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© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 27: Breakfast Breakfast.

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Presentation on theme: "© 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 27: Breakfast Breakfast."— Presentation transcript:

1 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Unit 27: Breakfast Breakfast will set the tone for many guests, every day; this is a great way to build good customer relations

2 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

3 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Egg Cookery Encompasses many different preparations Sanitation and safety is a main concern Keep eggs refrigerated until actual use All equipment cleaned before and after use Station cleaning very important Follow local health codes for proper handling

4 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Eggs in the Shell Boiling refers to simmering Water level in pot should be 2 inches over the eggs Ice bath Colander Holding equipment

5 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Cooking Fresh eggs Place in water to cover Return or bring to a boil Soft-cooked eggs are always started in simmering water Time from the boiling point Drain, use or chill, peel and store Egg whites should be firm, not rubbery, and yolks yellow, not green (fast cooking)

6 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Baked Eggs Shirred, en cocotte, sur la plate Combined with other ingredients Buttered ramekins on sheet pan Warm ramekins and add the eggs and garnish In a water bath or sheet pan, bake until desired degree of doneness Quality: yolks thick and glossy, whites set, served hot

7 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Poached Very fresh eggs Acidified water, just simmering 6 inches deep Slotted spoon and clean towel Crack eggs into a bowl, and place them in the water from the bowl Poach until desired doneness is achieved Lift out with the spoon, place to blot on the towel Serve on a rusk, toast, or in a cup on a heated plate The acid in the water helps firm the whites of the egg

8 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Poached Eggs may be partially poached, placed in cold water, then finished at service Quality poaching will produce firm whites, smooth in appearance, nice shape, soft yolk Guest may ask to have it more well done

9 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Fried Eggs Very popular, English and American style Equipment is a griddle, or good pan Spatula Cups to hold eggs Heated plates Very fresh eggs Neutral frying fat Seasoning and a garnish

10 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Cooking Fried Eggs Always preheat the skillet or griddle Add the fat and gently slide the eggs into the fat Cook to appropriate doneness, flip if called for, flip again and set on a hot plate Blot any excess oil Quality fried eggs will have yolks intact, no lace, no excess grease

11 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Scrambled Eggs Most popular Same equipment as for fried Add a bowl and whisk for whipping Heated plates and garnish Need seasoning, cream/milk/stock, if desired, to add to eggs while whisking Eggs may be purchased pasteurized, raw, already beaten—this is a safe, low-labor option

12 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Cooking Preheat the pan, add the oil, fat, butter Add the eggs, and stir and scrape Do not let the eggs get any browning If used for a buffet, be careful not to overcook them Any vegetable or meat garnishes, should be sautéed before adding the eggs to the pan Serve on hot plates and garnish Good scrambled eggs will be bright, creamy, and delicate in flavor

13 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Omelets Three basic types: rolled, flat, souffléed In these categories are frittatas, farmer’s tortillas Rolled omelets are very popular, as they can have a myriad of fillings You will need a blue steel or nonstick pan A bowl and whisk for beating the eggs Garnish Heated plates

14 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Procedure Preheat the pan and beat the fresh eggs Add the fat, swirl, add the eggs, stirring lightly until they start to curdle Scrape the sides, swirl, cook another second, add the filling, fold the omelet Slide it carefully to a plate An invaluable tool is a heat-resistant, rubber spatula Well-prepared omelets will have only yellow color, be puffy, moist and creamy interior

15 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

16 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Flat Omelets (Frittata) The mis en place is the same; a useful tool is a wide offset spatula Add the garnish and cook Ladle the beaten eggs onto the garnish, and try to keep a uniform round shape by swirling and stirring Place in a preheated oven and bake until puffy and eggs are set. Additional browning can be done in a salamander Evaluate for quality, looking for even cooking, even color, moist

17 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Soufléed or Puffy Omelets Equipment is similar Yolks and whites separated, seasoned, beaten, then folded into one another Add the egg mix to a preheated and buttered pan, cook until bottom and edges are set Place in a preheated oven It is cooked when an inserted skewer is clean upon removing Quality will be hot and puffy, light in texture, moist

18 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Quiche A custard, with garnish, baked in a pie shell You will need a blind-baked pie shell Fresh garnish Fresh custard Preheated oven with a sheet pan

19 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Procedure Beat and blend the eggs, cream, and seasoning Place the garnish into the pie shell, pour the egg mixture into the shell Place the quiche on a sheet, and bake in a preheated oven An inserted skewer or knife tip will come out clean when done Evaluating quality: look for set but soft custard, no deep cracks, golden crust, well seasoned

20 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Soufflés Equipment needed: –Cups with straight sides –Bowls for eggs and a large mixing bowl for folding –Spatula and baking sheets

21 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Procedure for Soufflé Clean eggs whites, beaten A heavy béchamel, enriched with egg yolks and flavorings Preheat the oven to 425˚F(218˚C) Fold the whites (soft peaks) into the base in three steps Fill the prepared molds Place immediately into the oven Serve immediately when done Evaluating for quality: soufflé will come to the top of the dish, the top is level, item is hot, moist and light in texture

22 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

23 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Other Breakfast Foods Pancakes, Crêpes, and Waffles Simple batters, all similar, all need slightly different equipment and garnishes Great with sweet accompaniments, sausages, bacon, or for luncheon or dessert items

24 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Crêpes/Pancakes Thin iron or blue skillet, or nonstick pan, griddle, waffle iron Appropriate fillings, syrups, jams, accompaniments Ladles, clean towel, neutral oil Prepare the batter; sometimes it is better to prepare ahead and let it sit Lubricate the griddle with a towel dipped in oil

25 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Crêpes/Pancakes (continued) Pour or drop the batter on the griddle, pan, iron Turn only once, when bubbles stay open and edges look dry Crêpes will cook very fast Serve pancakes immediately, place crêpes on parchment to cool unless serving right away

26 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. French Toast Consists of sliced bread dipped into a sweet egg wash or custard It is cooked on a medium-hot griddle or skillet until golden brown on both sides It is served with the same accompaniments as pancakes, immediately, on a hot plate Pancakes, waffles, crêpes, French toast, should be moist, golden brown, crisp edges, and no lumps in the batter

27 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Cereals Can be served hot or cold Have a wide preference among children and elderly Nutritious, inexpensive, easy to prepare, wide contribution margin Wide variety is available There are regional preferences The hot cereals are prepared similarly: whisked into boiling, salted water, cooked until plump, not mushy, fresh, nutty aroma, free of lumps, served in hot bowls Cold cereals: more varieties and brands than imaginable, are great for young children who prefer them to heartier breakfast foods.

28 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals.

29 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Meats and Fish Hash is a popular, regional favorite that helps a chef use up butts and ends of roasted meats Served with poached eggs and sometimes a béchamel or cheese sauce It can be griddled, baked, or heated in an iron skillet

30 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Bacon Cooked crisp and brown, is one of the most favorite accompaniments Baked, griddled, cooked in a skillet one order at a time Save the rendered bacon fat, as it is a flavor base for soups, sauces, sautéed vegetables

31 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Sausage Like bacon, may be grilled, baked, individually cooked Like bacon, save the fat as it makes a wonderful ingredient and a base for roux Loose bulk sausage can be baked or fried, links can be poached and fried Larger sausages (bangs) can be sliced and portioned and fried

32 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Steaks Usually small, thin cuts are grilled, griddled, or panfried Ham steaks, small loins, shoulder clod pieces, minute steaks, even chops are suitable for quick breakfast service Some are thin enough to be cooked from the frozen state

33 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Fish Popular fish items are grilled trout, kippered herring, smoked salmon, lox, grilled white-fleshed fish, salt cod, fish cakes These are largely regional, but larger hotels carry a large variety to accommodate their guests

34 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Other Breakfast Preparations Potatoes of different varieties such as Lyonnaise, home fries, röstii, hash browns Fruits in the form of fresh sliced, whole berries, compotes, preserves, chutneys, juices Breads, muffins, bagels, scones, quick breads, croissants, Danish pastries, and the irreplaceable toast

35 © 2006, Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ All Rights Reserved. American Culinary Federation: Culinary Fundamentals. Beverages Fruit smoothies and yogurt drinks Coffees of uncountable varieties, preparations and flavors Remember that coffee does not hold for more than 45 minutes; it keeps well in vacuum and pump containers Hot chocolate Tisanes or herbal tea, always brewed with fresh boiling water and allowed to steep


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