Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

WestEd.org Infant & Toddler Group Care Including the Infant in the Curriculum: Facilitating Early Learning.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "WestEd.org Infant & Toddler Group Care Including the Infant in the Curriculum: Facilitating Early Learning."— Presentation transcript:

1 WestEd.org Infant & Toddler Group Care Including the Infant in the Curriculum: Facilitating Early Learning

2 WestEd.org Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: Explain how infants and toddlers engage their world to learn in the context of important relationships, and how infants are both competent and vulnerable. Describe the four courses in the infant’s curriculum (social- emotional, cognitive, language/literacy, and perceptual/motor development). Observe and respond to each infant’s cues and interests expressed in their play as a basis for planning interactions, materials, as well as the indoor and outdoor environment. Develop a daily schedule that is responsive to the children’s needs and allows for blocks of uninterrupted play time.

3 WestEd.org Do you agree? With a partner, discuss the following statement: Parents and caregivers need to “teach” babies in order to stimulate cognitive development.

4 WestEd.org Four Insights: How Infants and Toddlers Engage the World Insight 1: Infants and toddlers learn and develop in the context of important relationships. Relationships, while important throughout life, play an especially crucial role in the early years. Relationships support all learning Domains. Self-regulation develops in the context of relationships. Infant/Toddler Learning and Development Program Guidelines, California Department of Education, 2006

5 WestEd.org According to research… Infants are self-starters when it comes to learning. Care teachers can best facilitate intellectual growth by being responsive to infants’ cues, rather than “teaching” or “initiating cognitive activities”.

6 WestEd.org Four Insights: How Infants and Toddlers Engage the World Insight 2: Infants and toddlers are competent. All infants and toddlers, including those with disabilities or other special needs, are curious, active, self-motivated learners. Infants and toddlers teach themselves when they are free to move on their own. Communication and language begin developing early.

7 WestEd.org Four Insights: How Infants and Toddlers Engage the World Insight 3: Infants and toddlers are vulnerable. Infants orient to adults for protection. Nurturance from adults affects the developing brain. All infants and toddlers are well equipped by nature to seek out close, caring relationships that give them the security they need to grow and learn. Infants rely on consistent, predictable and positive experiences with adults to become secure.

8 WestEd.org Four Insights: How Infants and Toddlers Engage the World Insight 3 (cont’d): Infants and toddlers are vulnerable. Infants’ physical health and safety are in the hands of those who care for them. Infants with disabilities, other special needs, or vulnerabilities benefit from early intervention. Infants and toddlers, like all children, are vulnerable to abuse and neglect.

9 WestEd.org Four Insights: How Infants and Toddlers Engage the World Insight 4: Infants and toddlers are a unique blend of nature and nurture. Temperament is a window to the child. Culture, language and developmental differences contribute to the child’s uniqueness.

10 WestEd.org How Infants and Toddlers Engage the World New Perspectives on Infant/Toddler Learning, Development, and Care, 2006.

11 WestEd.org Reflection: Child-Initiated or Teacher- Initiated Activities Together with a partner, make a list of all of the activities in your classroom in which infants and toddlers have engaged over the past few days. Divide the items on the list into two columns: child- initiated and teacher-initiated activities. Compare the number of items in each column. Which list is longer? Recall the children’s interest and engagement in the identified activities. Which activities resulted in more child engagement?

12 WestEd.org Question: If infant curriculum were listed in the local college catalog, how would the courses be listed?

13 WestEd.org The Infant’s Curriculum Physical Development 101 Social Relations 101 Language Development 101 Intellectual Development 101 The Next Step: Including the Infant in the Curriculum, 2006

14 WestEd.org Infant Curriculum: Introduction and Key Concepts The Next Step: Including the Infant in the Curriculum, 2004.

15 WestEd.org Activity: Reflecting on Infant Curriculum Take a moment to reflect upon your interactions with the infants and toddlers and the learning environment. Which of these I/T “courses” does your program best support? Which “course” needs more work?

16 WestEd.org The Infant Care Teacher’s Roles in Facilitating Learning: Adapt environment and interactions in response to the child’s changing interest and needs. Support Practice and Repetition by not interrupting infant’s repeated action; Expand Learning by providing the amount of novelty for which the child is ready; elaborate on a child’s play by posing problems, introduce more complex and challenging materials. The Next Step: Including the Infant in the Curriculum, 2004

17 WestEd.org How does your program plan I/T Curriculum? In groups, discuss and record answers to the following: How, when, and why do you observe infants and toddlers? How do you document I/T Learning? When and how do you do curriculum planning?

18 WestEd.org Curriculum Planning Process

19 WestEd.org Planning a Child’s Next Day New Perspectives on I/T Learning and Development and Care, 2006.

20 WestEd.org Revisiting the Learning Objectives: Participants will be able to: Explain how infants and toddlers engage their world to learn in the context of important relationships, and how infants are both competent and vulnerable. Describe the four courses in the infant’s curriculum (social- emotional, cognitive, language/literacy, and perceptual/motor development). Observe and respond to each infant’s cues and interests expressed in their play as a basis for planning interactions, materials, as well as the indoor and outdoor environment. Develop a daily schedule that is responsive to the children’s needs and allows for blocks of uninterrupted play time.


Download ppt "WestEd.org Infant & Toddler Group Care Including the Infant in the Curriculum: Facilitating Early Learning."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google