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GAMIFYING HEALTH DATA COLLECTION Mariko Wakabayashi & RJ Kunde Department of Computer Science University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collaborators:

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Presentation on theme: "GAMIFYING HEALTH DATA COLLECTION Mariko Wakabayashi & RJ Kunde Department of Computer Science University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collaborators:"— Presentation transcript:

1 GAMIFYING HEALTH DATA COLLECTION Mariko Wakabayashi & RJ Kunde Department of Computer Science University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Collaborators: Jason Cho, Tom Olson, Shravan Gupta, and Seungchul Lee

2 MOTIVATION Health data collection is dependent on a user’s motivation to participate E.g. Health diary Increasing number of tools which can assist in identification, correlation and eventual care for patients and their diseases Growing opportunity for health professionals

3 APPROACH Aim for continuous user engagement Gamification to maintain user’s participation, and collect health data from numerous sources e.g. heart monitor sensor, accelerometer sensor Prototype: Developed a gamified mobile application that collects physical activity and users’ health information Focused on two types of health data Data from smartphone’s accelerometer sensor Data from users’ health question answers

4 WHAT IS GAMIFICATION? Gamification: The application of game mechanics (e.g. competition, rewards) to a particular task or goal in order to create motivation among participants Location-based Social Network: Foursquare Education: Khan Academy Professional Network; LinkedIn’s Profile Completeness Circle

5 EXAMPLES OF GAMIFICATION IN MEDICAL LITERATURE (1) Task 1: Educating the general public about healthy behavior Example: OrderUP! –players learn how to make healthier meal choices Field Study Conclusion  Encouraged participants to live healthier lifestyles  Participants engaged in four process of change identified by the Trans Theoretical Model

6 EXAMPLES OF GAMIFICATION IN MEDICAL LITERATURE (2) Task 2: Health diary annotation completed by particular demographics E.g. Pain Squad – mobile application that encourages young cancer patients to fill out pain reports. Raised the compliance rate in annotating pain reports from 11% to over 80%.

7 DR.POCKET – PROTOTYPE HEALTH MOBILE APPLICATION Goal: To accomplish Task 1 and 2 with our mobile application.  Health Diary Annotation by adults  Educate about healthy behavior and encourage a healthier lifestyle Dr. Pocket:  Asks user’s anxiety related questions  Tracks daily movement  Integration of two types of health data to understand user’s anxiety levels

8 DR.POCKET GAMIFICATION FRAMEWORK Answering Health Question Engage in Physical Activity Healthy Life-Style Points

9 DR.POCKET – HEALTH RELATED QUESTIONS Modeled after the Institute of Medicine’s main determinants of health Compiled surveys and scales from Centers for Disease Control (CDC), and Ian McDowell’s Measuring Health - A Guide to Rating Scales and Questionnaires Dr. Pocket Focus on anxiety One of the most common mental illness in the US Prevalent amongst students Consists 102 questions from 6 different categories: stress, sleep, fatigue, anxiety, pain, and depression

10 HEALTH QUESTION EXAMPLES

11 DR.POCKET – TRACKING MOVEMENT  Tracks movement with accelerometer and gyroscope  Goal is to obtain enough data to study the integration between health questions with physical activity and train application for feedback  Game elements added to step count Progress Wheel (Competition) Setting goal Awarding Points for Participation (Rewards)

12 DR.POCKET – STATISTICAL FEEDBACK Provided Information for the user:  Daily and accumulated score Calories Burned Step counts Distance Traveled Questions Answered Game Elements encouraging Competition:  Number of points obtained  Tangible visuals to understand calculated numbers  Acquired marketplace items and its duration

13 PILOT STUDY Hypotheses  Goal 1: Gamification in health data collection is effective  Goal 2: Integration of passive and active data collection is more effective than either approach on its own. Procedure  15 subjects used prototype application for 2 weeks  Subjects description: age group, 5 females/10 males, students Results  Collected 1,380 responses and over 747,000 step counts.  Participants enjoyed and vouch for gamification  “The concept of earning "points" for walking more or answering more questions is really what motivated me.”  “The application showed me how much lower than the target I was at on a daily basis so it prompted me to walk more.,”

14 CONCLUSION - FUTURE WORK Future Work: Improve user interface Expand on current features  Increase of questions from 100 to 500  Implement adaptive questions  Add network functionality to increase competition Conduct Larger Study  200 person, IRB sanctioned human study  Monitor user engagement, and train application to detect anxiety levels  Develop a feedback system based on results

15 QUESTIONS?


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