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2 Common Core Four ELA Components Integration Across Three Units Reading a Foundation for Writing Reading Skills and Text Structure English Language Proficiency Depths of Knowledge

3 Four ELA Components

4 Reading Literature Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 1 Unit 2 Unit 3 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 2 ELA Pacing Guide Model

5 Speaking and Listening Language Writing ReadingReading Writing Reading Sets the Pace Unit 4 Unit 5 Unit 6 2

6 I Read first and second-hand accounts to describe differences and draw conclusions about how point of view affects understanding. RI.4.6Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. Compare student writing examples of those written from firsthand (primary) and secondhand (secondary) accounts. Draw conclusions of how point of view affects understanding (supports ELP standard). Connect to past and current texts the class has studied. I Read to interpret, by comparing and contrasting, contributions of visual, oral or quantitative information. RI.4.7Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. Compare and contrast how visual, oral or quantitative information contribute to textual understanding (supports ELP standard).Discuss how visual presentations are incorporated into informational writing I Read informational text and can describe the overall structure. RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text (supports ELP standard). Teacher models an informational text graphic organizer to examine a text’s topic. Teacher models topic on a cause and effect using a graphic organizer RI.4.5 Information is interpreted on the graphic organizer RI.4.7 Students compare topic accounts RI.4.6.

7 I Read first and second-hand accounts to describe differences and draw conclusions about how point of view affects understanding. RI.4.6Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. Compare student writing examples of those written from firsthand (primary) and secondhand (secondary) accounts. Draw conclusions of how point of view affects understanding (supports ELP standard). Connect to past and current texts the class has studied. I Read to interpret, by comparing and contrasting, contributions of visual, oral or quantitative information. RI.4.7Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. Compare and contrast how visual, oral or quantitative information contribute to textual understanding (supports ELP standard).Discuss how visual presentations are incorporated into informational writing I Read informational text and can describe the overall structure. RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text (supports ELP standard). Teacher models an informational text graphic organizer to examine a text’s topic. 1. The teacher selects one topic or theme that will support the reading standards and continue throughout all three units of study. 2. The teacher selects texts (stimuli) that match text structure (s) that will support the reading standards and continue throughout all three units of study

8 I Read first and second-hand accounts to describe differences and draw conclusions about how point of view affects understanding. RI.4.6Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic; describe the differences in focus and the information provided. Compare student writing examples of those written from firsthand (primary) and secondhand (secondary) accounts. Draw conclusions of how point of view affects understanding (supports ELP standard). Connect to past and current texts the class has studied. I Read informational text and can describe the overall structure. RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution) of events, ideas, concepts, or information in a text or part of a text (supports ELP standard). Teacher models an informational text graphic organizer to examine a text’s topic. Write to introduce a topic and group related information. W.4.2 Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. W.4.2a Introduce a topic clearly and group related information (supports ELP standard) in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. Discuss informational texts (reports, letters, speeches, response essays, narratives, etc...). Based on RI.4.5 structures, complete a graphic organizer on a studied text. I Plan to develop a topic with facts, definitions, details and quotes. I compare facts with antonyms and synonyms to clarify meaning. W.4.2b Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. L.4.5c Demonstrate an understanding of words by relating them to their opposites (antonyms) and to words with similar but not identical meanings (synonyms).Model how antonyms and synonyms can be used to clarify topic facts, definitions and details by contrast (supports ELP standard). I Edit my informational writing consulting references for spelling. I use relative pronouns and adverbs correctly. L.4.2d Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed. o L.4.1a Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why). Many language “rules” require short mini lessons. I Read to interpret, by comparing and contrasting, contributions of visual, oral or quantitative information. RI.4.7Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively (e.g., in charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages) and explain how the information contributes to an understanding of the text in which it appears. Compare and contrast how visual, oral or quantitative information contribute to textual understanding (supports ELP standard).Discuss how visual presentations are incorporated into informational writing

9 Selecting Text and Topic Planning Template Integrating the Reading Standards into all Three Units of Study Quarter 2 Informational Text Instructional Decisions For English Language Arts Integration Texts/Stimuli: Selected texts for the three informational units of study should have one consistent text structure. Students locate evidence to support claims and conclusions (SBAC Content Specifications 2012) using the clear and evident text structure in the primary text exemplar for close reading. Text Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks Text Structure(s) and Graphic OrganizerText StructuresText Structures Cause and Effect supports standard RI.4.5 and can be integrated into all three units of study. Read AloudHurricanes!, Gail Gibbons Primary Text Exemplar for Close ReadingHurricanes by Patricia Lauber Exemplar Text Complexity LevelMedium to High 4-5 grade band Additional Comparative Texts Oral Histories from Louisiana Hurricanes Topic/Theme: The theme or topic for the three informational units of study in this quarter should have one consistent theme or topic. There are enough materials/texts to support the development of the theme or topic in reading and writing. Topic or ThemeHurricanes and their effects supports standard RI.4.6 with first and secondhand accounts, and can be integrated into all three units of study. Other FocusStudents will compare visual, oral or quantitative information about the hurricanes in a final composition. This supports standard RI.4.7 and can be integrated into all three units of study.

10 RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution)... The Standard Cause and Effect RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution)... The Embedded Text Structure RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution)... The Embedded Skill

11 RI.4.5 Describe the overall structure (e.g., chronology, comparison, cause/effect, problem/solution)... RI.4.7 Interpret information presented visually, orally, or quantitatively... RI.4.6 Compare and contrast a firsthand and secondhand account of the same event or topic... Text Structures Match Comprehension Skills

12 Standard: RI.4.5 Comprehension Skill Text Organization Standard: RI.4.5 Comprehension Skill Text Organization

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14 Standard RI.4.1 Standard RI.4.2 Standard RI.4.3 Standard RI.4.4 Standard RI.4.5

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16 Selecting Texts and Topics Planning Template Integrating the Reading Standards into all Three Units of Study Quarter ___ Informational Text Instructional Decisions For English Language Arts Integration Texts/Stimuli: Selected texts for the three informational units of study should have one consistent text structure. Students locate evidence to support claims and conclusions (SBAC Content Specifications 2012) using the clear and evident text structure in the primary text exemplar for close reading. Text Exemplars and Sample Performance TasksText Exemplars and Sample Performance Tasks Text Structure (s) and Graphic Organizer Text StructuresText Structures Read Aloud Primary Text Exemplar for Close Reading Exemplar Text Complexity Level Additional Comparative Texts Topic/Theme: The theme or topic for the three informational units of study in this quarter should have one consistent theme or topic. There are enough materials/texts to support the development of the theme or topic in reading and writing. Topic or Theme Other Focus

17 Gradients in Complexity: Informational Texts Simple TextsSomewhat Complex Texts Complex TextsVery Complex Texts Layout Consistent placement of text, regular word and line spacing, often large plain font May have longer passages of uninterrupted text, often plain font Longer passages of uninterrupted text may include columns or other variations in layout, often smaller more elaborate font Very long passages of uninterrupted text that may include columns or other variations in layout, often small densely packed print Graphics and pictures that directly support and help interpret the written text Graphs, pictures, tables, charts that directly support the text Essential integrated graphics, tables, charts, formula (necessary to make meaning of text) Extensive, intricate, essential integrated tables, charts, formulas necessary to make meaning of text Simple indexes, glossariesIndexes, glossaries, occasional quotes, references Quotes, concluding appendices, indexes, glossaries, bibliography Abstracts, footnotes, citations and detailed indexes, appendices, bibliography Supportive signposting and enhancements Reduced signposting and enhancements Minimal signposting and/or enhancementsIntegrated signposting conforming to disciplinary formats. No enhancements Purpose and Meaning A single or simple purpose conveying clear or factual information Purpose involves conveying a range of more detailed information Purpose includes explaining or interpreting information Purpose may include examining/evaluating complex, sometimes theoretical and contested information Meaning is clear, concrete with a narrow focus Meaning is more involved with a broader focus Meaning includes more complex concepts and a higher level of detail Meaning is intricate, with abstract theoretical elements Structure The organization of the text is clear or chronological and/or easy to predict The organization of the text may include a thesis or reasoned explanation in addition to facts The organization of the text may contain multiple pathways, more than one thesis and/or several genres The organization of the text is intricate or specialized for a particular discipline Connections among events or ideas are explicit and clear. Connections among events or ideas are sometimes implicit or subtle. Connections among events or ideas are often implicit or subtle Connections among events or ideas are implicit or subtle throughout the text. One mode of communication is evident May include different modes of communication Includes smaller sections that utilize different modes of communication of varying complexity Includes sustained sections that utilize different modes of communication and/or hybrid or non-linear texts Language Features Mainly simple sentencesSimple and compound sentences with some more complex constructions Many complex sentences with increased subordinate phrases and clauses or transition words Mainly complex sentences, often containing multiple concepts Simple language style, sometimes with narrative elements Increased objective style and passive constructions with higher factual content Objective/passive style with higher conceptual content and increasing nominalization Specialized disciplinary style with dense conceptual content and high nominalization Vocabulary is mostly familiarVocabulary includes some unfamiliar, context-dependent words Includes much academic vocabulary and some domain specific (content) vocabulary Includes extensive academic and domain specific (content) vocabulary Knowledge Demands Information General topic is familiar, with details known by reader General topic is familiar, with some details new to reader General topic is somewhat familiar but with many details unknown to reader General topic is mostly unfamiliar with most details unknown to reader Simple, concrete ideasBoth simple and more complicated, abstract ideas A range of recognizable ideas and challenging abstract concepts Many new ideas and/or complex, challenging, abstract and theoretical concepts Source: Local Assessment Toolkit: Tools for examining text updated 2010 (Karin Hess and Sheeana Hevery. Permission to reproduce is given when authorship is fully

18 Gradients in Complexity: Literary Texts Simple TextsSomewhat Complex TextsComplex TextsVery Complex Texts Layout Consistent placement of text, regular word and line spacing, often large plain font May have longer passages of uninterrupted text, often plain font Longer passages of uninterrupted text may include columns or other variations in layout, often smaller more elaborate font Very long passages of uninterrupted text that may include columns or other variations in layout, often small densely packed print Extensive illustrations that directly support and help interpret the written text A range of illustrations that support selected parts of the text A few illustrations that support the textMinimal illustrations that support the text Supportive signposting and enhancements Reduced signposting and enhancements Minimal signposting and/or enhancements Integrated signposting conforming to literary devices. No enhancements Purpose and Meaning Purpose usually stated explicitly in the title or in the beginning of the text Purpose tends to be revealed early in the text, but may be conveyed with some subtlety Purpose is implicit and may be revealed over the entirety of the text Purpose implicit or subtle, is sometimes ambiguous and revealed over the entirety of the text One level of meaningMore than one level of meaning, with levels clearly distinguished from each other Several levels of meaning that may be difficult to identify/separate Several levels and competing elements of meaning that are difficult to identify/separate and interpret Theme is obvious and revealed early in the text Theme is clear and revealed early in the text, but may be conveyed with some subtlety Theme may be implicit or subtle, is sometimes ambiguous and may be revealed over the entirety of the text Theme is implicit or subtle, is often ambiguous, and is revealed over the entirety of the text Structure The organization of the text is clear, chronological and/or easy to predict The organization of the text may have additional characters, two or more storylines and is occasionally difficult to predict The organization of the text may include, subplots, time shifts and more complex characters The organization of the text is intricate with regard to elements such as narrative viewpoint, time shifts, multiple characters, storylines and detail Connections among events or ideas are explicit and clear. Connections among events or ideas are sometimes implicit or subtle. Connections among events or ideas are often implicit or subtle Connections among events or ideas are implicit or subtle throughout the text. One mode of communication is evident May include different modes of communication Includes smaller sections that utilize different modes of communication of varying complexity Includes sustained sections that utilize different modes of communication and/or hybrid or non-linear texts Language Features The organization of the text may include, subplots, time shifts and more complex characters Simple and compound sentences with some more complex constructions Many complex sentences with increased subordinate phrases and clauses Many complex sentences, often containing intricate detail or concepts Simple, literal languageMainly literal, common languageSome figurative or literary languageMuch figurative or literary language such as metaphor, analogy, and connotative language Vocabulary is mostly familiarSome unfamiliar vocabularyIncludes much academic vocabulary and some domain specific (content) vocabulary Includes extensive academic and domain specific (content) vocabulary, and possibly archaic language Knowled ge Demand s Fiction Little assumed personal experience or cultural knowledge Some assumed personal experience and/or cultural knowledge Much assumed personal experience and/or cultural knowledge Extensive, demanding, assumed personal experience and/or cultural knowledge Simple ideasBoth simple and more complicated ideas A range of recognizable ideas and challenging concepts Many new ideas and/or complex, challenging concepts Source: Local Assessment Toolkit: Tools for examining text updated 2010 (Karin Hess and Sheeana Hevery. Permission to reproduce is given when authorship is fully

19 19 Text Structures Matching Comprehension Skills Cause and Effect Cause and Effect Sub-Categories Cause and EffectCause and Effect Predicting Outcomes Prediction Inference InferencesInferences Drawing Conclusions Sequence Sequence Sub-Categories SequencingSequencing Main Idea and Details Main Idea Note Taking Following Directions Story Structure Text Organization Summarizing Compare and Contrast Compare and Contrast Sub-Categories Compare and ContrastCompare and Contrast Fantasy and Realism Fact and Opinion Facts and Opinions Supporting FactsFacts and OpinionsSupporting Facts Analyzing * Description Description Sub-Categories Generalizations Categorize Classify Reports Arranged by Categories Problem and Solution Problem and Solution Sub-Categories Evaluating Propaganda Making Judgments Author’s Purpose Point of ViewPoint of View Interpretation Hypothesis *

20 20 Genre ________________Structure ________________ Graphic Organizer ________________DOK Assessment Level _____________ Comprehension Skill Planning Tool. Instructional Comprehension Skill Planning Tool. Standard: Comprehension Skill:

21 21 Text Structures Possible Reading Genres Cause and Effect Cause/effect-The author delineates one or more causes and then describes the ensuing effects. Sophisticated Narratives Realistic Fiction Informational Text Event Building Stories Fictional Narratives Sequence The author uses numerical or chronological order to list items or events. Memoirs Autobiographical Fairy Tales Folk Tales Story Series Historical Events Fantasy Fables Myths Science Fiction Realistic Fiction Oral Histories Compare and Contrast The author compares and contrasts two or more similar events, topics, or objects. Historic Non-Fiction & Fiction Science Non-Fiction Social Studies Non-Fiction Description The author describes a topic. Informational Texts and Books Riddle Books Poems Prose Problem and Solution The author poses a problem or question and then gives the answer. Realistic Fiction Informational Writing Arguments Scientific Reports and Research Some Folk Tales Text Structures Match Reading Genres

22 22 Text Structures Graphic Organizers Cause and Effect Prediction Inferences Conclusions Wheel Chain Process Cause = Effect Fishbone Goal-Reasons Web Process-Cause-Effect Sequence Main idea and details Note taking Following directions Story structure Text organization Summarizing Timeline Flow Chart Event Diagrams Y-Chart Ladder Graph Garden Gate Story Maps Star Chart Cycle Diagram E-Chart Tree Chart Sandwich Chart Tic-Tac-Toe Sequence Chart Compare and Contrast Fact and opinion fantasy and realism Analyzing* Venn Diagram T-Chart Compare/Contrast Matrix Fact and Opinion Chart Comparison Chart Perspectives Chart Double Bubble Description Generalizations Categorize/classify Arranging ISP Chart (information - sources - page) Observation Chart Sense Chart KWS Chart Classification Chart Problem and Solution Propaganda Evaluating Judgments Author’s purpose Interpretation Hypothesis Spiral Effects Decision Making Diagram Problem-Solution Chart Persuasion Map Ranking Charts If-Then Charts Synectics Organizers Scientific Method Charts Decision Making Graphic Historical Investigation Invention Graphic Problem Solving Text Structures Matching Graphic Organizers Graphic Organizers and Uses Eduplace Graphic Organizers Write Design Graphic Organizers Marzano Graphic Organizers

23 23 Assess comprehension skills at the standard’s Depth of Knowledge.

24 24 Depth of Knowledge (DOK) Reading Standard Levels Depth of Knowledge (DOK) Reading Standard Levels Literary DOKsK Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard 8n/a Standard Standard 10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently. Informational DOKsK Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard Standard 10 Read and comprehend complex literary and informational texts independently and proficiently.


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