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© 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Healthy Eating at Work WORKSITE WELLNESS PEER GROUP MEETING KELLY KUNKEL EXTENSION.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Healthy Eating at Work WORKSITE WELLNESS PEER GROUP MEETING KELLY KUNKEL EXTENSION."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Healthy Eating at Work WORKSITE WELLNESS PEER GROUP MEETING KELLY KUNKEL EXTENSION EDUCATOR, HEALTH AND NUTRITION JANUARY 14, 2015

2 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. IT’S MORE THAN THE FOOD Eating decisions – how many have you made today?  Average person makes over 227 food related decisions daily  Decisions are impacted by: –Knowledge –Personal situation –Social environment –Physical environment –How food is presented Wansink B, (2007) Environment and Behavior

3 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. FOOD AT THE WORKPLACE  People spend 8 hours a day at work: 50% of waking hours –113 food decision –One meal –Two snacks  Employees can have access to many eating opportunities at work: –Cafeteria, vending –Treats in lunchroom, candy/snack dishes in work areas –Food at meetings and events Which option supports health eating?

4 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. NEW RESEARCH: DECISION FATIGUE  The more choices you make throughout the day, the harder each one becomes for your brain  Consequences: –Reduced will power –Shortcuts like impulsive decisions or avoiding decisions. New York Times, August 17, 2011

5 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HOW MUCH IS TOO MUCH? 100 calories is equal to:  20 minute walk  8 oz. of regular soda  1 small cookie  5 chocolate covered almonds  ¼ commercial muffin  ½ donut

6 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. U.S. CALORIC ENVIRONMENT  More than 3800 calories per person produced annually  More than 2700 per person available for consumption  Average person needs 2000 or fewer calories per day. USDA’s Economic Research Service

7 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. EATING BEHAVIOR  Not only what, but HOW we eat has as much of an impact on health –Mindless eating: lack of attention to fullness cues –Portion size influences how much we eat –“Because its there”: Impulsive eating decisions –Distracted eating – on the run, while working, etc.

8 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. BUSINESS CASE FOR HEALTHY FOODS  Can save money on health care costs, absenteeism  Can reduce the risk of some chronic diseases  Healthy employees are more likely to be at work and performing well  Improved employee morale  Retain key employees and attract new talent

9 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTH COSTS VS. HEALTH CONDITIONS Annual cost per risk factor Depression$2,413 High Glucose$1,450 Overweight$1,194 Stress$1,132 Tobacco$713 High Blood Pressure$650 High Cholesterol$454 Source: Hero Risk-Cost Research: The relationship between modifiable health risks and health care expenditures. Goetzel, et al.

10 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. MAKING THE HEALTHY CHOICE THE EASY CHOICE  Promoting a healthy food environment as part of comprehensive WW program supports workers in their environment.  What is healthy eating?  USDA My Plate

11 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. STRATEGIES THAT WORK: PRICING  Vending study –Reductions of 10%, 25% and 50% on LF snacks increase purchases by 9%, 39% and 93%  Cafeteria study –Increased cost of regular soft drinks by 35% decreased purchases by 26% French SA (2001) American Journal of Public Health Block JP (2010) American Journal of Public Health

12 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. STRATEGIES THAT WORK: PLACEMENT  Marketing principals – eye level, clear view  Point of Purchase (POP) strategies  Keep messages short and simple  Focus on convenience, taste, effect of healthy food

13 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. MORE STRATEGIES THAT WORK  Policies that encourage healthy foods at meetings and events  Limit treats in common areas, replace with healthy options  Encourage people to share healthy foods in their work space and at potlucks  Include access to a dietician as part of your health benefits

14 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. WHAT WE’VE LEARNED  Its not easy to change peoples food choices  Comprehensive wellness programs get better results  Employee involvement is critical  Management support is critical  Creating a company culture of health is a game changer.

15 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTHY EATING AT WORK: WHAT IT TAKES A Comprehensive Approach: –Supportive environment  Access to healthy food  Space to eat  Encourage healthy foods in work environment –Social support  Raise awareness  Build skills –Policy development  Catering  Vending  Meetings

16 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. GETTING IT DONE  Gather key players and get buy-in  Conduct a workplace assessment: capture the current environment and eating practices  Form a wellness committee  Plan and identify areas for improvement  Consult with experts, hire consultants, review best practice  Put the plan into action: set specific attainable goals  Evaluate efforts  Involve employees and leadership

17 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. KEEPING IT GOING  Solicit employee feedback –Polls –Surveys –Taste testing –Focus groups  Host healthy foods events –Seasonal cooking challenge, potluck salad bars, –Be a CSA drop site –Offer a farmers market

18 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SOCIAL SUPPORT: RAISING AWARENESS Activities that give employees the information they need to make healthy food choices  Examples: –Company newsletter –Post tips on bulletin boards, pay stubs, etc. –Events: contests, challenges, brown bag presentations –Health screenings

19 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SOCIAL SUPPORT: SKILL BUILDING Activities that teach employees how to get actively involved in changing eating behaviors  Examples: –Sharing recipes –Cooking demonstrations –Label reading educational activities –Weight loss programs –Self-screening questionnaires

20 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. SUPPORTIVE ENVIRONMENT The surroundings and conditions which foster healthy eating  Examples: –Increase availability of F & V –Make healthy choices convenient and competitively priced –Reduce portion sizes –Modify cafeteria recipes to improve nutritional value

21 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. POLICY DEVELOPMENT Specific guidelines that support healthy eating in the workplace  Examples of what a policy can do: –Clarify roles of employers and employees –Demonstrate commitment to employee health –Provide accurate and consistent messaging –Increase availability of healthy foods –Decrease availability of unhealthy foods –Positive role modeling –Support making healthy choices

22 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HUMAN RESOURCES: BEHAVIORAL SUPPORTS  Examples: –Assure employees have enough time to eat –Assure employees have a clean and attractive eating environment away from their work space –Nutrition counseling is covered by insurance

23 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. LET’S GET ENERGIZED

24 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTHY EATING MEETINGS & EVENTS Healthy choices area always available. reduce the quantity/size of unhealthy items and increase healthy choices Consider the current food defaults. vegetable sides whole grains healthy soups Downsize portions. smaller plates half portions 24 ENVIRONMENT

25 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTHY EATING VENDING  Engage internal vendor relations team  Vendor is a part of the process  Survey employees  Identify desired state –increase availability of healthy products. –offer smaller portions.  Quality assurance –keep machines consistently stocked with healthier choices. 25 ENVIRONMENT

26 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTHY EATING HEALTHY SNACK STATION Location that contains refrigerated and dry goods purchased on-your-honor  Steps to establish a healthy snack station –survey employees –location and storage –display and presentation –management of station –financial considerations 26 ENVIRONMENT

27 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. POLICIES: HEALTHY FOODS Ideal healthy foods policies/guidelines include: Meetings and events include healthy options when food and beverages are served Snack stations contain only healthy foods and beverages Vending maintains a minimum percentage of healthy foods and beverages (e.g., 50% of food) healthy options are priced lower visible product labels healthy options labeled with “healthier choice” sticker 27 POLICY

28 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTHY EATING MEETINGS & EVENTS  Contact local caterers to inquire about healthy choices –breakfast, lunch, events –hot and cold –meet dietary requests  Compile a healthy catering guidebook that outlines healthy options. Reference for administrative staff when placing orders.  Social event to taste test foods [include healthy vending options] 28 SYSTEMS and SOCIAL SUPPORT

29 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. HEALTHY EATING P SS S E Vending Healthy snack station creation Cafeteria improvements Meetings and events Policy that sustains the improvements RFP services for vending Quality assurance practices for vending Catering guide Management of healthy snack station Labeling and signage Managers are trained on how to support all elements Taste testing Employee survey Lunch and learns 29

30 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.

31 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. BODIES/MOVE-MORE/HEALTHY-AND-FIT-ON-THE-GO/

32 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.  A roadmap to healthy, affordable, and safe food for all Minnesotans.  Is supported by SHIP at MDH with funding from the CDC and the Center for Prevention at BCBSMN, with leadership support from the UM Healthy Foods, Healthy Lives Institute. Minnesota Food Charter 101

33 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved.  Why a Food Charter? In recent decades, diet-related health issues have surged – presenting costly, long-term challenges to Minnesota’s prosperity. Unequal access to healthy food results in a lower bottom line – from worker productivity to healthcare costs. Minnesota Food Charter 101 continued

34 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. Creating a plan for a healthier MN 1)February – October 2013 Public input process 2)November 2013 – January 2014 Ongoing, online town hall forum, open to all 3)January 2014 Regional gatherings 4)January – July 2014 Draft Food Charter document 5)September 2014 Final document completed 6)October 2014 MN Food Charter launches at Food Access Summit and is shared with public Minnesota Food Charter 101 continued

35 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The Food Charter Document What is healthy food? Minnesotans have different ideas about healthy food and what it means to them. It’s important to have a food supply that can meet these diverse needs, definitions and interests. Minnesota Food Charter 101 continued

36 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The Food Charter Document Call to action 1.Share 2.Act 3.Learn Minnesota Food Charter 101 continued

37 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. NEXT STEPS

38 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. RESOURCES Choose MyPlate at: Dietary Guidelines for Americans, 2010 at: PolicyDocument.htmwww.cnpp.usda.gov/DGAS2010- PolicyDocument.htm  CDC worksite wellness tools at:  CDC worksite scorecard at:  Wisconsin worksite wellness toolkit: s%20Resource%20Kit.pdf s%20Resource%20Kit.pdf  Eat Well Work Well at:  SHIP worksite wellness implementation guide at: nessguide pdf nessguide pdf

39 © 2014 Regents of the University of Minnesota. All rights reserved. The University of Minnesota is an equal opportunity educator and employer. This PowerPoint is available in alternative formats upon request. Direct requests to Thank you! Kelly Kunkel (507) or (507)


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