Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Hazard Communication and General Awareness. General Awareness – Two Key Definitions: Hazmat Employer A company/person who utilizes one or more employees.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Hazard Communication and General Awareness. General Awareness – Two Key Definitions: Hazmat Employer A company/person who utilizes one or more employees."— Presentation transcript:

1 Hazard Communication and General Awareness

2 General Awareness – Two Key Definitions: Hazmat Employer A company/person who utilizes one or more employees to transport or cause to transport, hazardous materials in commerce, or One who represents, marks, certifies, sells, offers, reconditions, tests, repairs, or modifies containers, drums, or packaging for use in transporting hazardous materials.

3 General Awareness – Two Key Definitions: Hazmat Employer (con’t) This includes: a. Owners and operator of vehicles that transport hazardous materials b. Any department or agency of the United States c. A State or political subdivision of a State d. An Indian tribe that deals with hazardous material as a form of business.

4 General Awareness – Two Key Definitions: Hazmat Employee One who directly affects the safe transportation of hazardous materials, either as a self-employed person or one who performs duties relating to hazardous materials as part of the job. This includes the owner/operator of a motor vehicle that transports hazardous materials in commerce.

5 Based on these definitions, workers who must be trained include those who: Load or unload hazardous materials Test, recondition, repair, modify, or mark containers, drums or packaging used in transporting hazardous materials Prepare hazardous materials for transporting Are responsible for the safe transporting of hazardous materials (supervisors for example), or Operate a vehicle transporting hazardous materials.

6 General Awareness/Familiarization Training will: Increase your awareness of the purpose of the Hazardous Materials Regulations and of the hazard communication requirements Ensure that everyone involved in the transportation of hazardous materials uses uniform procedures.

7 Introduction Part 172 Subpart H of the Hazardous Materials Regulations sets training requirements for individuals involved in all modes of transportation over-the-road, rail, aircraft, or vessel) of hazardous materials. The purpose is to ensure that hazmat employers train their hazmat employees regarding safe practices in the following areas:

8

9 DOT CLASSIFICATIONS

10 DOT CLASSIFICATION “CLASSES”Hazardous Materials Are Grouped Into “CLASSES” By The DOT

11 Hazmat Classification Guidelines Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Class 2 (Gas) Materials Class 3 (Flammable Liquid) Materials Class 4 (Flammable Solid) Materials Class 5.1 (Oxidizing) Materials Class 5.2 (Organic Peroxide) Materials

12 Hazmat Classification Guidelines Class 6 (Poison) Materials Class 7 (Radioactive) Materials Class 8 (Corrosive) Materials Class 9 (Miscellaneous) Materials Other Regulated Materials (ORM–D)

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

26 Label Only

27

28

29

30 3257

31 # on a Orange Panel Identification Numbers

32 Placard Only - Not A Class Not For Cargo Tanks

33 Elevated Temperature Material

34 HOT

35 or NOT HOT

36 DEFINITIONS- What Are Elevated Temperature Materials?

37 Elevated Temp. Materials That Meets One of the Following Criteria:An Elevated Temperature Material Is a Material Offered for Transportation in Bulk Packaging That Meets One of the Following Criteria:

38 Elevated Temp. Materials Ê A Liquid With a Temperature at or Above 100°C (212°F); Or

39 Elevated Temp. Materials Ë A Liquid With a Flash Point at or Above 37.8°C (100°F) That Is Intentionally Heated and Transported at or Above Its Flash Point; Or

40 Elevated Temp. Materials Ì A Solid With a Temperature at or Above 240°C (464°F)

41 Elevated Temp. Materials If an Elevated Temperature Material Is Not In Fact Disclosed in the Shipping Name... The Word “HOT” Must Immediately Precede the Proper Shipping Name of the Material on the Shipping Paper.

42 Elevated Temp. Materials Example: Hot, Resin Solution, 3, UN1886, II

43 LABELS 4Communicating Risks Warning...

44 LABELS Color-Coded Systems Are Used to Label Hazardous Materials. Some Labels Have Bars or Diamonds That Indicate the Kind of Hazards. Red Yellow Blue For Instance, Red a Means Fire Hazard, Yellow Means a Reactivity Hazard, Blue Means a Health Hazard. The White Area of a Label Is for Other Additional Information.

45 Rectangle Bar Type Labels FIRE HAZARD ??? HEALTH HAZARD ??? REACTIVITY ??? SPECIFIC HAZARD ???

46 DIAMOND SHAPE LABELS Health Hazard Reactivity Fire Hazard Specific Hazard

47 Fire Hazard - Red Materials which will rapidly or completely vaporize at atmospheric pressure and normal ambient temperature, or which are readily dispersed in air and which will burn readily. (Flash Points Below 73 Degrees F) 4

48 Fire Hazard - Red (Flash Points Below 100 Degrees F) Liquids or solids that can be ignited under almost all ambient temperature conditions (Flash Points Below 100 Degrees F) 3

49 Fire Hazard - Red (Flash Points Below 200 Degrees F) Materials that must be moderately heated or exposed to relatively high ambient temperatures before ignition can occur (Flash Points Below 200 Degrees F) 2

50 Fire Hazard - Red (Flash Points Above 200 Degrees F) Materials that must be preheated before ignition can occur (Flash Points Above 200 Degrees F) 1

51 Fire Hazard - Red Materials that will not burn 0

52 Health Hazard - Blue (Deadly) Materials which on very short exposure could cause death or major residual injury even though prompt medical treatment were given (Deadly) 4

53 Health Hazard - Blue (Extreme Danger) Materials which on short exposure could cause serious temporary or residual injury even though prompt medical treatment were given (Extreme Danger) 3

54 Health Hazard - Blue (Dangerous) Materials which on intense or conditioned exposure could cause temporary incapacitation or possible residual injury unless prompt medical treatment is given (Dangerous) 2

55 Health Hazard - Blue Materials which on exposure could cause irritation but only minor residual injury even if no treatment is given (Slight Hazard) 1

56 Health Hazard - Blue (No Health Hazard) Materials which on exposure under fire conditions would offer no hazard beyond that of ordinary combustible material (No Health Hazard) 0

57 Reactivity - Yellow Materials which in themselves are readily capable of detonation or of explosive decomposition or reaction at normal temperatures and pressures (May Detonate) 4

58 Reactivity - Yellow Materials which in themselves are readily capable of detonation or of explosive reaction but require a strong initiating source or which must be heated under confinement before initiation or which react explosively with water(Explosive) 3

59 Reactivity - Yellow Materials which in themselves are normally unstable and readily undergo violent chemical change but do not detonate (Unstable) Also materials which may react violently with water or which may form potentially explosive mixtures with water (Unstable) 2

60 Reactivity - Yellow (Normally Stable) Materials which in themselves are normally stable, but which can become unstable at elevated temperatures and pressures or which may react with water with some release of energy but not violently (Normally Stable) 1

61 Reactivity - Yellow (Stable) Materials which in themselves are normally stable, even under fire conditions, and which are not reactive with water (Stable) 0

62 CorrosiveOxidizing Properties Specific Hazard - White OX COR

63 Specific Hazard - White Acid ACID Alkali ALK Water Reactive W

64 Specific Hazard - White Radioactive

65

66 “Number” Degree of Hazard 0 = NO HAZARD 1 = SLIGHT HAZARD 2 = MODERATE HAZARD 3 = SERIOUS HAZARD 4 = SEVERE HAZARD

67 The Hazardous Materials Table The Hazardous Materials Table lists materials that the Research and Special Programs Administration has determined: may pose an unreasonable risk to health and safety or property when transported in commerce.

68 The Hazardous Materials Table The Hazardous Materials Table identifies the requirements that apply to each shipment of a hazardous material. The table will help the user identify: –proper classifications, including: hazards class, identification number and packing group (PG) –Label codes –Special provisions –Packaging authorizations –Quantity limitations by air –Vessel stowage requirements

69 Column 1 - Symbols

70

71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

83

84 Column 2 Hazmat Descriptions and Proper Shipping Names Lists those materials designated as hazardous. Use column 2 to find the proper shipping name of the hazardous material to be shipped or the name that most accurately describes the material. Proper shipping names appear in Roman type NOT italics.

85 If the user believes the material is not covered in the table, contact: Office of Hazardous Materials Standards Research and Special Programs Administration U.S. Department of Transportation 400 Seventh Street, S.W. Washington, D.C /

86

87 Column 3 – Hazard Class/Division Designates the hazard class and/or division of each proper shipping name, or the word Forbidden. If Forbidden, the material may not be transported unless diluted, stabilized or incorporated in a device and classed accordingly to the definitions in the Hazardous Materials Regulations

88

89 Column 4 – Identification Numbers Contains the identification numbers assigned to each proper shipping name. a. UN (United Nations) indicates that the material is appropriate for international and domestic transportation. b. NA (North America) indicates that the material is appropriate for domestic and Canadian transport only.

90

91

92 Column 5 – PG (Packing Group) Packing groups indicate the degree of danger the material presents: I.Great Danger II.Medium Danger III.Minor Danger

93

94

95

96

97

98

99

100

101

102

103

104

105

106

107 Shipping Papers Whenever a hazardous material is transported, it’s description must appear on the shipping paper.

108 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 1. If a hazardous material and a non- hazardous material are described on the same shipping paper, the hazardous material must be: a. Listed First, or

109 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 1. If a hazardous material and a non- hazardous material are described on the same shipping paper, the hazardous material must be: a. Listed First, or b. Shown in a contrasting color (highlighted on multi-page form), or

110 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 1. If a hazardous material and a non-hazardous material are described on the same shipping paper, the hazardous material must be: a. Listed First, or b. Shown in a contrasting color (highlighted on multi-page form), or c. Identified with an “X” or “RQ” before the proper shipping name in the column marked “HM”

111 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 2. Entry must be legible and printed in English

112 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 3. Unless specifically authorized or required, the description may not contain codes or abbreviations.

113 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 4. Additional information must follow the basic description

114 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 5. Must contain the name of the shipper.

115 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 6. If more than one page is required, the first page must indicate such for example, ‘page 1 of 4.’

116 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 7. Shipping paper must show an emergency response telephone number. Note: An emergency response telephone number is NOT required for limited quantities and many miscellaneous materials.

117 Shipping Papers The description must adhere to these requirements: 8. Shipping paper must contain shippers certification.

118 Shipping Papers A shipping description must include:  Proper shipping name  Hazard class or division (column 3. Hazardous Materials Table)  Identification number (column 4. Hazardous Materials Table)  Packing group (column 5. Hazardous Materials Table)  Except for empty packagings, the total quantity, including unit of measurement, of the hazardous material.

119 Labeling of a Hazardous Material Hazardous Material Warning Labels are designed and color-coded so that the hazards can be quickly recognized. Warning labels correspond to the placards that must appear on each bulk packaging, freight container, unit load device, transport vehicle, or rail car that contains a hazardous material. The labels must include both the hazards class and the division of hazard, if required, according to the Hazardous Materials Table. Unless excepted, all material packages must be labeled.

120 Labeling of a Hazardous Material Warning label codes can be found in column 6 of the Hazardous Materials Table. Use the Label Substitution Table to identify the label name for the codes(s) listed in Column 6. The first code listed is the primary hazard of the material Additional cods indicate subsidiary hazoard(s).

121 PERFORMANCE ORIENTED PACKAGING The proper packaging of hazardous materials is crucial to the safety of everyone involved in their handling and transport.

122 PERFORMANCE ORIENTED PACKAGING A ‘performance orientated package’ must perform in a safe manner under normal transport conditions. The requirements refer to: bulk and non-bulk packagings New and reused packagings Specifications and non-specification packaging.

123 PERFORMANCE ORIENTED PACKAGING Each hazmat package must be designed and manufactured so that when it is filled to its limits, closed, and under normal transportation conditions: there will be no identifiable release of hazardous materials There will be no reduction in package effectiveness (i.e. impact resistance, strength) due to variations in temperature There will be no mixture of gases/vapors in the package that could reduce package effectiveness.

124 PERFORMANCE ORIENTED PACKAGING Packagings cannot be used for hazardous material transportation unless they: a. Meet the above requirements b. Are properly marked with ID numbers and special requirements c. Are tested and approved prior to use d. Have a manufacturer’s marke on each package.

125 Proper Loading and Storage Techniques The responsibility for complying with the provision for loading, storage, and transportation of hazardous material generally lies with the carrier. Specific information on loading and storing hazardous material containers for all modes of transportation is located in the Hazardous Materials Regulations Part 177, Carriage by Public Highway, Subpart B: Loading and unloading; specifies loading and storing requirements for motor vehicles.

126 Proper Loading and Storage Techniques Certain hazardous materials cannot be carried on the same load. For example, cyanides or cyanide mixtures cannot be transported with acids. A Segregation Table provides a reference for segregating certain hazardous materials.

127 Proper Placarding Hazmat placards are similar to the shape, color and design of hazmat warning labels. They serve the following functions: To alert the public to the potential dangers of hazardous materials To guide emergency personnel in their actions during a hazmat incident.

128 Proper Placarding Unless excepted, each bulk packaging, freight container, unit load device, transport vehicle or rail car containing any quantity of a hazardous material must be placarded on each side and each end with the placards specified in Part 172. Subpart F.

129 Dealing with a Hazmat Emergency Knowing how to respond to an hazmat emergency is crucial. At a minimum this section refers to having emergency response information available at all times during the handling and transportation of a hazardous material.

130 Dealing with a Hazmat Emergency This information must include: The basic description and technical name of the hazardous material Immediate hazards to health Risks of fire and exposure Immediate precautions to be taken in the event of an incident/accident initial methods for handling spills or leaks in the absence of fire preliminary first and measures an emergency response phone number

131 Dealing with a Hazmat Emergency These items must be printed in English and available away from the package containing the hazardous materials, for example on the shipping paper, the North American Emergency Response Guide book, or Material Safety Data Sheets.


Download ppt "Hazard Communication and General Awareness. General Awareness – Two Key Definitions: Hazmat Employer A company/person who utilizes one or more employees."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google