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Welcome to Field Controls Welcome to Field Controls Residential Ventilation Residential Ventilation Part 2 Part 2 1.

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Presentation on theme: "Welcome to Field Controls Welcome to Field Controls Residential Ventilation Residential Ventilation Part 2 Part 2 1."— Presentation transcript:

1 Welcome to Field Controls Welcome to Field Controls Residential Ventilation Residential Ventilation Part 2 Part 2 1

2 Introduction A.HHS Demo Free download at Apple App store or Droid free play B.Why ventilation is necessary C.How HRVs & ERVs work D.Determining the ventilation o ACH Method o ASHRAE 62.2 E. Function and role of controls 3

3 Why Do We Need Ventilation? Why do we need ventilation? What are the signs of poor ventilation? 4

4 Older homes typically, have passive ventilation Uncontrolled ventilation No heat or energy recovery Cold and drafty in heating season Higher energy bills for Cooling & Heating Newer homes have a vapor barrier that minimizes air infiltration Poor indoor air quality High indoor humidity in heating season Stale air Why Do We Need Ventilation? 5

5 Sources of indoor air contamination: Chemicals (cleaners, paints solvents) Carpeting / Furniture Cabinetry / Building materials People and their behavior Cooking Showering Pets – dander, litter boxes Radon – soil gas Attached garage Why Do We Need Ventilation? 6

6 The Result: Indoor air can be up to 100 times more polluted than outdoor air. Even in our largest and most industrialized cities. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Why Do We Need Ventilation? 7

7 Indoor Air Quality Facts: Asthma and severe allergies affect some 57 million people. - Environmental Protection Agency Asthma incidence has jumped 61% since 1982 Coincidental with tighter home construction practices. Asthma is the leading cause of chronic illness in young children. 6.8 million children have asthma. American Lung Association 45% of homes in the United States have someone with a respiratory related illness 1.9 Million emergency doctor visits a year 8

8 Types of indoor air contaminants: Formaldehyde Off gassing of furniture carpets etc… Carbon Dioxide CO2 & Carbon Monoxide CO Volatile Organic Compounds VOCs Suspended Particulate (cigarette smoke, dust) Mold and Mildew Viruses and bacteria Why Do We Need Ventilation? 9

9 Ailments caused / exacerbated by indoor air pollutants: Allergies Respiratory problems / breathing disorders such as: asthma, emphysema, bronchial and others…. Increased illnesses Hypersensitivity: 20% of absenteeism are related to allergies and other respiratory illness Why Do We Need Ventilation? 10

10 What is being done about the growing issues? 11

11 Money in the bag! The tighter the building, the worse the indoor air quality Modern buildings are well insulated and sealed to conserve energy Many home improvements are being done which also means tighter older homes Poor air quality contributes to allergies, asthma, headaches, fatigue, etc… 12

12 Why ventilation is necessary! 13

13 Whatdoes the HRV do ? What does the HRV do ? How It Works 14

14 Definition: A “balanced” system introduces the same amount of air into the building as it exhausts. How It Works 15

15 PART I How It Works Stale Air From Inside Fresh Air From Outside 16

16 Balanced Ventilation with up to 88% Heat Recovery How It Works Fresh Air to Inside Stale Air to Outs ide Fresh Air to Inside 17

17 OD Temp + (Effectiveness X (ID Temp – OD Temp)) = Delivered Air Temperature Example: 70°F Indoor Temp. / 32°F Outdoor Temp. HRV200 example 74% 32F 32 F + (.74 x (38) ) = 60 F HRV95 example 88% 32F 32F + (.88 x (38) ) = 65 F A huge difference versus open window / draft ventilation Sensible Effectiveness 18

18 HRV & ERV Heat Recovery Ventilators (HRV) are used in areas that typically spend more time in a heating season than cooling Energy Recovery Ventilators (ERV) are designed for the areas of the deep south that experience high humidity, and have longer cooling seasons than heating ERVs are not suitable for climates where the temperature drops below 25°F for more than 5 days in a row 19

19 HRVs and ERV HRVs and ERV Models FC95HRV FC155HRV FC200HRV FC150ERV 20

20 FC95HRV 95 CFM airflow size range 88% Sensible Effectiveness Compact design for tight installations Patented Aluminum HRV Core Built in relay for appliance fan interface Dehumidistat disable feature Controls are accessories 21

21 FCHRV155 & FCHRV & 200 CFM airflow size ranges Sensible Effectiveness 73% & 74% Balancing Collars (2) Built in Door port balancing (optional part) Recirculation Defrost Built in relay appliance fan interface Dehumidistat disable feature External terminal block wiring Patented Aluminum HRV Core Controls are Accessories 22

22 FCERV CFM airflow size range Sensible Effectiveness 81% Warm humid climates Core transfers heat & moisture Built in relay interface to Fan External terminal block Dehumidistat disable feature Controls are Accessories Core Vacuum or Cold water rinse No Defrost 23

23 Aluminum HRV Core HRV Core 124 Aluminum plates 62 cells for Fresh incoming air 62 cells for Stale exhaust air Lifetime Core Warranty Wash in warm soapy water Warm water Rinse Do not pressure wash Do not place in dishwasher How It Works 24

24 How It Works ERV Core 124 Energy Exchanging Cells 62 for incoming Fresh air 62 for exhausting Stale air 5 Year Warranty Clean - Vacuum or cold water rinse 25

25 HRV or ERV Developed by Department of Energy (DOE) International Energy Conservation Code (IECC) ASHRAE 62.2 Climate Zone Map 26

26 Defrost Operation 27

27 Thermistor As outdoor conditions cool, the temperature sensor (thermistor) tracks the supply air temperature Defrost Operation 28

28 Heat Recovery Ventilator Defrost Operation Defrost Damper Closing Convert Temps in notes to F 29

29 Heat Recovery Ventilator Defrost Operation Defrost Damper Closed Re-circulated air warms the core Warm air from inside 30

30 Heat Recovery Ventilator Defrost Operation Defrost Damper Remains Closed Re-circulated air warms the core Warm air from inside No Flow 31

31 Field Controls HRV Winter Humidity Reduction Reduces winter indoor humidity levels Window condensation can cause micro colonies of mold Ignoring the issue can lead to more sever problems 32

32 Tight homes can have high humidity during the heating season! Signs of condensationSigns of condensation o Moisture / water vapor on windows o Mold / mildew formation o Musty odors Winter Humidity Reduction 33

33 A Dehumidistat feature is on the Dehumidistat Ventilation control It automatically initiates high-speed ventilation when indoor humidity levels reach or exceed the set point The HRV automatically reverts back to it’s previous fan speed once humidity levels are reduced Winter Humidity Reduction 34

34 De-humidistat Disable Thermistor measures outside temperature every 6 hours 4 consecutive reading above 59°F disables De-humidistat 4 consecutive reading below 59°F reinstates De-humidistat Winter Humidity Reduction Thermistor Fresh Air Intake 35

35 How Much Ventilation is Required? How do you determine the ventilation for a home? 36

36 Air Change per Hour Method AC/H = (square footage x ceiling height) / 60) x 0.35 How Much Ventilation is Required? 37

37 Example: Air Change per Hour Method Formula AC/H = (square footage x ceiling height) / 60) x Sq. ft. home 8 ft. ceilings 1500 x 8 = 12,000 cu. ft. (total volume) 12,000 cu. ft. ÷ 60 = x 0.35 = 70 CFM How Much Ventilation is Required? 38

38 ASHRAE 62.2 Required for New Housing Energy Star 3.0 Ventilation Rate = (square footage/100) + ((# Bdrms+1) (7.5)) Note: Must count the basement / conditioned space (Compliance for Energy Star 3.0 July 1, 2012) How Much Ventilation is Required? 40

39 ASHRAE 62.2 ASHRAE 62.2 Ventilation Rate = (square footage/100) + ((Bdrm.+1) (7.5)) (+ 1 figures 2 people in the master bedroom) Example: 2 story house with basement 2 Bdrm. total 1500 sq. ft sq. ft. ÷ 100 = 15 CFM 2 Bdrm. x 7.5 = 15 + (1) 7.5 = 22.5 CFM 15 CFM CFM = 37.5 CFM Constant How Much Ventilation is Required? 41

40 ASHRAE

41 Controls Instruction Manual Page 4 58

42 Controls Default Setting Fan Off 20 minutes Fan On 10 minutes Vent On 10 minutes Vent Off 20 minutes 57


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