1 Interest Groups 15

2 Video: The Big Picture 15 ARED_MEDIA_1/polisci/presidency/OConner_C h15_Interest_Groups_Seg1_v2.html

3 15 Describe the historical development of American interest groups Trace the roots of the American interest group system Learning Objectives

4 15 Analyze the factors that make an interest group successful Identify several strategies and tactics used by organized interests Learning Objectives

5 Explain reform efforts geared toward regulating interest groups and lobbyists Learning Objectives

6 Video: The Basics SHARED_MEDIA_1/polisci/presidency/Seg2 _InterestGroups_v2.html 15

7  Theories of Interest Group Formation  Kinds of Organized Interests Roots of the American Interest Group System 15.1

8  Public Interest Groups Seek a collective good  Economic Interest Groups Promote the economic interests of their members  Governmental Units State and local governments lobby, too  Political Action Committees Officially registered fundraising organizations that represent interest groups Kinds of Interest Groups 15.1

9 TABLE 15.1: What are the Characteristics of Selected Interest Groups? 15.1

10 Video: In Context SHARED_MEDIA_1/polisci/presidency/Seg3_ InterestGroups_v2.html

11 Subscribers to this theory emphasize the role of the elites in interest group formation: a.Pluralist theory b.Disturbance theory c.Transactions theory d.None of the above

12 Subscribers to this theory emphasize the role of the elites in interest group formation: a.Pluralist theory b.Disturbance theory c.Transactions theory d.None of the above

13 Video: In the Real World HARED_MEDIA_1/polisci/presidency/Seg5_Int erestGroups_v2.html 15.1

14 The Development of American Interest Groups 15.2  National Groups Emerge ( )  The Progressive Era ( )  The Rise of the Interest Group State

15 National Groups Emerge 15.2  American Anti-Slavery Society One of the first national groups  Women’s Christian Temperance Union Sought Prohibition  The Grange Educated farmers and sought legislation  Business Interests Standard Oil Railroad

16 The Grange 15.2

17  Organized Labor American Federation of Labor Clayton Act – allowed unions to strike  Business Groups and Trade Associations National Association of Manufacturers Chamber of Commerce The Progressive Era 15.2

18  Conservative Response: Religious and Ideological Groups Moral Majority, Christian Coalition and the National Rifle Association  Business Groups, Corporations, and Associations Chamber of Commerce, Business Roundtable  Organized Labor American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations The Rise of the Interest Group State 15.2

19 How is the face of union membership changing? 15.2

20 15.2 Which statement concerning the rise of national interest groups is true? a.Their rise followed improvements in communication networks b.They generally were concerned with one issue c.They tended to fall into the public interest category d.All of the above

21 Which statement concerning the rise of national interest groups is true? a.Their rise followed improvements in communication networks b.They generally were concerned with one issue c.They tended to fall into the public interest category d.All of the above

22  Lobbying  Election Activities What Do Interest Groups Do? 15.3

23  Lobbying Congress  Lobbying the Executive Branch  Lobbying the Courts  Grassroots Lobbying  Protests and Radical Activism Lobbying 15.3

24 FIGURE 15.1: How Many Lobbyists Are There? How Much Do They Spend? 15.3

25 What Role Do Lobbyists Play in Congress? 15.3

26 Election Activities 15.3  Candidate recruitment and endorsements  Getting out the vote  Rating the candidates or office holders  Campaign contributions

27 FIGURE 15.2: How Much Money Do Interest Groups Spend on Elections? 15.3

28 15.3 This type of lobbying activity has become a favorite of anti-war and animal activists: a.Congressional lobbying b.Executive branch lobbying c.Lobbying the courts d.Grassroots lobbying e.Protests and radical activism

29 This type of lobbying activity has become a favorite of anti-war and animal activists: a.Congressional lobbying b.Executive branch lobbying c.Lobbying the courts d.Grassroots lobbying e.Protests and radical activism

30 What Makes Interest Groups Successful? 15.4  Leaders  Funding and Patrons  Members

31  The fate of interest groups may rest with their leaders William Lloyd Garrison Frances Willard Marian Wright Edelman Pat Robertson Leaders 15.4

32 Who are interest group leaders? 15.4

33  Revenue to cover costs Membership dues Direct-mail solicitations Special events Patrons Funding and Patrons 15.4

34  Levels of membership Leadership Working members Dues-paying members “free-riders”  Variety of benefits AAA - roadside assistance AARP - discounts Members 15.4

35 How Do Interest Groups Convince Potential Members to Become Dues-Paying Members? 15.4

36 15.4 Material benefits are offered by groups in order to: a.Combat the free-rider problem b.Encourage people to join c.Encourage activity within the group d.All of the above

37 Material benefits are offered by groups in order to: a.Combat the free-rider problem b.Encourage people to join c.Encourage activity within the group d.All of the above

38 Toward reform: Regulating Interest Groups and Lobbyists 15.5  Regulating Congressional Lobbyists  Regulating Executive Branch Lobbyists  Regulating Judicial Branch Lobbyists

39  Federal Regulation of Lobbying Act (1946) Required registration of lobbyists  Lobbying Disclosure Act (1995) Stricter definition of lobbying Tougher registration requirements Report clients and issues Estimate amount paid by clients  Honest Leadership and Open Government Act of 2007 Bans on gifts; longer waiting periods Regulating Congressional Lobbyists 15.5

40  Executive Branch Lobbying Disclosure Act Honest Leadership and Open Government Act 1978 Ethics in Government Act  Judicial Branch Few formal regulations Amicus curiae is chief tool Regulating Executive and Judicial Branch Lobbyists 15.5

41 15.5 Which of these lobbying regulations banned gifts and public speaking fees? a.Federal Regulation of Lobbying Act b.Lobbying Disclosure Act c.Honest Leadership and Open Government Act d.None of the above

42 Which of these lobbying regulations banned gifts and public speaking fees? a.Federal Regulation of Lobbying Act b.Lobbying Disclosure Act c.Honest Leadership and Open Government Act d.None of the above


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