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Foldable Notes Graphic Organizer 1. Fold a piece of paper lengthwise with a quarter inch flap left at the bottom. 2. Fold the paper into thirds. Remember.

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Presentation on theme: "Foldable Notes Graphic Organizer 1. Fold a piece of paper lengthwise with a quarter inch flap left at the bottom. 2. Fold the paper into thirds. Remember."— Presentation transcript:

1 Foldable Notes Graphic Organizer 1. Fold a piece of paper lengthwise with a quarter inch flap left at the bottom. 2. Fold the paper into thirds. Remember when folding into thirds, the portion that you fold over is approximately the same size as the remaining side. End Goal: A graphic organizer with 6 labeled sections for notes.

2 Foldable Notes Graphic Organizer 3. Fold paper one last time. This time in half. 4. Unfold. You should have six sections. Label the bottom flap “Nullification - the idea that a state has the right to invalidate a federal law.” From this to this. Nullification - the idea that a state has the right to invalidate a federal law

3 Foldable Notes Graphic Organizer 5. Label each flap from left to right: Alien and Sedition Acts Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions Hartford Convention Tariff of Abominations The Nullification Crisis 6.My Conclusion – Where you decide if a state should be allowed to use nullification and two reasons why or why not

4 The Nullification Notes: A States’ Rights Debate Alien and Sedition Acts Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions Hartford Convention Key Concept- FEDERALISM-American government structure is organized so powers are divided between Federal and State governments.

5 Alien and Sedition Acts  The Alien Act-Could Expel foreigners for looking suspicious.  Sedition Act- Forbade people from publishing or voicing criticism against the government. Back to Home/ Front Page

6 Virginia and Kentucky Resolutions  Kentucky and Virginia passed legislation (laws) at the state level which nullified (cancelled) the Alien and Sedition acts on the basis that they were unconstitutional. Back to Home/ Front Page

7 Hartford Convention War of 1812  Many New Englanders from the Federalist party opposed the war. They met to discuss the idea of nullifying the war act and/or seceding from the United States to form their own country. They dropped this idea after the U.S. victory at the Battle of New Orleans. Back to Home/ Front Page

8 Tariff of Abominations  Tariff- Tax on imported goods.  A high tariff was passed to protect northern manufacturers- Why? So they sell more.  The South calls it an “abomination” because they buy foreign goods. The tax made the goods more expensive. Back to Home/ Front Page

9 The Nullification Crisis  South Carolina nullifies the Federal law.  S.C. says that the Kentucky and Virginia resolutions set precedent that states could nullify federal laws. Back to Home/ Front Page

10 Jackson Responds  Jackson was enraged!  He declared that S. Carolina would enforce the law.  He passed the Force Bill- Approved by congress saying that he could use the army to enforce laws if necessary. Back to Home/ Front Page

11 Can a State Nullify a Law?  It is a question of the supremacy of the national government versus state sovereignty (states’ rights). Back to Home/ Front Page

12 No  Senator Daniel Webster argued that only the Supreme Court could decide whether a law was constitutional. He said the federal government was sovereign, that the Union was perpetual, and that any attempt to dismember it was nothing less than treason. Back to Home/ Front Page

13 Yes   States formed the Union by an agreement (or "compact") among the States, and that as creators of the federal government, the States have the final authority to determine the limits of the power of that government. States, not the federal courts are the ultimate interpreters of the extent of the federal government's power. Thus states may reject, or nullify, federal laws that the States believe are beyond the federal government's constitutional powers.

14 What about Secession?   If the states have the right to nullify federal laws that they believe are beyond the federal government's constitutional powers, do they have the right to secede from the Union? Back


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