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1.THE PAPER: Is the writer’s name, date, draft #, and period n number on the paper and IS IT LEGIBLE ENOUGH TO READ? If not, STOP. DO NOT move further.

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Presentation on theme: "1.THE PAPER: Is the writer’s name, date, draft #, and period n number on the paper and IS IT LEGIBLE ENOUGH TO READ? If not, STOP. DO NOT move further."— Presentation transcript:

1 1.THE PAPER: Is the writer’s name, date, draft #, and period n number on the paper and IS IT LEGIBLE ENOUGH TO READ? If not, STOP. DO NOT move further to evaluate without it ! 2.Writer selected a TOPIC appropriate to an 8 th grader 3.Paper examined one topic THOROUGHLY, demonstrating that writer understood topic 4.Paper properly expands that one topic while STICKING TO IT 5.Paper is ORGANIZED it in a logical manner (thesis\outline structure) 6.Paper offers EFFECTIVE support (body paragraphs) 7.Writer offered enough credible EVIDENCE to back up “support” 8.Supporting points work together effectively (COHESIVENESS) 9.There are TRANSITIONS between them to create a smooth flow from point to point (FLUENCY) 10.Paper maintains a formal STYLE (both in using the 3 rd person narrative instead of first person)and in the words chosen, including no slang or unexplained subject-specific terms) 11.WORDS were used effectively, including (at least) 6 higher level vocabulary words 12.Literary ELEMENTS\TECHNIQUES were used (at least 6 - metaphor, simile, irony, idioms, personification, hyperbole, sound devices like onomatopoeia, rhyme, alliteration, etc.) 13.Essay cites any information that is NOT STUDENT ‘s OWN WORDS (3-6 citations) 14.Concluding paragraph SUMMARIZE the thesis 15.Concluding paragraph refreshes the reader’s mind as to topic 16.Paper sticks to the topic and does not wander 17.Paper is of a length appropriate to an 8th grader’s capability (3pgs typed \ 6 cursive) \ 8 slides) 18.Author now has a work not only to be proud of, but one that is a good example of a solid paper that can be used as a ‘model’ paper later ___________________________________________________________________ 19.Essay was written over the course of time (not as a single sitting essay) 20.Author explored different options before settling on the focus of the essay’s topic 21.Author came up with own questions that directed the research 22.Author had time to reflect on the topic being explored.Before outline. Before Dr3. 23.Author researched using written\published texts 24.Author research using media and respected source web sites 25.Did student properly cite IN THE BIBLIOGRAPHY any information that is NOT STUDENT AUTHOR’s \ i.e. “borrowed”? 26.Did student have peers edit paper? 27.Did student have adults edit paper? 28.Did author use legible cursive AND technology (Word or PPT) on at least FINAL DRAFT? 29.Author noted patterns that emerged in exploring your essay topic (aspects of the topic author discovered interesting) or other items within the same era 30.Author used this list of expectations (rubric) by which to judge the effectiveness of the paper Student papers will be judged on the following “National Common Core Standards” The first 18 points reflect the PRODUCT and the last 12 represent the PROCESS. Out of 30 possible points, you must score at least a 25 to meet each of the teachers’ requirements. The stars represent tougher concepts for most students. They may have to ask for more help. It’s available. Score: 30 Highlight in YELLOW Highlight in GREEN Highlight in BLUE Underline in RED Highlight the following in EVERY draft EXCEPT the final draft that is to be to be submitted THE PROCESS: use the questions below to guide a “process paper” if you have to have one. These questions force a student to look at HOW the paper was achieved. Student editor: write “C\B” and your name Write name of student author and date evaluated here Highlight all forms of parallelism in pink

2 1.THE PAPER: Is the writer’s name, date, draft #, and period number on the paper and IS IT LEGIBLE ENOUGH TO READ?name, date, draft #, and period If not, STOP. DO NOT move further to evaluate without it ! 2.Did the writer select a TOPIC appropriate to an 8 th grader?TOPIC appropriate 3.Does this paper examine one topic THOROUGHLY, demonstrating that writer understood topic?THOROUGHLY 4.Does this paper properly expand that one topic while STICKING TO IT?expand 5.Is this paper ORGANIZED it in a logical manner? (thesis\outline structure\parallelism)ORGANIZED 6.Does this paper offer EFFECTIVE support (body paragraphs)?EFFECTIVE support 7.Did writer offer enough credible EVIDENCE to back up “support”?credible EVIDENCE 8.Do supporting points work together effectively? (COHESIVENESS)COHESIVENESS) 9.Are there TRANSITIONS between them to create a smooth flow from point to point? (FLUENCY)TRANSITIONS 10.Does the paper maintain a formal STYLE (both in using the 3 rd person narrative instead of first person)and in the words chosen, including no slang or unexplained subject-specific terms)?formal STYLE 11.Were WORDS used effectively, including (at least) 6 higher level vocabulary words?WORDS 12.Were (at least) 6 literary ELEMENTS\TECHNIQUES used (metaphor, simile, irony, idioms, personification, hyperbole, sound devices like onomatopoeia, rhyme, alliteration, etc.)?LEMENTS\TECHNIQUES sound devices 13.Does essay cite any information that is NOT STUDENT ‘s OWN WORDS (3-6 citations)?cite 14.Does concluding paragraph SUMMARIZE using the thesis points?SUMMARIZE using the thesis points 15.Does concluding paragraph refresh the reader’s mind as to topic?concluding 16.Does this paper stick to the topic and not wander?stick to the topic 17.Is paper of a length appropriate to an 8th grader’s capability? (3pgs typed \ 6 cursive) \ 8 slides) 18.Does author now have a work not only to be proud of, but one that is a good example of a solid paper that can be used as a ‘model’ paper later? ___________________________________________________________________ 19.Was this essay written over the course of time (or as a single sitting essay)? 20.Did author explore different options before settling on the focus of the essay’s topic? 21.Did author come up with own questions that directed the research? 22.Did author have time to reflect on the topic being explored? Before outline? Before Dr3? 23.Did author research using written\published texts? 24.Did author research using respected sources? Interviews (expert or man on the street)? Web sites? (How could author tell they were considered “respected” sources?) 25.Did student properly cite IN THE BIBLIOGRAPHY any information that is NOT STUDENT AUTHOR’s \ i.e. “borrowed”? 26.Did student have peers edit paper? 27.Did student have adults edit paper? 28.Did author use legible cursive AND technology (Word or PPT) on at least FINAL DRAFT? 29.Notes to student author: Did you notice any patterns emerge in exploring your essay topic (aspects of the topic you discovered interesting) or other items within the same era?patterns 30.Did you use this list of expectations (rubric) by which to judge the effectiveness of your paper?rubric) THE PROCESS: use the questions below to guide a “process paper” if you have to have one. These questions force a student to look at HOW the paper was achieved. PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE click on any hyperlink to find more information

3 Research* BOOKS – INFORMATION SPECIFIC LIKE THE DK BOOK ON “INVENTIONS” – ENCYCLOPEDIAS – ENCYCLOPEDIC DICTIONARIES – THESAURUS OR EVEN A RHYMING DICTIONARY (improve the product) MAGAZINES – INFORMATION SPECIFIC MAGAZINES LIKE “Computing Today” or “Mac World.” 1 st person INTERVIEWS – ex: INTERVIEW TONY CANDIA FROM FRITO LAY AS TO THE ROBOTS THAT RUN THEIR WAREHOUSE – Ex: INTERVIEW JOSE ARREDONDO FROM FAMILY MOTORS OR JIM BURKE IF YOU ARE WORKING ON THE INVENTION OF THE CAR WEB SITES (CITE THE SITE!) – MAKE SURE THEY ARE RELIABLE, FROM RELIABLE ORGANIZATIONS LIKE.gov, OR Encarta, National Geographic, Popular Mechanics, or Tech Museum San Jose, Science Museum Los Angeles, or Exploratorium San Francisco, etc. MEDIA: – DVD, VHS, California Streaming, YouTube, TeacherTube, Captured with camera REMEMBER, WHEREVER YOU GO, WRITE DOWN SOME OF THE BASIC INFO YOU FIND AS YOU GO – IT IS NEEDED: – WHERE DID YOU GET THE INFO (ADDRESS OR TITLE)? – WHO SPONSORED IT? (PUBLISHER OR ORGANIZATION) – WHAT DATE WAS IT PUBLISHED (OR “LAST UPDATED”)? – VOLUME, ISSUE NUMBER? – WHO WAS THE AUTHOR? – DID THAT BOOK\SITE “REFERENCE” ANYONE ELSE? – THE BIG QUESTION…WHAT DID YOU GET FROM THIS SOURCE THAT YOU FOUND IMPORTANT ENOUGH TO INCLUDE IN YOUR PAPER? *THIS INFO WILL NOT ONLY GO INTO YOUR BIBLIOGRAPHY, BUT THE STEPS YOU WENT THROUGH TO GET THIS INFO WILL GO INTO YOUR PROCESS PAPER FOR FOLGER. How can adults help students fulfill their assignment? PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

4 Specific Resources The Encyclopedic Dictionary of Cultural Literacy (it has one paragraph passages on anything of value to the (American) human knowledge. Each paragraph then contains words in all caps that will lead you to more information on that aspect of the info – like a paper “hyperlink”). Every home should buy a copy of this book – it is THAT useful. DK Eyewitness books Popular Mechanics magazines (this magazine series has carried almost every “new” technology since at least the 50’s… hint hint hint, since the original date of your invention, perhaps? Find older copies in public and college campus libraries. You can use this website to help you create a bibliography (especially useful for online sources needing to be cited). (an online source for every electronic dictionary that contains the word you type in). Wikipedia (many teachers will not accept this site, however, at the bottom of the page is a list of “references” – where they got THEIR info…follow these to reach published sources of info. offers many different reference “books” available online. Just look under the “search” drop down menu. According to DK Eyewitness books, the following are recommended sites to visit for more information on inventions: (for timelines and an A-Z listing of inventions for explanations, history of for the Smithsonian site dedicated to the lives of the inventors (updated to : as of 1\31\12) And for the Tech Museum, San Jose (a.k.a. The Silicon Valley)http://www.thetech.org You can go online to any of the channels that specialize in history and choose from a wide variety of online videos they may have on the subject you are researching. Don’t forget, you have to listen closely for the facts, be willing to back it up and listen to it again, and do not forget to properly cite all the info you can (including name of show and even host). These channels include: Discovery Channel (Mythbusters) History Channel (From tactical to practical, Histories Mysteries, Modern Marvels, Engineering Disasters, and more) PBS – History Detectives PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

5 #1: NDP# Name: First name (or initial) plus FULL LAST NAME Date of each draft Period number DRAFT # on EACH draft (and please note, these are drafts, NOT merely copies – we have photo copies for that. Drafts should show obvious editing and improvement) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

6 #2: Topic Topic being discussed in any other of the core classes Topic resulting from something read in literature Topic from current event (pending teacher’s approval) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

7 #3: Thoroughly The past of the topic The impact of the topic The future of the topic Any controversies involving the topic From a wide variety of sources Look into every corner TO THE GRADE LEVEL ABILITY and MOTIVATION OF THE STUDENT PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

8 #4: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

9 #5: Organized Intro uses S.T.A.R.T. points (at least Statement and Thesis) Thesis contains position and 2-3 support points that will become the body paragraphs (parallelism) Each of the following body paragraphs addresses one of those support points (parallelism) Each topic sentence of the supporting paragraphs uses similar wording (parallelism) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

10 #6: Support Is there one paragraph for each of the thesis points? (parallelism) Is each paragraph started with a similar topic sentence – using the key word(s) for that one point? (parallelism) Does each paragraph really address just that one point? Does each paragraph provide evidence to back up the point? evidence PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

11 #7: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

12 #8: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

13 #9: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

14 #10: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

15 #11: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

16 #12: Elements “Literary Devices \ Techniques” like: Metaphors: my love is a rose Similes: my love is LIKE a rose Hyperbole: I love you to the moon and back and beyond. Sound Devices like: Onomatopoeia Alliteration: my magnificent love lifts my heart (mmm, ll) Rhyme PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

17 #13: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

18 #14: Summarize A “summary” is a BRIEF overview of the highest points of an article, essay, or story. In the case of a paper, the THESIS provides the “highlights” to include in the summary. Basically, the concluding paragraph should START with a rephrase of the THESIS PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

19 #15: Conclusion Intro moves from general to specific with a Statement in the first line and the thesis in the last line. The conclusion is the opposite, taking the thesis points first then rephrasing the opening statement So, what you are looking for, then, is the last line should rephrase opening statement (or at the least use key words from it) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

20 #16: On Topic If an author “sticks to the topic,” he or she may draw comparisons to other items for illustrative purposes, but must redirect the flow of the text BACK to the topic fairly quickly. “Birdwalking” is where an author distracts himself by making a comparison to an unlike item and then expanding on THE COMPARED ITEM. PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

21 #17: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

22 #18: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

23 #19 : Time “…over the course of time” means The amount of time a student has to complete a writing should be reflected in the quality of the turned in draft – 45 mins\1 hr (one draft, perhaps a brainstorm) – 2-4 hours (brainstorm, outline, draft, perhaps second draft) – Overnight (brainstorm, outline, draft, edit, revision, typed up) – Over the course of days (all of the above plus research) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

24 #20 : Options “Explore different options” means: Did the student have a choice in topic (efficacy)? Did the student have a choice in which direction the essay would focus on an assigned topic? Did the student recognize that the topic given HAD different aspects to explore and \ or focus on? Did student just do as asked, nothing more? PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

25 #21: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

26 #22 : Reflect “Time to reflect” means From assignment date to finished date, was there opportunity to research a little, think on it a little, add research, learn, think about, argue with findings, research more, agree with findings, want to find out more…etc.,. PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

27 #23: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

28 #24: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

29 #25: Evidence Can “see” Details, imagery, and other bits that help the reader “see” the action, or event. Valid evidence: information from valid sources: published books, reputable on-line sites, first person interview (the student writer interviewed someone as an “expert” and “man on the street”) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

30 #26 : Peer Edits Peers look for Name, date, per# and draft # Indentation Capitalization Basic spelling No contractions (can’t, didn’t, would’ve – or “would of”) “big words” The fact that “citations” were included (may not catch if they were done properly or not) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

31 #27 : Experienced Adults and advanced students can look for Proper spelling Included vocabulary Metaphors, idioms, onomatopoeia, rhyme, simile, hyperbole, alliteration Proper citation style Legibility Thesis Stick to topic Areas to help the student improve PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE Editors

32 #28 : Publish Producing a writing should include: Handwritten drafts (both the quick, informal drafts AND a finished product in a legible cursive equal to that of what “professional adults” might expect of the student writer. Technology driven drafts, either preparing them for presentation, , or publication (meaning basic, expected formatting such as 1” margins, title, 12 pt font, etc.). PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

33 #29 : Patterns Often while researching, or being one of many students assigned to research, one will notice a “pattern” form. Examples might be like: – (TECHNOLOGY) the bigger the capacity for data storage, the smaller the device – (TRANSPORTATION) development was slow until the combustion engine – quickly followed by the turbine engine…now the sky is the limit!) – (MEDICINE) the better the dental health, the better the heart health PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE

34 #30: Rubric Did the student USE this list of expectations to deliberately add to the essay \ improve it? Three ways to know for sure: Look for other rubrics stapled to previous drafts Look for color highlights on citation, vocabulary, etc. on drafts Ask the student author (caution: author may lie to increase grade) PREVIOUS SLIDE LAST SLIDE VISITED NEXT SLIDE INDEX SLIDE


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