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Shakedown! Instructions Play Game Quit Brought to you by the International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech.

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Presentation on theme: "Shakedown! Instructions Play Game Quit Brought to you by the International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech."— Presentation transcript:

1 Shakedown! Instructions Play Game Quit Brought to you by the International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

2 General Rules: You must have Microsoft PowerPoint and run it in slide show mode in order for this game to work properly Break class into groups. Suggested group size is 5-6 students per group. Group one will choose a difficulty level and point value. Click on that square to read the question. Group one will have approximately 30 seconds to discuss the question and attempt to answer it correctly.Group one will choose a difficulty level and point value. Click on that square to read the question. Group one will have approximately 30 seconds to discuss the question and attempt to answer it correctly. If group one does not know the answer to the question, they can choose to pass it to group two. If group two answers the question correctly, they get the points added to their score. It then becomes group two’s normal turn to choose a question. If group two answers the question incorrectly, they receive no points and it becomes group three’s normal turn.If group one does not know the answer to the question, they can choose to pass it to group two. If group two answers the question correctly, they get the points added to their score. It then becomes group two’s normal turn to choose a question. If group two answers the question incorrectly, they receive no points and it becomes group three’s normal turn. If group one chooses to answer the question, then click on the chosen answer to reveal if it is correct. If they answered the question correctly, they receive the points for the question and it is group two’s turn. If they answer the question incorrectly, they receive no points and it is group two’s turn. Group two can choose to answer the current question or return to the menu to choose a new one.If group one chooses to answer the question, then click on the chosen answer to reveal if it is correct. If they answered the question correctly, they receive the points for the question and it is group two’s turn. If they answer the question incorrectly, they receive no points and it is group two’s turn. Group two can choose to answer the current question or return to the menu to choose a new one. Continue in this pattern through all of the groups until every questions has been answered. Main Menu How to Play Score board: Students can keep score on paper or on the board. As each group receives points, add them together. At the end, the group with the most points wins. There is one double-play on the board. When this comes up, students receive double points for getting the correct answer. PowerPoint does not keep track of which squares students have already picked. It is recommended to print slide three from PowerPoint before playing the game and cross off the squares as students choose them. See notes for printer instructions. © International Dark-Sky Association Images © International Dark-Sky Association

3 Level 1 50 Level 2Level Photo: NASA/JPL-Caltech © International Dark-Sky Association Main Menu

4 B. Jupiter A. Pluto (a dwarf planet) C. Venus © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

5 That is Correct!! Menu Venus is about the same size as Earth. © International Dark-Sky Association

6 I’m sorry. That is incorrect! Try Again © International Dark-Sky Association

7 B. Jupiter A. Mercury C. Neptune © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

8 That is Correct!! Menu Jupiter is the biggest planet in the Solar System. © International Dark-Sky Association

9 A. Mercury B. Saturn C. Venus © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

10 That is Correct!! Menu Venus is the hottest planet in the Solar System. © International Dark-Sky Association

11 A.B. -OR- © International Dark-Sky Association Images © International Dark-Sky Association

12 That is Correct!! Menu Picture A shows bad outdoor lighting that causes a glow above cities, interferes with viewing the stars, and disrupts the environment. © International Dark-Sky Association

13 UranusMarsVenus A. Uranus and Venus B. Mars and Uranus C. Venus and Mars © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

14 That is Correct!! Menu The order of the planets goes Venus, Earth, and then Mars. © International Dark-Sky Association

15 C. Venus A. Earth B. Pluto © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

16 That is Correct!! Menu Pluto is now considered a dwarf planet because of its unusual orbit and small size. © International Dark-Sky Association

17 A. The Sun B. Saturn A. A Comet © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

18 That is Correct!! Menu The Sun is the name of the star closest to Earth. It provides most of the natural energy needed to live on Earth. © International Dark-Sky Association

19 B. All of the Above A. Insects and mammals AmphibiansBirdsReptiles InsectsMammals C. Birds and Amphibians © International Dark-Sky Association Images © U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services

20 That is Correct!! Menu All creatures – including amphibians, reptiles, insects, birds, and mammals – are affected by light pollution. © International Dark-Sky Association

21 B. Neptune A. Mars C. Venus © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

22 That is Correct!! Menu Neptune was the first planet discovered by the use of mathematics rather than by observation. © International Dark-Sky Association

23 B. Mercury A. Uranus C. Earth © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

24 That is Correct!! Menu Uranus is the only planet in the Solar System that rotates on its side. © International Dark-Sky Association

25 B. Excessive outdoor night lighting A. Fully-shielded light fixtures C. Turning lights off when not in use © International Dark-Sky Association Images © International Dark-Sky Association

26 That is Correct!! Menu Excessive night lighting is a major cause of light pollution and sky glow. © International Dark-Sky Association

27 TRUE OR FALSE © International Dark-Sky Association

28 That is Correct!! Menu Light pollution causes sky glow and glare that can negatively affect the study of astronomy. © International Dark-Sky Association

29 A. One B. Zero C. Three © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

30 That is Correct!! Menu Earth has only one moon. © International Dark-Sky Association

31 A. Mars B. Earth C. Saturn © International Dark-Sky Association Images © NASA/JPL-Caltech

32 That is Correct!! Menu Earth is the only planet with known life. © International Dark-Sky Association

33 © International Dark-Sky Association Image © NASA/JPL-Caltech

34 1.Mercury 2. Venus 3. Earth 4. Mars 5. Jupiter 6. Saturn 7. Uranus 8. Neptune 9. Pluto (a dwarf planet) Menu © International Dark-Sky Association Image © NASA/JPL-Caltech

35 Thank you for playing. Credits: Created by: The International Dark-Sky Association Solar System Photos: : © NASA/JPL-Caltech Other Photos: © International Dark-Sky Association


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