Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

DISTRICT OF MISSION Community Amenity Contributions and Related Community Amenity Projects Public Information Meeting October 2, 2008.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "DISTRICT OF MISSION Community Amenity Contributions and Related Community Amenity Projects Public Information Meeting October 2, 2008."— Presentation transcript:

1 DISTRICT OF MISSION Community Amenity Contributions and Related Community Amenity Projects Public Information Meeting October 2, 2008

2 Community amenities are generally capital facilities/improvements that are needed to service a growing population or create a more complete community, e.g. cultural/arts centers, recreational facilities, transit improvements, police buildings, parks & trails, etc.

3 Development Cost Charges (DCCs) are limited by legislation to funding basic infrastructure that is required because of growth, namely: drainage, parkland purchases, roads, sewage, and water.

4 Financial Contributions for Community Amenities Policy adopted in 1996 The Policy recognizes that residential rezoning results in new development/ growth that in turn creates a demand for new community facilities/amenities

5 Contributions were $1,000 per single family unit and $2,500 per multi-family unit up until 2007 In 2007, a contribution of $1,800 for both single and multi-family units was established The current contribution level is $1,850 for both single and multi-family units

6 Proposed developer community amenity contribution is $10,300 for each single and multi-family unit that results from residential rezoning Increase reflects the cost and scope of the proposed projects, and the sharing of costs by taxpayers and developers

7 The primary effect of developer community amenity contributions is to put downward pressure on the value of development sites, i.e. land, not increase the cost of housing * Same effect as rising DCC levies * Increase will result in lower land values * *Coriolis Consulting Corp. Report dated February 2007

8 Developers are not bound to buy land that requires rezoning; they can instead purchase sites already zoned for development * Council has an obligation to consider the fiscal impact of growth when considering a rezoning application * If a proposed project will impose unacceptable capital cost burdens on the community, Council can reasonably deny the application * *Coriolis Consulting Corp. Report dated February 2007

9 Important for the community to tell council and staff: Whether proposed community amenity projects are important? What portion should be paid for by developers versus taxpayers?

10 Project Description Project ScopeProposed Years Dike Trails & Related Signage Extends along the entire 17,000 meter Fraser River shoreline adjacent to Mission’s south boundary, linked to the Trans-Canada Trail; would be a multi-use trail that is paved for bikes, roller- blades, walking, etc. with a horse trail along side portions of the trail, especially where there are logical linkages to ALR and horse routes to 2022 Enhancements to Silver Creek Parkway Length of trail is estimated at 6,000 meters; includes infrastructure such as trail heads, parking, washrooms, water supply, benches, signage, etc to 2015

11 Project Description Project ScopeProposed Years District-Wide Trail System About 33,000 meters of trails, plus 5,000 meters of trail linkages needed to connect SURA to Mission-Wide trail network; trails would cross the community east-west and north-south and link to existing trails and logging roads; provision for some trail linkages along lower traffic local roads as required to 2038 New Playfields & Parks Infrastructure 2 playing fields 3 softball diamonds 4 playgrounds 3 hard courts/tennis courts Skateboard park

12 Project Description Project ScopeProposed Years Playground Equipment & Landscaping for New Parks Playground equipment & landscaping for 2 parks per year 2009 to 2038 Transit Exchange Provision for one acre parcel of land plus construction costs 2018 Expansion of Public Works Building To double the size of the existing Dewdney Trunk Road building 2022 Pool Addition20,000 square foot addition to existing pool 2025

13 Project Description Project ScopeProposed Years New Leisure Complex & Sports Park 45,000 square foot arenas with 2 additional sheets of ice & 2,500 seating capacity Stadium 1 Synthetic Field 3 Playing Fields 4 Softball Diamonds Park lighting & bleachers 8-lane rubberized track with natural grass inner field Tennis facilities/courts Lacrosse box 40 acres of land for above listed facilities to be supplied by District 2020

14 Project Description Project ScopeProposed Years Expansion of Police Building Estimate 8,000 square foot expansion2011 Recycling Centre Land, building and equipment2018 Public ArtPublic Art - subcommittee of the Cultural Committee to develop a strategy and related criteria for public art projects 2009 to 2038

15 Project Description Project ScopeProposed Years New Civic Centre New City Hall (37,000 square feet - includes room for expansion) Arts Centre – 7,000 square feet Seniors Centre – 7,000 square feet Youth Centre – 7,000 square feet Multi-purpose space – 4,000 square feet Museum space – 4,000 square feet Provision for site preparation, flood- proofing, site remediation, etc. 2011

16 Project Description Project ScopeProposed Years Water Front Planning Detailed planning including technical studies, etc to 2010 Water Front Amenities “Public Realm” of water front area, e.g. market square, benches, trees, garbage cans, arbor, historic signage and maps, fountains and other items determined through the water front planning process; strategy for implementation would be part of the planning process to 2038 Community Beautification Beautification projects throughout Mission, e.g. downtown lighting, District entrance signs, boulevard flowers, etc to 2038

17 Project Description Total Estimated Cost % Attributable to Taxpayers $s Attributable to Taxpayers Proposed Funding Strategy/ Sources Dike Trails & Related Signage $10,200,00050%$5,100,000Community Works Gas Tax funds Enhancement to Silver Creek Parkway $948,00050%$475,000Community Works Gas Tax funds District-Wide Trail System $6,004,00050%$3,002,000Community Works Gas Tax funds

18 Project Description Total Estimated Cost % Attributable to Taxpayers $s Attributable to Taxpayers Proposed Funding Strategy/ Sources New Playfields and Parks Infrastructure $2,889,00020%$577,800General Capital Reserve Fund Playground Equipment & Landscaping for New Parks $3,218,00020%$643,600General Capital Reserve Fund Transit Exchange $1,200,00020%$240,000Community Works Gas Tax funds (CWGT)

19 Project Description Total Estimated Cost % Attributable to Taxpayers $s Attributable to Taxpayers Proposed Funding Strategy/ Sources Expansion of Public Works Buildings $8,000,00020%$1,600,000Land Sale Reserve Fund Addition to Pool$15,000,00020%$3,000,000Gaming Reserve Account New Leisure Complex and Sports Fields $64,650,000 less land = $40, % - 50%$14,655,000General Capital Reserve Fund (GCR) Expansion of Policing Building $2,400,00020%$480,000Gaming Reserve Account (GRA)

20 Project Description Total Estimated Cost % Attributable to District $s Attributable to District Proposed Funding Strategy/ Sources Recycling Centre $5,500,00050%$2,750,000Land Sale Reserve Fund & Grant Funds New Civic Centre $30,000,00050%$15,000,000Sale of Existing City Hall; GCR; Borrowing; Grants Public Art$1,500,00050%$750,000Stabilization Reserve Water Front Planning $1,500,00050%$750,000GRA and CWGT

21 Project Description Total Estimated Cost % Attributabl e to Taxpayers $s Attributable to Taxpayers Proposed Funding Strategy/ Sources Water Front Amenities $7,500,00050%$3,750,000Accumulated Surplus Community Beautification $5,978,00050%$2,989,000Accumulated Surplus TOTALS$166,487,000*$55,761,400 *$166,487,00 less land for Leisure Complex ($24 million) = $142,487,000

22 Preliminary funding plan based on certain assumptions Results in approximate 0.25% tax increase ($60,000 per year) from 2010 to 2020 No provision for operating costs May be possible to allocate new construction revenues as opposed to a direct tax increase One can minimize the property tax impact of large community amenity projects by planning and saving well ahead of time, and by allowing for some flexibility in terms of the timing of projects

23 Hard Copy of Power Point Presentation Report entitled “Funding the District of Mission’s Share of District-Wide Community Amenities” Questions & Answers Document Package of Historical Reports and Motions regarding Community Amenities Request for Public Feedback Form

24 General agreement on community amenity projects and cost-sharing between developers and taxpayers Once vision is in place, now is the time to start saving The future starts now


Download ppt "DISTRICT OF MISSION Community Amenity Contributions and Related Community Amenity Projects Public Information Meeting October 2, 2008."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google