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National Wildlife Refuges in Missouri face an $18.4 million budget shortfall Missouri is home to spectacular natural resources including 10 national wildlife.

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Presentation on theme: "National Wildlife Refuges in Missouri face an $18.4 million budget shortfall Missouri is home to spectacular natural resources including 10 national wildlife."— Presentation transcript:

1 National Wildlife Refuges in Missouri face an $18.4 million budget shortfall Missouri is home to spectacular natural resources including 10 national wildlife refuges totaling about 70,000 acres. The Mingo National Wildlife Refuge protects one of the largest tracts of pristine bottomland hardwood forests in the state, and Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge is home to one of the larges wintering bald eagle concentrations in the United Statesl. Approximately 240,000 visitors enjoy hiking, bird watching, environmental education, hunting and fishing on Missouri’s refuges each year. The Refuge System in Missouri has identified: 18.4 million and 10 staff positions in unmet high priority needs. This shortfall prevents the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service from adequately managing and restoring wildlife habitat, safely maintaining facilities and providing quality recreational programs. Unfortunately, the Refuge System budget has remained relatively flat for the last two years. Due to rising costs, a flat budget erodes each refuge’s base funding, preventing vital positions from being filled and projects from being completed. The Refuge System in Missouri needs a $141,000 increase each year just to retain current services. Mingo National Wildlife Refuge, Missouri Mingo National Wildlife Refuge needs funding to improve its Visitor Services center and to build an environmental education classroom. National Wildlife Refuges: Missouri Funding Crisis Mingo National Wildlife Refuge, Pilot Knob National Wildlife Refuge and Ozark Cavefish National Wildlife Refuge will collectively require funding for eight new positions by 2022 to effectively pursue their Comprehensive Conservation Plans. Pictures courtesy US Fish and Wildlife Service

2 National Wildlife Refuge Funding Crisis About C.A.R.E CARE is a unique coalition of 21 conservation, scientific, sporting, and recreation organizations with more than 5 million members across the United States. CARE has been working since 1995 to help the National Wildlife Refuge System fight a serious funding crisis. American Birding Association American Fisheries Society American Sportfishing Association Congressional Sportsmen's Foundation Defenders of Wildlife Ducks Unlimited International Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies Izaak Walton League of America National Association of Service and Conservation Corps National Audubon Society National Rifle Association of America National Wildlife Federation National Wildlife Refuge Association Safari Club International The Wilderness Society The Wildlife Society Trout Unlimited U.S. Sportsmen's Alliance Assateague Coastal Trust Wildlife Forever Wildlife Management Institute 1010 Wisconsin Avenue, NW, Suite 200 Washington, DC Phone: Fax: Web: CareHome.html CARE recommends a $700 million annual operations and maintenance budget for the Refuge System The National Wildlife Refuge System faces a crippling $3 billion operations and maintenance budget shortfall, which continues to grow. An annual increase of $300 million will prevent the Refuge System from spiraling into more debt and allow the Fish and Wildlife Service to begin restoring habitat, maintaining facilities and expanding public use opportunities that have languished due to lack of funds. Faced with a flattened budget and increased costs, in just three years 74% of the refuges in the northeast will be bankrupt, according to a Fish and Wildlife Service analysis. Other regions are facing similar problems. Able to absorb some budget pressure over the years, refuges have reached a threshold forcing the Fish and Wildlife Service to de-staff entire refuges, and cut visitor services and habitat management at scores of refuges. Investing in refuges is good for communities and for wildlife National Wildlife Refuges are economic engines in many rural areas. According to a recently released economic analysis, Banking on Nature, by the Fish and Wildlife Service: Recreational visits to national wildlife refuges generate substantial economic activity. In FY 2004, more than 36.7 million people visited refuges for recreation. Their spending generated $1.37 billion of sales in regional economies. As this spending flowed through the economy, nearly 24,000 people were employed and $453.9 million in employment income was generated. At Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge in Missouri, for every $1 spent on the refuge’s budget, about $3.50 is generated in recreational expenditures to the local economy. About $300,000 of local tax revenues are generated through recreational expenditures.


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