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Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA Infections

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Presentation on theme: "Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA Infections"— Presentation transcript:

1 Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA Infections
UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting This month’s safety topic is Staph and MRSA UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

2 Biological Hazards Periodically Discuss Various Biological Hazards
Routes of Exposure Preventive Measures Selected Biological Hazards Staph and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus (MRSA) As part of our monthly safety meeting topics we will periodically discuss various biological hazards. For each of the selected biological agents we will discuss the hazard, the routes of exposure, and the preventive measures you should take to prevent exposure. This month’s biological hazard is Staph and Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus, which is commonly know as MRSA. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

3 Staph and MRSA Staph – Bacteria MRSA
Infections Ranging from Skin boils to Severe Blood Infections MRSA Type of Staph Resistant to Certain Antibiotics Two Major Types Health Care Associated (HA-MRSA) Community Associated (CA-MRSA) Staph: Staph is a type of bacteria. It may cause skin infections that look like pimples or boils. Skin infections caused by Staph may be red, swollen, painful, or have pus or other drainage. MRSA: Some Staph (known as Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus Aureus or MRSA) are resistant to certain antibiotics which make it harder to treat. There are two major types of MRSA, Health Care Associated (HA-MRSA) and Community Associated (CA-MRSA) UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

4 MRSA Health Care Associated (HA-MRSA) Community-Associated (CA-MRSA)
Persons in Hospitals & Health Care Facilities Recent Medical Procedures – Dialysis, Surgery, Catheters Nursing Homes - Persons with Weaken Immune Systems Community-Associated (CA-MRSA) Most Common Type of Soft Tissue Infection Seen in Outpatient Setting Focus on CA-MRSA in This Presentation HA-MRSA: Occur most frequently in hospitals and healthcare facilities, such as nursing homes and dialysis centers. HA-MRSA may affect persons who have weaken immune systems. CA-MRSA: Is the most common type of soft tissue infection which is seen in outpatient settings. We will focus on community associated MRSA during this month’s safety meeting. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

5 Staph and MRSA Bacteria
Can Live on the Skin and/or Nose of Healthy Individuals without Causing Any Symptoms of Disease Injury to Skin (Scrape or Cut) Allow Staph or MRSA Bacteria to Enter Skin and Cause an Infection Staph and MRSA bacteria can live on the skin and/or in the nose of healthy individuals without causing any symptoms of disease. When there is an injury to the skin, such as a scrape or a cut, the Staph or MRSA bacteria is allowed to enter the skin, and may result in an infection. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

6 Who Gets CA-MRSA Close Contact with an Infected Person
Direct Physical Contact (Not Through the Air) with an Infected Person Indirect Contact – Touching Objects Contaminated with the MRSA Bacteria Towels, Sheets, Wound Dressings, Clothes, Razors Workout Areas or Sports Equipment Who Gets CA-MRSA? CA-MRSA can be spread through close contact with an infected person, either direct contact, or indirect contact. Direct Contact - Is through direct physical contact with the infected person. It is not spread through inhalation. Indirect Contact – Is through touching objects contaminated with the MRSA bacteria, such as towel, sheets, wound dressings, clothes, razors, or gym/workout areas/sports equipment. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

7 MRSA Infections Usually Mild, Limited to the Surface of the Skin
Treated with Proper Hygiene and Antibiotics If Left Untreated or Not Recognized Early Can Be Difficult to Treat Can Progress to Life-Threatening Blood or Bone Infections MRSA Infections – Usually mild and limited to the surface of the skin. It can be treated through proper hygiene, antibiotics, and/or having the doctor drain the infection. If Left Untreated or Not Recognized Early – The MRSA infection can become more difficult to treat. If left untreated, the infection can become more a serious blood or bone infection which could become life-threatening. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

8 Staph and MRSA Usually First Look Like Spider Bites or Red Bumps Which Become Swollen & Painful May Fill with Pus Staph and MRSA – Usually first look like spider bites or red bumps which become swollen and painful. The infection may also fill with pus. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

9 Incidents of CA-MRSA Athletic Settings
Close Personal Contact – Wrestling & Football Equipment – Workout Equipment, Gym Mats, Uniforms Personal Items –Towels, Razors, Clothes Schools, Dormitories, Military Barracks, Correctional Facilities, CA-MRSA Incidents Athletic Settings: - Football and wrestling teams where there is close contact with other athletes - Sharing Athletic equipment – Workout equipment, gym mats, and uniforms - Sharing personal items – Towels, razors, and clothing. Other incidents: MRSA incidents have also broken out in locations where people live in close proximity with other person, such as schools, dorm rooms, military barracks, and correctional facilities. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

10 Five “C’s” – Make MRSA Easier to Spread
Crowding Frequent Skin-to-Skin Contact Compromised Skin (Cuts, Abrasions) Contaminated Items/Surfaces Lack of Cleanliness What are the five C’s which make MRSA easier to spread? Crowding Frequent skin-to-skin Contact Compromised skin – Cuts, abrasions Contaminated items/surfaces Lack of Cleanliness UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA

11 Prevent Spreading of MRSA
Wash Hands Often or Use Alcohol-Based Hand Sanitizer Keep Cuts & Scrapes Clean and Covered with Bandages Do Not Touch Other People’s Cuts or Bandages Do Not Share Personal Items (Towels or Razors) Wipe Down Gym Equipment Before and After Use In closing, here are five suggestions on how present the spread of MRSA: 1. Wash your hands often or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer Keep cuts and scrapes clean and covered with bandages Do not touch other people’s cuts or bandages Do not share personal items, towels, razors, uniforms, etc. If you go to a gym, make it a practice to wipe down the equipment before and after use. UCOP October 2008 Safety Meeting Biological Hazards: Staph and MRSA


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