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Julie Mullins-Turner AHSGE Objective III-3 Understanding Figurative Language.

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Presentation on theme: "Julie Mullins-Turner AHSGE Objective III-3 Understanding Figurative Language."— Presentation transcript:

1 Julie Mullins-Turner AHSGE Objective III-3 Understanding Figurative Language

2 Julie Mullins-Turner Students, you are encouraged to take notes on this presentation.

3 Julie Mullins-Turner Figurative Language Figurative language is language that has meaning beyond the literal meaning of the words. Figurative language is language that has meaning beyond the literal meaning of the words.

4 Julie Mullins-Turner Writers use figurative language to establish an image in the reader’s mind and create an association between some element of a passage and something completely unrelated, yet easily understood. Writers use figurative language to establish an image in the reader’s mind and create an association between some element of a passage and something completely unrelated, yet easily understood.

5 Julie Mullins-Turner Simile a comparison using the word like or as a comparison using the word like or as Examples: Examples: Her room was like a pig sty. Her pillow was as soft as silk.

6 Julie Mullins-Turner Metaphor a comparison that does not use the word like or as a comparison that does not use the word like or as Example: Example: She is a rock during times of stress. His thoughts are an inspiration.

7 Julie Mullins-TurnerAnalogy an extended comparison that explains or clarifies an idea an extended comparison that explains or clarifies an idea Example: Example: For some women going shopping is like men going fishing. The anticipation and feelings of success, whether from finding a bargain or catching a fish, are finding a bargain or catching a fish, are part of both experiences. part of both experiences.

8 Julie Mullins-TurnerImagery sensory language, or descriptive language that appeals to the senses, used to create a vivid mental image sensory language, or descriptive language that appeals to the senses, used to create a vivid mental image Example: Example: The sweet smell of baked goods drew the child towards the shiny display case.

9 Julie Mullins-TurnerPersonification giving an inanimate object, animal, or idea human qualities or abilities giving an inanimate object, animal, or idea human qualities or abilities Example: Example: The wind whispered its secrets to me. The tree’s skinny arms swayed in the wind. the wind. The thunder’s voice rumbled during the storm.

10 Julie Mullins-TurnerHyperbole an extravagant exaggeration an extravagant exaggeration Example: Example: We walked a million miles to the fair. His shoes were the size of ships.

11 Julie Mullins-Turner As you read and analyze figurative language. Keep these things in mind: The use of the word like or as does not necessarily signal a simile, as for example, in the sentence Jason and Rick are as close as two brothers can be. This is not a simile. Jason and Rick are brothers. No comparison is being made between unlike things. The use of the word like or as does not necessarily signal a simile, as for example, in the sentence Jason and Rick are as close as two brothers can be. This is not a simile. Jason and Rick are brothers. No comparison is being made between unlike things.

12 Julie Mullins-Turner An analogy is similar to a simile or metaphor, but usually longer and contains details that help explain an idea. An analogy is similar to a simile or metaphor, but usually longer and contains details that help explain an idea.

13 Julie Mullins-Turner Imagery often contains similes, metaphors, personification, and other forms of figurative language. Imagery often contains similes, metaphors, personification, and other forms of figurative language.

14 Julie Mullins-Turner Read the following passage. excerpt from The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde by Robert Louis Stevenson

15 Julie Mullins-Turner Mr. Utterson the lawyer was a man of a rugged countenance, that was never lighted by a smile; cold, scanty and embarrassed in discourse; backward in sentiment; lean, long, dusty, dreary, and yet somehow lovable…He was austere with himself…But he had an approved tolerance for others…

16 Julie Mullins-Turner It is the mark of a modest man to accept his friendly circle ready-made from the hands of opportunity; and that was the lawyer’s way. His friends were those of his own blood or those whom he had known the longest; his affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object.

17 Julie Mullins-Turner Hence, no doubt, the bond that united him to Mr. Richard Enfield, his distant kinsman, the well- known man about town. It was a nut to crack for many, what these two could see in each other, or what subject they could find in common.

18 Julie Mullins-Turner It was reported by those who encountered them in their Sunday walks, that they said nothing, looked singularly dull, and would hail with obvious relief the appearance of a friend.

19 Julie Mullins-Turner For all that, the two men put the greatest store by these excursions, counted them the chief jewel of each week, and not only set aside occasions of pleasure, but even resisted the calls of business, that they might enjoy them uninterrupted.

20 Julie Mullins-Turner It chanced on one of these rambles that their way led them down a by-street in a busy quarter of London. The street was small and what is called quiet, but it drove a thriving trade on the week-days.

21 Julie Mullins-Turner The inhabitants were all doing well, it seemed…Even on a Sunday when it veiled its more florid charms and lay comparatively empty of passage, the street shone out in contrast to its dingy neighborhood, like a fire in a forest;

22 Julie Mullins-Turner And with its freshly painted shutters, well-polished brasses, and general cleanliness and gaiety of note, instantly caught and pleased the eye of the passenger.

23 Julie Mullins-Turner Use the passage to answer each question. 1. What idea or thing does Stevenson personify in the passage? A. Discourse B. Opportunity C. Blood D. friendship

24 Julie Mullins-Turner 1. What idea or thing does Stevenson personify in the passage? A. Discourse B. Opportunity C. Blood D. friendship

25 Julie Mullins-Turner 2. When Stevenson says Mr. Utterson’s “affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object,” he actually means. A. Mr. Utterson made friends easily and quickly. quickly. B. Mr. Utterson became more likable to people over time. people over time. C. Mr. Utterson developed close friendships with people whom he had known for a with people whom he had known for a long time and who shared his interests. long time and who shared his interests. D. Mr. Utterson’s friendships grew because of his long association with people not his long association with people not because of a genuine appreciation. because of a genuine appreciation.

26 Julie Mullins-Turner 2. When Stevenson says Mr. Utterson’s “affections, like ivy, were the growth of time, they implied no aptness in the object,” he actually means. A. Mr. Utterson made friends easily and quickly. quickly. B. Mr. Utterson became more likable to people over time. people over time. C. Mr. Utterson developed close friendships with people whom he had known for a with people whom he had known for a long time and who shared his interests. long time and who shared his interests. D. Mr. Utterson’s friendships grew because of his long association with people not his long association with people not because of a genuine appreciation. because of a genuine appreciation.

27 Julie Mullins-Turner 3. What does Stevenson mean by “It was a nut to crack for many?” A. It was difficult for many people to understand. to understand. B. It was a crazy idea. C. Many people did not accept it. D. Only someone who knew how to crack nuts could understand. crack nuts could understand.

28 Julie Mullins-Turner 3. What does Stevenson mean by “It was a nut to crack for many?” A. It was difficult for many people to understand. to understand. B. It was a crazy idea. C. Many people did not accept it. D. Only someone who knew how to crack nuts could understand. crack nuts could understand.

29 Julie Mullins-Turner 4. Which sentence states the actual meaning of the phrase “counted them the chief jewel of each week” as used in the passage? A. Counted up the value of precious gems sold in a week. sold in a week. B. Considered their walks the most valued and important event of the week. and important event of the week. C. Counted down the days of the week until their walks until their walks D. Enjoyed the opportunities that their walks provided for them to discuss walks provided for them to discuss business business

30 Julie Mullins-Turner 4. Which sentence states the actual meaning of the phrase “counted them the chief jewel of each week” as used in the passage? A. Counted up the value of precious gems sold in a week. sold in a week. B. Considered their walks the most valued and important event of the week. and important event of the week. C. Counted down the days of the week until their walks until their walks D. Enjoyed the opportunities that their walks provided for them to discuss walks provided for them to discuss business business

31 Julie Mullins-Turner 5. Who or what is the fire in the phrase, “like a fire in a forest?” A. A dingy neighborhood B. A fire in a shop C. A bustling street of shops D. Freshly painted shutters

32 Julie Mullins-Turner 5. Who or what is the fire in the phrase, “like a fire in a forest?” A. A dingy neighborhood B. A fire in a shop C. A bustling street of shops D. Freshly painted shutters


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