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Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©1 Bringing in the Bystander TM A Prevention Workshop for Establishing a Community of Responsibility.

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Presentation on theme: "Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©1 Bringing in the Bystander TM A Prevention Workshop for Establishing a Community of Responsibility."— Presentation transcript:

1 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©1 Bringing in the Bystander TM A Prevention Workshop for Establishing a Community of Responsibility

2 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©2 Brainstorm on Bystander Responsibility n What is a bystander? n Are our ideas of bystanders positive or negative? n Why?

3 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©3 DEFINITIONS: n Bystanders are individuals who witness emergencies, criminal events or situations that could lead to criminal events and by their presence may have the opportunity to provide assistance, do nothing, or contribute to the negative behavior. n A positive bystander model calls for prevention efforts that take a wider community approach rather than simply targeting individuals as potential perpetrators or victims. n In the context of this program, pro-social bystanders are individuals whose behaviors intervene in ways that impact the outcome positively.

4 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©4 Stoke Hall Gang Rape 1987 n Three men gang raped a woman in 1987 in Stoke Hall, a residence hall at UNH. n The victim transferred to another University. n Two of three offenders plead guilty to misdemeanor sexual assault for which they would each spend 2 months in prison.

5 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©5 Where were the Bystanders? Stoke Hall Gang Rape 1987 n Witnesses had opportunities to intervene at every stage but did not do so until after 2 female witnesses learned that the victim was a friend, not a stranger. n A Resident Assistant warned the perpetrators to get “ the girl ” out of their room. No one went to the victim ’ s assistance or helped her to Health Services or to the police (Keegan, 1987).

6 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©6 Where did study of bystanders begin? n For more than a half an hour, 38 respectable, law- abiding citizens in Queens, NY watched a killer stalk and stab a woman in three separate attacks. n Two times the sound of the bystanders’ voices and the sudden glow of their bedroom lights interrupted the assailant and frightened him. Each time, he returned and stabbed her again. n Not a single person telephoned the police during the assault; only one witness called the police after the woman was dead. (The New York Times, March 13, 1964)

7 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©7 Intervention Research Confirms: n Recognize situation You must be aware of the problem and recognize the negative impact on the victim (Batson, 1998). n Being asked Those who are asked and agree to help, are far more likely to intervene than those who are not asked (Moriarity, 1975). n Role Model Have role models who help and witnessing others provide help in other situations can facilitate intervention (e.g., Batson, 1998). n Group size The number of bystanders she or he thought were present; the more bystanders, the slower to act (Latane & Darley,1978).

8 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©8 Empowered Bystanders Witnesses To Alleged De Anza Rape Speak Out POSTED: 10:10 pm PDT May 22, 2007 UPDATED: 8:43 pm PDT May 24, 2007 SAN JOSE -- Two young women who say they intervened during a savage assault at a college party are speaking out in an exclusive television interview. The women say they witnessed a rape last March that involved members of the De Anza College baseball team, and they are now outraged that the Santa Clara County District Attorney has chosen not to prosecute the case. Lauren Chief Elk and April Grolle are 20-year old De Anza College students and teammates on the school's soccer squad. They were leaving a party at a house when they realized something wrong was going on in a back room where the doors were closed and the lights were off. "We heard and saw a girl tapping on this door in the kitchen saying 'There is a girl in there with eight guys," explains Chief Elk. They say they tried to get into the room, but were confronted by a baseball player. "[He said] 'Mind your own business; she wants to be in here' and slams the door," says Grolle. What they saw through a crack in the door horrified them. "When I looked in, I saw about ten pairs of legs surrounding a girl, lying on the mattress on the floor and a guy on top of her with his pants down and his hips thrusting on top of her," recall Chief Elk. "And when I saw that I knew immediately something wasn't right. It just didn't look right." "I saw that this young girl did not want to be in there, and that's when we just went 'We're getting this girl out of there,'" says Grolle.

9 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©9

10 10 risky illegal

11 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©11 Core sex offenders Sexism Hyper- masculinity Denigration of women Calloused sexual attitudes Rape Culture Slide by D. Lisak

12 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©12 Facts about sexual violence n Most (80 to 90%) of women who are raped are raped by men they know. n Most people tell the truth about rape. Only 2% to 8% are false reports - same rate as most other felony crimes. n Rape is an act of violence, sex is weapon. n Most men don’t rape, but the few that do, commit multiple rapes as well as other assaults. n Majority of perpetrators remain undetected in our community – they are not caught. n Sexual violence affects everyone. n Rape can happen to anyone, anywhere at any time.

13 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©13 Close up Distant Alone With others Most safe Least safe

14 Bringing in the Bystander (Plante, Banyard, Moynihan, Eckstein)©14 Decision Making Process QUESTIONS TO ASK BEFORE I TAKE ACTION: n Am I aware there is a problem or risky situation? n Do I recognize someone needs help? n Do I see others and myself as part of the solution? QUESTIONS TO ASK DURING THE SITUATION: n How can I keep myself safe? n What are my available options? n Are there others I may call upon for help? n What are the benefits/costs for taking action? DECISION TO TAKE ACTION: n When to act? n Resources: people, phone, etc available? n ACT


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