Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation is loading. Please wait.

Presentation at the 82nd ACFAS Convention Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Roger Farley, Roger Guillemette and François Rivest Official Language Community Development.

Similar presentations


Presentation on theme: "Presentation at the 82nd ACFAS Convention Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Roger Farley, Roger Guillemette and François Rivest Official Language Community Development."— Presentation transcript:

1 Presentation at the 82nd ACFAS Convention Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Roger Farley, Roger Guillemette and François Rivest Official Language Community Development Bureau, Health Canada Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada

2 Presentation Overview Health Canada Support: Official Languages Health Contribution Program State of Research on Interpretation Services Current Situation in Canada A Strategic Investment Fund to Support Research on Interpretation Services Conclusions / Next Steps Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 2

3 Health Canada Support: Official Languages Health Contribution Program The Program operates in tandem with provincial, territorial and regional health authorities across the country to support three inter-related priority activities : 1.Integrating health professionals in official language minority communities (OLMCs); 2.Strengthening local health networking capacity; and 3.Health services access and retention projects. The main objective of the Program is to improve Canadians’ access to high- quality health services in the two official languages. The immediate results are 1.Increased access to bilingual health professionals and intake staff in OLMCs; and 2.Increased health services for OLMCs within health institutions and communities. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 3

4 Health Canada Support: Official Languages Health Contribution Program (cont’d) Situation in Canada: Dispersed/aging communities and unequal access. Some provinces have access legislation (New Brunswick, Quebec, Ontario) or policies (Manitoba, Nova Scotia). The Program does not provide any guarantee that all interactions with health professionals and staff will take place in the patient’s language. Since OLMCs are often dispersed, there are fewer possibilities for finding or training bilingual health professionals in a number of communities. Very often, second language training initiatives only allow health professionals to understand their OLMC patients. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 4

5 State of Research on Interpretation Services There are more and more studies on the importance of effective communication between professionals and patients in the health care system. Poor quality inter-linguistic communications have repercussions for the user, the health professional and the health care facility. The use of professional interpreters improves the quality of communication and reduces the risk of communication errors and problems of an ethical nature (Ouimet et al., 2013). Most of the studies show that interpretation services improve patients’ understanding of the diagnosis, foster efficient use of the health care system, improve patient health outcomes and increase patient satisfaction with health care services (Karliner et al., 2007). The lack of interpretation services can lead to the inefficient use of health services due to wrong diagnoses, unnecessary tests, misinterpretation of treatment, etc. (Crammond, 2002). Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 5

6 State of Research (cont’d) Interpretation Services (formal/informal): Face-to-face, telephone, videoconference. Formal interpreters with interpretation training (e.g.: a professional interpreter hired by a facility or a remote service) and informal interpreters who are asked to interpret but have no specific training (e.g., a bilingual employee, a volunteer who speaks the required language or a family member) (Ouimet et al., 2013). Informal interpreters are used more than formal interpreters, because of cost issues (Shahsiah and Grégoire, 2006). Using a family member as interpreter can lead to sensitive situations in which the family member might refuse to convey all the information to the user or omit some, whether voluntarily or involuntarily. The use of informal interpreters can also result in serious violations of confidentiality (Ouimet et al., 2013). Better results can be obtained through professional or formal interpreters (Karliner 2007). Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 6

7 State of Research (cont’d) Project entitled “Strengthening Access to Primary Health Care” in Vancouver, Toronto and Montreal funded by the Primary Health Care Transition Fund, Health Canada (Hoen, Nielsen and Sasso, 2006) found: “Health care providers’ and administrators’ lacked awareness about the benefits of interpreting and potential negative impacts of poor communication:” In Vancouver, a risk assessment management tool was developed in a questionnaire format to enable administrators to assess their programs in terms of access. “Health care providers’ lacked knowledge about working effectively with trained interpreters:” A French-language video for health care providers has since been prepared in cooperation with various Montreal organizations. “Under-utilization of interpreter services in primary health care:” A service delivery pilot project in two Toronto facilities showed how interpreter services can be implemented in primary health care settings. “Lack of training for interpreters specific to the primary health care setting:” An orientation module proved to be a useful introduction for interpreters called on to interpret in primary care settings. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 7

8 Current Situation in Canada Many Canadians lack access to a health facility or health care provider able to provide services in their language. In situations where there is no health professional able to serve patients in their own language, interpreter services can be a solution. At present, there is very little information about specialized health care interpretation courses. Existing interpreter services are often used to facilitate communication between health professionals and Allophone users of the health system. However, some provinces use these services (such as interpreter pools) for Francophones and Anglophones in minority situations who do not have access to health care in their language. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 8

9 Current Situation in Canada (cont’d) Quebec Inter-regional interpreter pool: professional interpreter services in social environments (familiar with medical terms) paid for by the CSSS for Allophone individuals who speak neither English nor French, primarily in the Montreal area (some 50 languages). In the Mauricie region, there is an agreement giving the Agence de la santé et des services sociaux access to a professional interpreter pool for its Anglophone clients. Megantic English-speaking Community Development Corporation: volunteer medical support and interpreter services – trained by the Thetford CSSS, but not specialized in the translation of medical information. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 9

10 Current Situation in Canada (cont’d) Manitoba The Winnipeg Regional Health Authority provides professional interpreter services in 33 languages, available 24/7. Interpretation services may also be provided in French when bilingual health professionals are unavailable. Alberta Interpreter services provided in 20 languages, including French, and by telephone in 200 languages. British Columbia Provincial interpretation and translation service in 50 languages, 24/7, in person or by telephone. The services are paid for by the health care providers. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 10

11 A Strategic Investment Fund to Support Research on Interpretation Services Health Canada has created a Strategic Investment Fund (SIF) to fund targeted initiatives designed to help minority Anglophone and Francophone communities obtain health services in the language of their choice. Under the SIF, one of Health Canada’s goals is to find out how interpreter services are being used in Canada, in English and in French. »What are current practices in Canada with respect to the use of interpreters? Use of formal, informal interpreters, other? In health care settings, administrative regions, provinces/territories? Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 11

12 A Strategic Investment Fund to Support Research on Interpretation Services (cont’d) A call for proposals has been launched and letters of intent have been received to answer the following questions: »Is there a need for professional health interpreters in the health sector and, if so, in which region(s) and under what circumstances? What are the conditions of employment for these interpreters? »What are the existing training programs and are they effective for interactions in the health field? What needs to be done to develop a professional accreditation / diploma program in health care interpretation? »What needs to be done to put in place the policies and guidelines for using professional health care interpreters in health care settings? »What needs to be done to train health care providers to use health care interpreters effectively? Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 12

13 Conclusions and Next Steps The new knowledge will be useful only if we can answer the following question: »What approaches can governments, health care facilities and communities take to improve interpretation services where bilingual health services are unavailable? Ideal future situation for Health Canada: »Professional interpreters trained in the health field. »Primary care facilities with service standards for linguistically and culturally adapted care. »Health professionals trained to work with professional interpreters. »Performance indicators in health care facilities for measuring the impact of using professional interpreters. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 13

14 Bibliography Crammond, R Health Care Interpretation Information and Education Network (HCIIEN). Position Paper on Interpretation in Health Care in Toronto. Hoen, B., Nielsen, K. and Sasso, A Health Care Interpreter Services: Strengthening access to primary health care. National Report: An overview of the accomplishments, outcomes and learnings of the SAPHC project. Project funded by the Primary Health Care Transition Fund. Karliner, L.S., Jacobs, E.A., Chen, A.H. and Mutha, S Do Professional Interpreters Improve Clinical Care for Patients with Limited English Proficiency? A Systematic Review of the Literature. Health Services Research 42(2): Ouimet, A-M., Trempe, N., Vissandjée, B. and Hemlin, I Language Adaptation in Health Care and Health Services: Issues and Services. Institut national de santé publique du Québec. Shahsiah, S. and Grégoire, S Health Care Interpreter Services: Strengthening Access to Primary Health Care, Literature Review: Examining language barriers and interpreter services in Canada’s health care sector. Project funded by the Primary Health Care Transition Fund. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 14

15 Other Relevant Documents and Works Brach, C., Fraser, I. and Paez, K Crossing the Language Chasm: An in-depth analysis of what language assistant programs look like in practice. Health Affairs 24(2): March/April. Daniels, L. and Nielsen, K Health Care Interpreter Services: Strengthening Access to Primary Health Care. Capstone Forum Summary Report: An Overview of the Discussions and Outcomes of the SAPHC Project’s National Capstone Forum, May 31 to June 2, Report submitted to the Primary Health Care Transition Fund. Flores, G The Impact of Medical Interpreter Services on the Quality of Health Care: A Systematic Review. Medical Care Research and Review 62: Galvez, E. and Wilson-Stronks, A Hospitals, Language and Culture: A Snapshot of the Nation: Exploring Cultural and Linguistic Services in the Nation’s Hospitals. The Joint Commission. The California Endowment. Jacobs, E. Chen, A., Karliner, L., Agger-Gupta, N. and Mutha, S The Need for More Research on Language Barriers in Health Care: A Proposed Research Agenda. The Milbank Quarterly 84(1): Jacobs, E. Sanchez Leos, G., Rathouz, P. and Fu, P Shared Networks of Interpreter Services, at Relatively Low Cost, Can Help Providers Serve Patients with Limited English Skills. Health Affairs 30(10): Jacobs, E., Shepard, D., Suaya, J., Stone, E Overcoming Language Barriers in Health Care: Costs and Benefits of Interpreter Services. American Journal of Public Health 94(5): Karliner, L. Pérez-Stable, E. and Gildengorin, G The Language Divide: The Importance of Training in the Use of Interpreters for Outpatient Practice. Journal of General Internal Medicine 19: Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 15

16 Other Relevant Documents and Works (cont’d) Miller, J. and Hollander, M Assessment of Continuing Care Requirements in First Nations and Inuit Communities: Review of Literature and National Health Data Sources. Health Canada. Misra-Hebert, A. and Isaacson, J Overcoming Health Care Disparities via better Cross-Cultural Communication and Health Literacy. Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine 79(2). Regroupement des intervenants francophones en santé et en services sociaux de l’Ontario (RIFSSSO) Une bonne communication est essentielle à des soins de santé de qualité. Les interprètes médicaux professionnels. Sasso, A The Affiliation of Multicultural Service Agencies and Societies (AMSSA). Achieving Equal Access in Health Care. Vancouver, BC. Smedley, B. Stith, A. and Nelson A. Eds Unequal Treatment: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health Care. Washington, DC: National Academies Press. The Toronto Star Lesley Ciarula Taylor. “Language Called Health Care Barrier: Newcomers ill because they can’t communicate with doctors and lack services of interpreters.” Youdelman, M. and Perkins, J Providing Language Interpretation Services in Health Care Settings: Examples from the Field. National Health Law Program. Field Report. New York: The Commonwealth Fund. Interpretation Services in the Health Care System: Issues and Strategies for Canada 16


Download ppt "Presentation at the 82nd ACFAS Convention Tuesday, May 13, 2014 Roger Farley, Roger Guillemette and François Rivest Official Language Community Development."

Similar presentations


Ads by Google