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British Literature – yes, this is for you. 1.Get out your response on “Medieval Times” to be graded. 2.Trips taken for the purpose of renewal or inspiration,

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Presentation on theme: "British Literature – yes, this is for you. 1.Get out your response on “Medieval Times” to be graded. 2.Trips taken for the purpose of renewal or inspiration,"— Presentation transcript:

1 British Literature – yes, this is for you. 1.Get out your response on “Medieval Times” to be graded. 2.Trips taken for the purpose of renewal or inspiration, even if they are not religious, can loosely be called pilgrimages. Think about a pilgrimage you’ve taken or would like to take. In at least 250 words, Describe your pilgrimage in your W.N. 3.If you need more help understanding what a pilgrimage is, Read pg. 86 on “Pilgrimages.” 4.When done, continue working on THIEVES

2 British Literature 11/9 Trips taken for the purpose of renewal or inspiration, even if they are not religious, can loosely be called pilgrimages. Think about a pilgrimage you’ve taken or would like to take. Describe your pilgrimage in your W.N.

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4 THIEVES Use the Thieves Worksheet as a pre-reading strategy. Complete the worksheet and use an additional piece of paper to complete the task.

5 British Literature – yes, this is for you. 1.Get out your response on “Pilgrimage” writing from last week and your THIEVES worksheet to be graded if you haven’t already. 2.Review the background on Geoffrey Chacuer on p In your W.N., Chaucer wrote 24 tales based on stereotypical characters from his time (the knight, the nun, the students, etc) if you were writing, “The Grapevine Tales,” which stereotypical characters would you include. 4.Come up with at least 10 characters for your own Tale and give a brief description of them.

6 The Canterbury Tales Background on Chaucer p. 86 History: Pilgrimages Characterization Old English v. Middle English by Geoffrey Chaucer

7 Let’s Dive In. As we read, begin to think about the characters you are attracted to or not attracted to. We will be doing a character analysis presentation at the conclusion of The Prologue in which you compare one of Chaucer’s characters to another modern example, and perhaps even an antithesis. We will be doing character portraits along with justifications from Chaucer’s text.

8 Brit Lit: Characterization Take out your Grapevine Tales Characters & Knight Portrait to be graded. In your W.N., look at your Knight Portrait. Are your descriptions internal or external? What’s the difference?

9 Map the Journey Google Earth Southwark to Canterbury

10 Character Portrait Illustrate the Knight. What did he look like? His clothes? In your portrait, include support from the text rationalizing each element. “Crimson Jersey” Line 47 “shining like gold in the sun” Line 53 “he clutched the ball” Line 58 “he moved with swiftness ” Line 65

11 Character Journals Character External: Internal: Comparison: Character External: Internal: Comparison: Character External: Internal: Comparison: Continue reading Chaucer’s Prologue, completing character journals for each character you encounter Knight, Squire, Yeoman, Nun, Monk, & Friar journals Due Friday

12 Ahh… Technology… Staats, Adamcik, Dinwiddie Bailey, Heady, Petty, Juliano

13 Ahh… Technology… Low, Baynard, Orfield Kettler, Hughes, Johnson

14 Character Journals Character External: Internal: Comparison: Character External: Internal: Comparison: Character External: Internal: Comparison: Get out your Knight, Squire, Yeoman, Nun, Monk, & Friar journals Due Friday Continue Reading, creating journals for each of the consecutive characters

15 Character Journals Pg Due Friday: Knight, Squire, Yeoman, Nun (Prioress), Monk, Friar Pg Due Monday: Merchant, Oxford Cleric, Sergeant at the Law, Franklin, Haberdasher/Dyer/Carpenter/Weaver/Carpet- Maker, Cook, Skipper, Doctor, Woman of Bath, Parson Pg Due Tuesday: Plowman, Miller, Manciple, Reeve, Summoner, Pardoner, the Host.

16 Character Analysis Portfolio At random, we’ve drawn names in hopes of discovering and digging deeper into the true identity and heart of the characters of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales. Everyone will create a portfolio examining and comparing their character to a modern-day counterpart.

17 Character Analysis Portfolio There will be 4 components to the portfolio: A Costume A Character Portrait A Portfolio Cover A Critical Analysis Paper

18 Canterbury Costume Using descriptions and details from the prologue to Chaucer’s “The Canterbury Tales,” design and create a costume for a Canterbury pilgrim. You might want to use a Barbie doll or a Ken doll as a model for your pilgrim’s costume, but you certainly don’t have to if you have a better idea. You might even choose to model the costume yourself!

19 Canterbury Costume You can use any materials available to you including doll clothes or regular people clothes that already exist. Just be sure that Chaucer students can easily tell which pilgrim you have depicted.

20 Canterbury Costume This project will be evaluated according to the extent to which you can use the STATED DETAILS as well as the INFERRED INFORMATION about the character to create a costume that will help to bring the character to life.

21 Character Portrait Much like our “Knight Portrait,” use evidence from the text to come up with as complete a picture of your character as possible. You may chose to use external research about a medieval profession to get a better idea about what the character might look like. In your portrait, include at least four textual evidences to support and rationalize your portrait.

22 Portfolio Cover Select a meaningful quote capturing the essence of your character and illustrate it so that it will fit on the front of your portfolio folder. You may use original artwork, computer graphics, calligraphy, graphic fonts, cut-and-paste illustrations from magazines -- whatever will help you make the most of the words themselves.

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28 Portfolio Cover See the website for examples: tions/quotes.html (for example, A Portfolio on Grendel might include the following quote from the text: “The bane of the race of men roamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.” And the illustration might include a black background with peering-red eyes.) tions/quotes.html

29 Character Analysis Portfolio Compose a word critical character analysis, using support from the text to compare and contrast your character with a modern stereotype/figure. Typed MLA format.

30 Portfolio Presentation On Monday, be prepared to give a 2-3 minute presentation of your costume, an explanation of your character, and who you chose to compare them to. Be PREPARED to present and to powerfully affect your audience.

31 Let’s Help Each Other Out We've been compiling characterizations from the Prologue and now that we're getting ready to present, let's share our findings and help each other out. Some of you had some great insight into some of the characters and had some unique ideas about modern- day comparisons.

32 Post your findings in the appropriate folder. I'll assign minimums to ensure that everyone gets some assistance, but feel free to post any additional insight on any other characters you gathered in your reading.

33 THIEVES Response Get out your THIEVES worksheet, and Answer the “Guide for Responding” questions on pg –Reader’s Response –Casting Call – pick 5 characters –Check Comprehension 1-4 –Critical Thinking 1-6 –Literary Focus 1-2 –Vocabulary 1-4, 1-7 –Grammar & Style 1-3 DUE Wednesday – Test on Friday


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