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USC Sumter Office of Advisement and Counseling Administration Building, Rm. 101 On-line Note taker Training.

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Presentation on theme: "USC Sumter Office of Advisement and Counseling Administration Building, Rm. 101 On-line Note taker Training."— Presentation transcript:

1 USC Sumter Office of Advisement and Counseling Administration Building, Rm. 101 On-line Note taker Training

2 Welcome to the staff of the Advisement and Counseling Center at the University of South Carolina Sumter. Thank you for agreeing to be a note taker. We are happy you have chosen to work with us, and we hope you enjoy your experience here. Note taker provision is a mandated support service provided by Advisement and Counseling to students with documented disabilities.

3 These disabilities include students who are deaf or hard of hearing, students who are blind or have low vision, they may have a learning disability or Attention Deficit Disorder, or any other documented disability. Note takers are hired on a semester basis. Persons providing note-taking services must be responsible, reliable, and prompt.

4 On the following pages you will find a tutorial about things we want our note takers to know and you will learn and review some key note taking skills. You may want to consider printing this tutorial for easy reference.

5 Confidentiality Confidentiality is an important aspect of working with students with disabilities. Students with disabilities are protected under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (sometimes referred to as FERPA or the Buckley Amendment.)Confidentiality is an important aspect of working with students with disabilities. Students with disabilities are protected under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, and the Family Education Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (sometimes referred to as FERPA or the Buckley Amendment.) It is your responsibility as a note taker for a student with a disability to protect the privacy of the student, including any former students. Any information you obtain, see, observe, hear, or become aware of is considered confidential. You should NOT discuss your reason for being in the class with any other person. The unauthorized release of information is strictly prohibited and will lead to dismissal upon the first offense. You will sign a confidentiality statement when you are hired and a breach of this trust is an extremely serious offense.It is your responsibility as a note taker for a student with a disability to protect the privacy of the student, including any former students. Any information you obtain, see, observe, hear, or become aware of is considered confidential. You should NOT discuss your reason for being in the class with any other person. The unauthorized release of information is strictly prohibited and will lead to dismissal upon the first offense. You will sign a confidentiality statement when you are hired and a breach of this trust is an extremely serious offense. (Oberline On line, 1996)

6 Do not disclose who you are taking notes for. Even if a professor asks you for the student’s name, simply tell them that you cannot disclose that information. The professor should have received a letter from the student explaining any accommodations they are receiving. If they have any further questions please refer them to our office.Do not disclose who you are taking notes for. Even if a professor asks you for the student’s name, simply tell them that you cannot disclose that information. The professor should have received a letter from the student explaining any accommodations they are receiving. If they have any further questions please refer them to our office. The Advisement and Counseling Office is prohibited by law from providing you with the student’s phone number or e-mail address; however, the student will be provided with your number or e-mail address upon their request and may contact you if they wish. If the student does not want to contact you, then the Director of Advisement and Counseling will handle any communication between you and the student. If you have any concerns or questions, contact her at 803-938-3800 or in Administration Building Rm. 101. You should NOT approach the student.The Advisement and Counseling Office is prohibited by law from providing you with the student’s phone number or e-mail address; however, the student will be provided with your number or e-mail address upon their request and may contact you if they wish. If the student does not want to contact you, then the Director of Advisement and Counseling will handle any communication between you and the student. If you have any concerns or questions, contact her at 803-938-3800 or in Administration Building Rm. 101. You should NOT approach the student.

7 Responsibilities Please contact us if there is a change of address, phone number or e-mail. We must be able to reach you if there are any problems.Please contact us if there is a change of address, phone number or e-mail. We must be able to reach you if there are any problems. Arrive on time and stay in class until it is over. You cannot have complete notes if you are not in class from beginning to end. Important information such as exam dates or class cancellations is often provided as the class begins.Arrive on time and stay in class until it is over. You cannot have complete notes if you are not in class from beginning to end. Important information such as exam dates or class cancellations is often provided as the class begins. Your pay check will be mailed to you at the end of the semester for notes that we received.Your pay check will be mailed to you at the end of the semester for notes that we received. Please do not give out this office as your place of employment on job applications or credit card applications.Please do not give out this office as your place of employment on job applications or credit card applications.

8 Note Taker Manual Remember, one or more USC students are counting on your notes to help them succeed in class. Please make your notes as accurate, legible, and complete as possible.Remember, one or more USC students are counting on your notes to help them succeed in class. Please make your notes as accurate, legible, and complete as possible. Arranging for a timely delivery of your notes is also essential. The student must have access to them as soon as possible after the class meets. A few hours of turnaround time is desired.Arranging for a timely delivery of your notes is also essential. The student must have access to them as soon as possible after the class meets. A few hours of turnaround time is desired. You are expected to bring your notes to Advisement and Counseling Office, Adm. Bldg. room 101 within 24 hours of class. If there will be a delay in the delivery of the notes, please stop in or call 803-938-3800 as soon as possible. At the top of your notes please write the class name/numberAt the top of your notes please write the class name/number (ex. SOCY V 101) and put the date that the notes were taken.

9 What if I miss class? It is the responsibility of the note take to make sure you obtain notes for any class that you miss. If you know you are going to miss class due to illness or any other reason, please let the Advisement and Counseling Office, 803-938- 3800, know as soon as possible.It is the responsibility of the note take to make sure you obtain notes for any class that you miss. If you know you are going to miss class due to illness or any other reason, please let the Advisement and Counseling Office, 803-938- 3800, know as soon as possible.

10 Potential Problems If a difficulty occurs within the working relationship, please contact the Advisement and Counseling Office as soon as possible. If the student you are taking notes for has initiated a working relationship, then discuss the problem with the student. This will prevent a difficulty from “mushrooming” into a major problem. If a difficulty cannot be resolved in a relatively short time, all parties involved should jointly seek guidance from the Director of Advisement and Counseling.If a difficulty occurs within the working relationship, please contact the Advisement and Counseling Office as soon as possible. If the student you are taking notes for has initiated a working relationship, then discuss the problem with the student. This will prevent a difficulty from “mushrooming” into a major problem. If a difficulty cannot be resolved in a relatively short time, all parties involved should jointly seek guidance from the Director of Advisement and Counseling.

11 How to be a better note taker Be prepared for class. If there is an assigned reading then it is best to have completed that reading prior to class. It is likely that much of the class notes and discussion will be based on the assignment. If the professor refers to a page in the textbook write it down; it may be helpful later on.Be prepared for class. If there is an assigned reading then it is best to have completed that reading prior to class. It is likely that much of the class notes and discussion will be based on the assignment. If the professor refers to a page in the textbook write it down; it may be helpful later on. You may want to consider writing down some main points before the lecture to help you follow along, this can help you keep from feeling overwhelmed when you are being hit with so much information. (Marshall & Rowland, 1998, pp. 152-153).You may want to consider writing down some main points before the lecture to help you follow along, this can help you keep from feeling overwhelmed when you are being hit with so much information. (Marshall & Rowland, 1998, pp. 152-153). It is also important to make sure you bring enough paper and something to write with.It is also important to make sure you bring enough paper and something to write with.

12 Remain objective. Keep your opinions out of the notes.Remain objective. Keep your opinions out of the notes. Use only one side of the paper and skip lines. The student may use the other side for adding his/her own notes. If there is extra space on the page then the notes will be easier to read and there will be space for information you may want to add later. The student is using your notes in combination with his/her own.Use only one side of the paper and skip lines. The student may use the other side for adding his/her own notes. If there is extra space on the page then the notes will be easier to read and there will be space for information you may want to add later. The student is using your notes in combination with his/her own. Number, title, and date each page. This will help our students, and you, keep track of the notes. Students often receive notes for more than one class at a time.Number, title, and date each page. This will help our students, and you, keep track of the notes. Students often receive notes for more than one class at a time. Keep your notebook organized. Throw out pages full of doodles and other things that could potentially create a mess. Use dividers, sticky notes, and sheet protectors to help organize your notebook.Keep your notebook organized. Throw out pages full of doodles and other things that could potentially create a mess. Use dividers, sticky notes, and sheet protectors to help organize your notebook.

13 Write legibly and use correct spelling.Write legibly and use correct spelling. Use key words and short phrases.Use key words and short phrases. Use abbreviations for words that are used again and again or are common. For example, rather than write out the word “government” try just writing “govt.” Also for long words and phrases you may want to write it out the first time and then use a shortened version each time thereafter. For example, rather than use the words “Einstein’s Theory of Relativity” just write “ETR.”Use abbreviations for words that are used again and again or are common. For example, rather than write out the word “government” try just writing “govt.” Also for long words and phrases you may want to write it out the first time and then use a shortened version each time thereafter. For example, rather than use the words “Einstein’s Theory of Relativity” just write “ETR.” Don’t try to write down everything the professor says. This is not possible, and if you can do it, then it is too much information. Try to write down the big ideas. Listen for key words, such as facts, connections and main ideas. “It is impossible to reproduce most of the content of a lecture exactly and very rarely do you want as much detail as this. Instead your notes should be your consciously selected version of the material offered, so that you make notes rather than take them.” (Marshall & Rowland, p. 154).Don’t try to write down everything the professor says. This is not possible, and if you can do it, then it is too much information. Try to write down the big ideas. Listen for key words, such as facts, connections and main ideas. “It is impossible to reproduce most of the content of a lecture exactly and very rarely do you want as much detail as this. Instead your notes should be your consciously selected version of the material offered, so that you make notes rather than take them.” (Marshall & Rowland, p. 154).

14 Abbreviations and Symbols Use beginning letters of words or phrases, such as:Use beginning letters of words or phrases, such as: –“without” = w/o –“overdose” = OD –“sing on” = S.O. –“as soon as possible” = ASAP Use beginning syllables, such asUse beginning syllables, such as –“anthropology” = anthro –“demonstration” =demo –“approximately”=approx Use common characters and symbols, such as:Use common characters and symbols, such as: –? = “I don’t understand” –@ = “at” –  = “linked to or causes” –* or ! = “important” Use the beginning and end of words, such as: –“Continued” = cont’d –“additional” = add’l Remove vowels, such as: –“explosion” = explsn –“check” = chck –“notebook” = notebk Use mathematical symbol, such as: –>< represent “greater than or less than” –= “equal to” –# “number” –~ “approximately” –+ for “and” (Lipsky, 2004, p. 54-55).

15 Selective Listening Focusing on what is and is not important and what should and should not be written down.Focusing on what is and is not important and what should and should not be written down. Think about the following things as you listen to the lecture:Think about the following things as you listen to the lecture: –What is the topic? –What do I need to know about the topic? –Why is this topic important? –What is an example of this topic? –How did this event or procedure come about? (Lipsky, 2004, p. 53).

16 Verbal and Nonverbal Cues Verbal Cues – These are things the professor says that shows that the information needs to be written down. Things such as:Verbal Cues – These are things the professor says that shows that the information needs to be written down. Things such as: –Repeating information –Pausing or slowing down –Talking louder Nonverbal Cues – Things the professors does to show that information needs to be written down. Things such as: –Using hand gestures –Pointing to words on the board –Looking at students’ notes to make sure they are writing things down correctly (Lipsky, 2004, p. 53).

17 Listen for Key Words AdvantagesAdvantages BenefitsBenefits CausesCauses CharacteristicsCharacteristics ConclusionsConclusions DisadvantagesDisadvantages EffectsEffects FactorsFactors Findings Functions Kinds of Methods Parts Principles Purposes Reasons (Wong, 2003, p. 270) RulesRules SolutionsSolutions StagesStages StepsSteps TechniquesTechniques Types ofTypes of UsesUses WaysWays

18 Listen for Terminology X means…X means… X is also called…X is also called… X is defined as…X is defined as… X, also referred to as…X, also referred to as… The definition of X is…The definition of X is… X, also known as…X, also known as… (Wong, 2003, p. 270)

19 Other things to listen for: Details: dates, names, facts, statistics, & definitionsDetails: dates, names, facts, statistics, & definitions Ordinals: first, second, third, next, also, another, in addition, last, finallyOrdinals: first, second, third, next, also, another, in addition, last, finally Examples: Examples are used to make the information more interesting, so include a reference (you don’t need to retell the whole story) to the example in your notes to help trigger your memoryExamples: Examples are used to make the information more interesting, so include a reference (you don’t need to retell the whole story) to the example in your notes to help trigger your memory Leave it blank when you are unsure. Meet with the professor or other students to fill in missing information. It is a good idea to find a buddy in class; should one of you be absent you can rely on each other for any missed material or to help fill in missing information when something is unclear.Leave it blank when you are unsure. Meet with the professor or other students to fill in missing information. It is a good idea to find a buddy in class; should one of you be absent you can rely on each other for any missed material or to help fill in missing information when something is unclear. (Wong, 2003, p. 271)

20 Sit in the front of the class. This will help you to concentrate on the professor and ignore distractions during class.Sit in the front of the class. This will help you to concentrate on the professor and ignore distractions during class. Use underlining and *asterisks* to signify important information such as test and assignment dates, class announcements, or key ideas. Highlighters are fine, but the colors do not come out when you are making copies of your notes.Use underlining and *asterisks* to signify important information such as test and assignment dates, class announcements, or key ideas. Highlighters are fine, but the colors do not come out when you are making copies of your notes. Use mind maps, things such as Venn diagrams and flow charts. It is also fine to draw pictures. Make up your own type of chart. Whatever helps you to make the material make sense.Use mind maps, things such as Venn diagrams and flow charts. It is also fine to draw pictures. Make up your own type of chart. Whatever helps you to make the material make sense.

21 Flow Chart – a flow chart uses boxes with text, graphics, and symbols to show operations, directions, organization, data, and the different stages of a process. This is great for science or history classes.Flow Chart – a flow chart uses boxes with text, graphics, and symbols to show operations, directions, organization, data, and the different stages of a process. This is great for science or history classes. (The NASA Science Files Homepage, 2004).

22 Venn Diagram – Used to show comparisons between two or more things. You can always add another circle to show the similarities and difference between three things. (LD Online, 2005)

23 Types of Notes

24 Paragraph Style Write what you hear and paraphrase Use bullets With each new idea start a new paragraph

25 Outline Style Uses Roman numerals, letters, and numeralsUses Roman numerals, letters, and numerals Each indention is a smaller classificationEach indention is a smaller classification Uses key words and phrasesUses key words and phrases

26 Cornell Style The Cornell system for taking notes is designed to save time but yet be highly efficient. There is no rewriting or retyping of your notes. It is a "DO IT RIGHT IN THE FIRST PLACE" system. First Step – PREPARATION Use a large, loose-leaf notebook. Use only one side of the paper. (you then can lay your notes out to see the direction of a lecture.) Draw a vertical line 2 1/2 inches from the left side of you paper. This is the recall column. Notes will be taken to the right of this margin. Later key words or phrases can be written in the recall column. http://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdyhlp.html

27 Cornell Style Continued Second Step - DURING THE LECTURE Record notes in paragraph form. Capture general ideas, not illustrative ideas. Skip lines to show end of ideas or thoughts. Using abbreviations will save time. Write legibly. Third Step - AFTER THE LECTURE Read through your notes and make it more legible if necessary. Now use the column. Jot down ideas or key words which give you the idea of the lecture. (REDUCE) You will have to reread the lecturer's ideas and reflect in your own words. Cover up the right-hand portion of your notes and recite the general ideas and concepts of the lecture. Overlap your notes showing only recall columns and you have your review.

28 http://lvillage.wsfcs.k12.nc.us/lv/hsmoun/hp.nsf/HomePages/bbowling

29 The key to taking good notes is finding what works best for you. You should use these hints and techniques to help you find a note taking method that makes sense to you and the way you learn. It is also important to PRACTICE- PRACTICE-PRACTICE!

30 What if my professor puts the notes on Blackboard? Today, you will find many professors that put their notes on Blackboard. That does not mean that you should tune out and take nap!Today, you will find many professors that put their notes on Blackboard. That does not mean that you should tune out and take nap! Make sure you have printed out a copy of the notes and bring them to class with you.Make sure you have printed out a copy of the notes and bring them to class with you. This is a great chance to focus on what is being said and supplement the notes with key points, examples, and main ideas.This is a great chance to focus on what is being said and supplement the notes with key points, examples, and main ideas. Use the professors verbal and non-verbal cues to help you decided what and where to supplement the notes.Use the professors verbal and non-verbal cues to help you decided what and where to supplement the notes. Use your system of abbreviations and symbols to point out important material.Use your system of abbreviations and symbols to point out important material. (Lipsky, 2004, p. 59).

31 Sources Bowlings English Page. Retrieved on June 8, 2005 from http://lvillage.wsfcs.k12.nc.us/lv/hsmoun/hp.nsf/HomePages/bbowling http://lvillage.wsfcs.k12.nc.us/lv/hsmoun/hp.nsf/HomePages/bbowling Lipsky, S. (2004). The essential ingredients: College study. New Jersey: Pearson. LD Online. (2005) Teaching strategies. Retrieved on June 6, 2005 from http://www.ldonline.org/images/ld_indepth/memory_trategies_venn.gif http://www.ldonline.org/images/ld_indepth/memory_trategies_venn.gif Marshall, L. & Rowland, F. (1998). A guide to learning independently (3 rd ed.). Australia: Longman. Oberline On line. (1996) Services for students with disabilities. Retrieved on June 1, 2005 from http://www.oberlin.edu/learning/Confidentialitystudents.htmlhttp://www.oberlin.edu/learning/Confidentialitystudents.html The NASA Science Files Homepage. (2004). Scientific method flowchart. Retrieved on June 6, 2005 from http://whyfiles.larc.nasa.gov/text/kids/Research_Rack/images/scientific_meth od01.gif http://whyfiles.larc.nasa.gov/text/kids/Research_Rack/images/scientific_meth od01.gif Virginia Tech, Cook Counseling Center. Note taking: The cornell system. Retrieved on June 8. 2005 from http://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdyhlp.htmlhttp://www.ucc.vt.edu/stdyhlp.html Wong, L. (2003). Essential study skills (4 th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.Wong, L. (2003). Essential study skills (4 th ed.). Boston: Houghton Mifflin Co.


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