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What’s in your drink? Making Healthier Choices Lesson Developed by: Lisa Franzen-Castle, Assistant Professor and Extension Nutrition Specialist; Carol.

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Presentation on theme: "What’s in your drink? Making Healthier Choices Lesson Developed by: Lisa Franzen-Castle, Assistant Professor and Extension Nutrition Specialist; Carol."— Presentation transcript:

1 What’s in your drink? Making Healthier Choices Lesson Developed by: Lisa Franzen-Castle, Assistant Professor and Extension Nutrition Specialist; Carol J. Schwarz, Extension Educator; and Ranae L. Aspen, Extension Associate

2 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Lesson Goal Learn about beverage choices and ways to select healthy drinks that will benefit you and your family.

3 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Lesson Objectives Evaluate and choose nutritious drinks. Know short- and long-term costs of selecting drinks high in added sugars and/or calories. Make healthy drink choices through goal setting to establish healthier habits. Discover ways to promote healthy drink choices within your community/organization.

4 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Introduction Calories in drinks are not hidden, but many people don't realize how many calories drinks can contribute to their daily intake. Calories from drinks can really add up; however, you have plenty of options for reducing the number of calories in what you drink. This lesson will help you become a savvy drink consumer and provide you with the knowledge to select beverages that taste great and give you the nutrients your body needs.

5 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Nutrition Facts Label The Nutrition Facts label on beverage containers may give the calories for only part of the contents. This example shows the label on a 20-oz. bottle. –As you can see, it lists the number of calories in an 8-oz. serving (100) even though the bottle contains 20 oz. or 2.5 servings.

6 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. How many calories? To figure out how many calories are in the whole bottle, multiply the number of calories in one serving by the number of servings in the bottle (100 x 2.5). The contents of the entire bottle actually contain 250 calories even though what the label calls a "serving" only contains 100.

7 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Check the list to estimate how many calories you typically take in from drinks.

8 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Common Caloric Sweeteners Sweeteners that add calories to beverages go by many names that are not always obvious to anyone looking at the ingredients list. If the sweeteners listed below appear in the ingredients list of your favorite beverage, you are drinking a sugar-sweetened beverage. High-fructose corn syrupSyrup FructoseCorn syrup Fruit juice concentratesSucrose HoneyDextrose Sugar

9 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Figure Your Sugar In this example, there are 44 g of sugar. There is one serving, so simply divide by 4 (there are 4 grams of sugar per teaspoon) and you have 11 teaspoons of sugar.

10 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Imagine Eating 26 Teaspoons of Sugar

11 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Imagine Eating 26 Teaspoons of Sugar One 32-ounce soda

12 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. What Is the Cost? Short-term? Long-term?

13 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Counting Up the Cost How many sugary and/or low-nutrient drinks (e.g., soda pop, sports drinks, and juice [not 100% juice]) did you or your family have last week? _________ What does each drink cost (on average)? __________ Multiply the number of drinks by the cost. __________ How much, on average, does your family spend each year on sugary and/or low-nutrient drinks? (Multiply by 52 weeks) _____________

14 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Counting Up the Cost How many sugary and/or low-nutrient drinks (e.g., soda pop, sports drinks, and juice [not 100% juice]) did you or your family have last week? 14 What does each drink cost (on average)? $2.00 Multiply the number of drinks by the cost. $28.00 How much, on average, does your family spend each year on sugary and/or low-nutrient drinks? (Multiply by 52 weeks)$1,456.00

15 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. WATER

16 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Drink Water Every Day Water is an essential nutrient. Our body is 60% to 75% water. Water regulates body temperature. Water participates in the body’s biochemical reactions. Every day we lose water through sweat, respiration, etc. Source:

17 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Increase Water Availability Keep a water pitcher on the table at meals. Take bottled water when leaving the house. Chill water in the fridge for convenience. Make sugar-added drinks less available.

18 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. The Best Hydration Choice Is Water! Unlike many nutrients, there isn’t a specific daily recommendation for water. Part of the reason is variability in individuals related to the climate in which they live, physical activity, age, state of health, and body size. Under typical circumstances, adults may replenish up to six or eight cups of fluid each day. Source:

19 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. MILK

20 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Low-Fat Milk (Daily Recommendation) Excellent source of calcium to keep bones, teeth, and muscles strong. Source: groups/dairy-amount.html groups/dairy-amount.html Children 2-3 years old2 cups 4-8 years old2 ½ cups Girls 9-13 years old3 cups years old3 cups Boys 9-13 years old3 cups years old3 cups Women years old3 cups years old3 cups 51+ years old3 cups Men years old3 cups years old3 cups 51+ years old3 cups

21 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Why Low-Fat? Whole 165 calories 165 calories 2% 125 calories 125 calories 1% 100 calories 100 calories Fat-Free 85 calories

22 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. 100% FRUIT JUICE

23 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. 100% Fruit Juice 100% fruit and vegetable juice contain vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. If you do consume juice, make sure it is 100% fruit or vegetable juice, and consume it in small amounts. An adult serving size for fruit juice is 4 to 6 fluid ounces, not the 20-ounce bottle you see in vending machines and convenience stores. Source: https://www.extension.org/pages/19892/is-juice-a-good-substitute-for-soft- drinks#.VAdJc6OwT8Uhttps://www.extension.org/pages/19892/is-juice-a-good-substitute-for-soft- drinks#.VAdJc6OwT8U

24 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. 100% Fruit Juice Watch out for drinks that are labeled as “fruit punches," "juice drinks," or "juice cocktails.” Always look for the word “juice” all by itself or “100% juice.” Fruit juice should be the first ingredient listed on the ingredients list. Avoid fruit drinks that contain sugar, corn syrup, or other sweeteners. Source: https://www.extension.org/pages/19892/is-juice-a-good-substitute-for-soft- drinks#.VAdJc6OwT8Uhttps://www.extension.org/pages/19892/is-juice-a-good-substitute-for-soft- drinks#.VAdJc6OwT8U

25 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. COFFEE DRINKS

26 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. High-Calorie Culprits in Unexpected Places Coffee drinks sound innocent enough, but the calories in some of your favorite coffee-shop items may surprise you. Check the website or in-store nutrition information of your favorite coffee shop to find out how many calories are in different menu items. Source:

27 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Tips to Minimize Caloric Damage at the Coffee Shop Make a request. Ask that your drink be made with fat- free or low-fat milk instead of whole milk. Reduce your portion size. Order the smallest size. Forgo the extra flavoring. The flavored syrups, like vanilla or hazelnut, are sugar-sweetened and will add calories to your drink. Skip the whip. Whipped cream adds calories and fat. Get back to basics. Order a plain cup of coffee with fat- free milk and artificial sweetener, or drink it black. Source:

28 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. SPORTS DRINKS

29 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Sports Drinks Sports drinks are beverages that contain nutrients often lost during vigorous activity. They are not meant to be consumed during meals or snacks as a replacement for water or low-fat milk. Overconsumption can lead to weight gain and tooth decay. Source:

30 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Sports Drinks Sports drinks can play an important role in an athlete’s recovery if the athlete is engaged in prolonged vigorous physical activity. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends that sports drinks not be consumed after participating in short training or competition sessions. Save sports drinks for exercise that lasts for more than an hour or that takes place in very hot or humid conditions. Source:

31 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. SODA POP

32 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Regular Soda Pop Drink consisting of soda water, flavoring, and sugar-sweetened syrup Acidic in nature No nutrient value High in calories and sugar content –A typical 20-ounce soda drink contains 15 to 18 teaspoons of sugar and upwards of 240 calories. –A 64-ounce fountain soda drink could have up to 700 calories.

33 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Soda Pop Research has shown associations of soft drink intake with increased energy intake and body weight. Soft drink intake associated with lower intakes of milk, calcium, and other nutrients and with an increased risk of several medical problems (e.g., diabetes). Source:

34 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Diet Soda Pop Drink consisting of soda water, flavoring, and sweetened artificially. (A common sweetener is aspartame) Acidic in nature No nutrient value in the drink

35 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Set a SMART Goal! S=Specific: A specific goal has a much greater chance of being accomplished than a general goal. M=Measurable: Determine how you will know when you met your goal. Put numbers and time frames to your goals. A=Achievable: The action you want to do should be one that is possible for you. R=Realistic: Your goal should be one that is reasonable in your situation. T=Trackable: Over time, you will see the changes made, even though it might not be evident from one day to the next.

36 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. SMART Goal Examples I will drink only water and no other beverages for lunch for two weeks. (If usually use whole milk) I will buy 2% milk for one month. Then I will move to 1% milk for a month. Finally, I will move to skim milk.

37 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. What can you do to promote healthy drink options? Inquire about having healthy options available when having an event. Add a slot in your drink vending machine that includes healthy choices such as bottled water. Become a leader within your community/ organization to implement choices that will lead to overall better health!

38 UNL Extension Responsive. Innovative. Trusted. Summary Changing a habit or creating a new one can be hard. Remember that goals should be reviewed on a regular basis. New goals should be established after previous goals are met. Share your plans with others (extended family members, friends, co-workers) to help increase accountability.

39 Extension is a Division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln cooperating with the Countries and the United States Department of Agriculture. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programs abide with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture. Extension is a Division of the Institute of Agriculture and Natural Resources at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln cooperating with the Counties and the United States Department of Agriculture. University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension educational programs abide with the nondiscrimination policies of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and the United States Department of Agriculture. Reference to commercial products or trade names is made with the understanding that no discrimination is intended of those not mentioned and no endorsement by University of Nebraska–Lincoln Extension is implied for those mentioned.


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