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Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Mike Dexel Water Resources Policy Lead Municipal Water Law.

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Presentation on theme: "Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Mike Dexel Water Resources Policy Lead Municipal Water Law."— Presentation transcript:

1 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Mike Dexel Water Resources Policy Lead Municipal Water Law and Water Use Efficiency Rule Redefining Distribution System Leakage

2 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 2 Mission To protect the health of the people of Washington State by ensuring safe and reliable drinking water.

3 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 3 The Municipal Water Law (MWL)  In 2003 the state legislature creates law to address growing water needs  Complex water law reform  Water systems can use “inchoate water” for growth within service area  Required Department of Health to adopt rules for efficient use of water

4 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 4 MWL Implications  Effect on planning program  With water system plan approval:  Gain additional connections  Expand service area  Result in fewer small water systems  Consistency between water system and local government planning

5 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 5 Water Use Efficiency Rule  Involved stakeholder input (Subcommittee Report)  Effective Date: January 22, 2007  Only applies to municipal water suppliers  Water systems with 15 or more residential service connections  Approximately 2,300 water systems statewide

6 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 6 Achievements During First Year of Implementation (2007)  Getting Started – WUE Guidebook  Over 30 training events statewide  Statewide Public Forum Schedule  Post goal setting meeting notice on DOH Web

7 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 7 What are the Water Efficiency Requirements?  Planning  Set customer goals to use water efficiently in a public forum  Annual performance report  Meter installation  Leakage standard

8 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 8 Planning Requirements  Forecast water demand based on implementation of WUE program  Implement measures or evaluate for cost effectiveness  Evaluate rates, reclaimed water opportunities  Implement customer measures (such as toilet rebates) to reach goal

9 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 9 Goal Setting Requirement  Establish a goal with:  Measurable water savings  Timeframe to achieve the goal  Specific to each water system  Use a public process to establish goal  Designed to enhance the efficient use of water by the water system customers

10 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 10 Annual Performance Report Must include:  Annual production  Leakage (volume and percentage)  Progress made in achieving goals  Progress made installing meters

11 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 11 Source and Service Meters  Source meters required now  Service meters required within 10 years (January 22, 2017)  Meters must be calibrated, replaced, and maintained for accuracy

12 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 12 Rationale for Meters  Authorizing statute, “…(leakage) limit in terms of percentage…of total water supplied”  Provide quantitative data  Most accurate way to calculate leakage  “If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it”

13 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 13 Number of Leaks

14 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 14 Volume of Water

15 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 15 The Leakage Standard  Only applies to distribution system  10% for most water systems  Follows general principles of International Water Association methodology  Importance of volume

16 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 16 Redefining Unaccounted for Water (UAFW)  Leakage is not “UAFW”  Never standardized  Defined differently  All water is accounted for  To understand water loss use:  Distribution system leakage  Authorized consumption

17 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 17 Leakage Includes  Actual leaks  Theft  Meter inaccuracies  Meter reading errors  Data collection errors  Calculation errors  Water main breaks

18 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 18 Authorized Consumption Includes  Sales to customers  Maintenance flushing  Fire fighting  Cleaning of tanks or reservoirs  Street cleaning Unmetered uses MUST BE tracked and estimated

19 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 19 The Leakage Formula Percent DSL = [(TP – AC) / (TP)] x 100  Where DSL = % of distribution system leakage  TP = total water produced and purchased  AC = authorized consumption

20 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 20 What About Volume?  Percentage is not the whole story  Leakage fluctuates with population, water efficiency savings  Reducing water loss is the goal, often better told through volume

21 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 21 Alternative Methodology Must be a “Better Evaluation”  Must be approved by the state  Must be published  Must have numerical standards so compliance can be determined

22 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 22 Compliance With Leakage Standard Four ways to be in compliance:  10% or less  Numerical standard for the alternative methodology  Develop and implement a water loss control action plan  20% or less for 500 connections or less

23 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 23 What is a Water Loss Control Action Plan?  Documented effort to reduce leakage by implementing water loss control methods  Timeframe for achieving the leakage standard  Budget to fund the plan  Technical or economical concerns that prevent compliance

24 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 24 Higher Leakage Requires Greater Efforts to Reduce Leaks  Assess data accuracy and collection methods (11-19%)  Implement field activities (20-29%)  Implement distribution system leakage control methods (above 30%)

25 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 25 How Do I Reduce Leaks?  Conduct water audit; leak detection survey  Repair leaky storage tanks  Calibrate or replace meters  Pressure management  Install acoustic leak detection loggers

26 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 26 Why Should I Reduce Leaks?  Regulatory compliance  Make a business case for reducing leaks  Save operating costs  Loss of revenue  Save on energy bills  What is the price of fixing a leak after the damage is done?

27 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 27 Why Should I Reduce Leaks? (cont.)  Protect public health, prevent contamination during pressure loss  Demonstrate stewardship of the resource to public/customers

28 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 28 Where are Those Leaks?  Majority annual volume of leaks occur on customer service piping  Filter backwash at treatment plant  Tank overflows  Meter inaccuracies  Unmetered facilities (parks, city hall)  Data transfer, math errors  Old infrastructure

29 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 29 Take Home Messages  If you can’t authorize it, consider it leakage  Do not use “unaccounted for” water to describe water loss  If you can’t measure it, you can’t manage it

30 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 30 For More Information Mike Dexel programs/wue.htm

31 Washington State Department of Health Division of Environmental HealthOffice of Drinking Water Public Health - Always Working for a Safer and Healthier Washington 31 Questions?


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